Tag Archives: History

Sumptuous Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona Spain: Cathedral of the Sea

Gothic Church of Santa Maria del Mar

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona SpainI love the Sumptuous Santa Maria dei Mar cathedral in Barcelona Spain; also known as Cathedral of the Sea in Catalonia.

Catalonia was part of the great Aragonese maritime power and at one time it was one of the most prosperous cities in the Mediterranean. The foundation stone of the church was laid by King Alfonso IV of Aragon and the Catalan Gothic church was built between 1329 and 1383. In 1428 an earthquake destroyed the rose window on the west end of the church. It was replaced in the 15th century with a Gothic window. Outside the church, visit the trendy Passeig del Born with plenty of shopping and Vino con Vista opportunities.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes travel guides at www.vino-con-vista.com.
 

Barcelona Spain Santa Maria del Mar

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Easter and Holy Week Rituals in Sicily: Buona Pasqua

English: Cathedral of San Giorgio, Modica, Sic...

English: Cathedral of San Giorgio, Modica, Sicily, Italy. Français : Cathédrale San Giorgio, Modica, Sicile, Italie. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Coat of Arms of Caltanissetta, Sicily...

English: Coat of Arms of Caltanissetta, Sicily, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Coat of arm of Sicily

English: Coat of arm of Sicily (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A baroque church in Modica

A baroque church in Modica (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many towns in Sicily have a

 

Petralia Sottana, Sicily

Petralia Sottana, Sicily (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

strong tradition of religious rites and ceremonies that date from the Spanish Domination of the 15th-17th centuries. These rites are demonstrated during mystic Holy Week celebrations.

 

On Good Friday at 5:00 p.m., the Society of the Passion of Christ  leaves their parish church and is joined by all the other Confraternities on Via Roma. They make their way to Chiesa dell’Addorlarato. The statue of  “Our Lady  of the Seven Sorrows” is carried to to the Cathedral where the Urn of the Dead Christ awaits her. At 7:00 p.m., thousands march in a solemn and silent torch-lit  procession behind men dressed in white hooded costumes. These costumes represent medieval fraternities of artisans and artists (Confraternities). Today there are 15 of the original 34 Confraternities still in existence. They take turns carrying marble statues of a deceased Christ and “Our Lady of Sorrows.” The group is accompanied by 24 symbols of Christ’s martrydom including the cross containing a reliquary of the “Crown of Thorns” and tools of flagellation.  Watch this video of Easter Rituals in Enna http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ3kX-uGRec&feature=related.

 

Holy Week celebrations begin on Palm Sunday with the Procession of the Confraternities, the L’Ura  from their individual churches to the Duomo  in solemn Eucharistic adoration.  The Baroque Duomo was founded by Eleonora, the wife of the 13th century Swabian King Frederick II.  The Cathedral has a spacious 16th century interior. The Confraternities are accompanied by the town band on their way to the Cathedral.

 

On Easter Sunday the ritual involves “A Paci” when the statues of the Resurrected Christ and Mary are reunited in the Cathedral Square under a joyous celebration of ringing bells.

 

Some of the other towns in Sicily where you can witness elaborate Holy Week (Settimana Santa) and Easter (Pasqua) rituals include:

 

Modica http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ajKBBwQBtg&feature=related

 

Caltanissetta http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYUq5jXAB-8&feature=related

 

Corleone http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gMksfWbHhU

 

Vizzini http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SO-KekZSTY

 

and Petralia Sottana U “Ncuontru http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ePVTL00S3U

 

Petralia Sottana (PA), Panorama parziale.

Petralia Sottana (PA), Panorama parziale. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To learn more about Sicily go to  www.vino-con-vista.com.

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides and Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites.
 

 

 

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Halloween Happenings at The Clarke Museum on Prairie Street in Chicago

Pre-American Civil War photo of the Henry B. C...

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The Clarke House Museum in the Historic Prairie District  is the oldest surviving domestic structure in the city of Chicago. The Greek Revival Clarke House at 1827 S. Indiana St. has a colorful history. It has survived two fires and has been moved twice.

Clarke House Museum

Clarke House Museum

It was designed by an unknown architect in 1836. It is characterized by a large portico supported by tall Greek Doric columns and a pediment. The Italianate finial and cupola were added in the 1850s. It opened as a museum in 1982 with period  furnishings provided by the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. I loved the horse-hair upholstery.

Clarke House Museum Exterior

Clarke House Museum Exterior

Clarke House Museum Exterior

Clarke House Museum

Clarke House Museum Cupola

Clarke House Museum

Clarke House Museum Interior

Clarke House Museum Exterior

Clarke House Museum Exterior

 

Henry and Caroline Clarke built their house on 20 acres of land at 16th and Michigan Avenue in 1836, a year before the city was officially incorporated. In 1872, the Clarke children sold the house to John Chrimes who moved it to Wabash and 45th Street. In 1941, his grand daughters sold the house to Bishop Louis Henry Ford and the Saint Paul Church of God in Christ used the house as their parish hall until 1977.

The city of Chicago bought the house and moved it to the present location on Prairie Street on December 4, 1977. The house had to be lifted over the “L” Tracks and was set on a new foundation on Prairie Street. The Clarke House Museum is open for tours and is nestled in the beautiful grounds of the Women’s Park and Gardens.

Clarke House Museum

Clarke House Museum Gardens

Clarke House Women's Park and Gardens

Clarke House Women’s Park and Gardens

The park celebrates the contributions of women who built Chicago.   There are beautiful “Helping Hands” sculptures by Louise Bourgeois that serve as a memorial to  Jane Addams. For more information visit www.clarkehousemuseum.org.

Chicago's Prairie District

Chicago’s Prairie District Women’s Park

Chicago's Prairie District South Loop

Clarke House Museum Grounds and Gardens

Helping Hands in Chicago by Louise Bourgeois

Helping Hands in Chicago by Louise Bourgeois

The Prairie District Neighborhood Alliance has an annual Fall historic street fair called “The Festival on Prairie Avenue.” The annual event takes place at Prairie and 18th Street. The event features many exciting attractions including: a main stage with entertainment, a menagerie of exotic animals, pony rides, a War of 1812 encampment, period fashions, a pie eating contest, food & tours of the Landmark Glessner and Clarke Houses. Artists feature a number of historic crafts and interactive art demonstrations. Exhibits include: Pottery, Ceramics, Candles, Knitting, Weaving, Glass Making, Textiles, Painting and Jewelry.

ANNUAL EDGAR ALLAN POE READINGS: If you prefer to take in Prairie Avenue’s Halloween ambience from the inside, the Clarke House Museum teams up with Lifeline Theatre for an evening of tales to tremble by from America’s master of horror. 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Oct. 25; Clarke House Museum, 1827 S. Indiana Ave.; $25 at 312-326-1480 or glessnerhouse.org

Tour:  Shadows on the Street – Haunted Tours of Historic Prairie Avenue

Friday October 30 and Saturday October 31, 2015

Tours at 7:00 and 8:15pm

Tours begin at the Glessner House Museum Vistors Center

$10 per person / $8 for members

Pre-paid reservations suggested to 312.326.1480

Tales of strange sounds, unexplained sightings, and untimely endings as you explore Prairie Avenue after dark!

Performance:  29th Annual Edgar Allan Poe Readings

Saturday October 31, 2015

Readings at 5:00 and 8:00pm

Clarke House Museum, 1827 S. Indiana Avenue

$25 per person / $22 for members

Pre-paid reservations required to 312.326.1480

Squirm in your seat as actors from Lifeline Theatre present staged readings of Poe’s terrifying stories and poetry.  A holiday favorite now in its 29th year!

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Alghero’s Cathedral of Santa Maria in Italy

Catalan Gothic cathedral's bell tower in Alghe...

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Alghero is a beautiful coastal city of medieval origin situated in the northwestern coral coast of Sardinia. This town is 300 miles off the coast of Spain near Barcelona. They speak Italian as well as Catalan.

The recently refurbished cathedral of Santa Maria (Cattedrale di Santa Maria Immacolata di Alghero)  stands in Piazza del Duomo on Via Sant’Erasmo. Some of its oldest structures provide an outstanding example of the late Catalan-Gothic period.  This cathedral has been the bishop’s seat since 1503.

Door of the Cathedral’s Bell Tower in Alghero Sardinia

This cathedral is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It has an elaborate apse and an octagonal bell tower with a pyramidal cuspid. Some of the construction has dramatically transformed the interior and the façade. The original facade was replaced in 1862. The changes include four neo-classical Doric Columns supporting a triangular pediment  and a new central staircase.

The bell-tower is behind the church. It was part of the first phase of late Gothic construction and was modeled after the Cathedral of Barcelona. It has an octagonal barrel and pointed arch openings. It is crowned with a slender pyramid-shaped spire with polychrome majolica that is commonly used in Catalonia.  The distinctive Gothic  bell tower can be visited during high season.

Campanile of Santa Maria Cathedral in Alghero Sardinia

In 1503 Pope Julius II  implemented a major overhaul of the dioceses of Sardinia. He was supported in his efforts by King Ferdinand II. The first part of the building was finished during the first half of the XVI century and Alghero’s noble families guaranteed the financing needed to complete the project.

alghero Sardinia

Ornate lions in the cathedral of Alghero

The Cathedral was consecrated in 1730; 400 years after its foundation.  It houses the neoclassical marble mausoleum of the Duke of Monferrato, brother of King Carlo Felice  of Savoy, who died in 1799. This  mausoleum was sculpted by Felice Festa in 1807.

The interior space has three naves, separated by pillars and columns.  There are six chapels adorned with interesting sacred art. The first chapel to the right is dedicated to the Blessed Sacrament and it has an imposing altar consecrated in 1824. The carved marble is decorated the center with a circular temple reminiscent of the Temple of Vesta in Rome.

The Virgin protects the sailors in Alghero Sardinia

The Baptism in Alghero’s Cathedral

The presbytery has five chapels which include the base of the bell tower. It is surrounded by a balustrade, made ​​of inlaid marble with a coral hue. On the sides of the stairway to the altar there are two marble lions that resemble their kindred spirits in the Cathedral of Cagliari.

The balustrated high altar has a group of sculptures depicting the Immaculate Conception accompanied by angels.

The main altar of the cathedral in Alghero Sardinia

There is an elegant pulpit . Behind the wooden choir, in the apse there are five Gothic radial chapels.

Cathedral of Alghero Sardinia

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides available @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Alghero’s Museum of Sacred Art is Full of Treasures

Alghero‘s origins date back to the 10th century when the Genoese, with the help of Pisans, repelled the Arabs. Then they obtained land grants from the Judges (giudicati) of Logudoro that governed Sardinia during the Middle Ages.

The first capital city for the Giudicato of Logudoro was ancient Torres (now Porto Torres), but it was exposed to Arab attacks. Eventually, the seat of the judgeship was transferred to Ardara and finally to Sassari.

By the tenth century, the map on the right shows that the island was divided into four provinces or giudicati during the High Middle Ages Logudoro in the northwest section was the largest; Gallura to the east; Arborea to the south and Cagliari to the southeast. Later Logudoro and Arborea were combined into one province at the start of the eleventh century.

The Giudicato of Logudoro  was also known as the Giudicato of Torres, after Porto Torres. This area covered the northwest portion of Sardinia from the tenth through the thirteenth century. This is where Alghero is located.

Alghero was built around a fortified port, founded around 1102 by the Genoese Doria family. The Doria ruled it for centuries, apart from a brief period under the rule of Pisa (1283–1284). The Doria had fiefs in Sardinia from the 12th century to the 15th century. They also had fiefdoms in Dolceacqua, Oneglia and Portofino, in the Riviera to the west of Genoa.

In 1353 it was captured by the Aragonese under Bernardo de Cabrera. The Algherese revolted against the garrison’s commanding officer and killed him.  The Spanish responded by sending 12,000 men and 100 galleys to suppress the revolt.  A treaty was signed and the original Sardinian inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes and move to the town of Villanova about 25 killometers away.

The port became the main route between Catolonia and Sardinia and the town of Alghero was inhabited by Catalan colonists creating a distinctive Catonian settlement. The Spanish dominated the city for 360 years. Today, this region of Italy, enclosed with fortress walls is referred to as Little Barcelona. In 1720, control of Alghero passed to the House of Savoy.

To appreciate the sacred history of this charming town, visit the Museo Diocesano d’Arte Sacra. It is located in the historical center of the city of Alghero in the Rosary Church (Chiesa Del Rosario). The former church was enlarged between the 14th and 15th century when the upper floor was added to the structure.

The edifice became a church in the second half of the 17trh century. It was used as a place of worship until the first post-war period and ultimately became a museum in 2000. It is next to the Cathedral dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The treasures of the diocese of Alghero-Bosa are preserved in this Diocesan Museum of Sacred Art.

The Museum is in the former Church of Rosario on Piazza Duomo. The building was originally the Oratorio del Rosario; it belonged to the confraternity that founded the church of San Francesco in 1568. The small museum is packed with precious sacred art, artifacts and liturgical treasures.

The museum collection is divided into six sections: silver,  paintings, wooden sculptures, wood carving, stone and bronze. You will find an early 16th century “Our Lady of Sailors” from the Cathedral of the Virgin next door. It is attributed to a Catalan workshop. The museum opened on June 30, 2002 and preserves the Cathedral’s liturgical art, as well as sacred art from other churches in the diocese of Alghero-Bosa.

Our Lady of the Sailors

There is a beautiful “Eucharistic Throne” from 1720 from the Cathedral of the Virgin Mary. It is embossed and engraved from the workshop of Giovanni Andrea Lay from Cagliari.

Eucharistic Throne

There is a 17th century marble statue of  “Our Lady of Mercy” from the Church of Saint Michael that was created by a Ligurian workshop.

I loved the 19th century wooden carving of  “Baby Jesus” (Bambinello) from the Church of Saint Michael. It was adorned with coral and attributed to a Sicilian workshop.

Bambinello

The 17th century “Assumption of the Virgin” is  from a Sardinian workshop.

Assumption of the Virgin

There are precious sacred treasures from Alghero’s historical churches.

St. Lucy

Holy Family

In the Silver section there are beautiful objects created by silversmiths.  There is an impressive Catalan reliquary of the True Cross created by an unknown silversmith from Alghero in 1500.

The 17th century, Reliquary of a Holy Innocent Martyr is embossed in chiseled silver from a Sardinian workshop. It was originally in the Cathedral of the Virgin Mary.

Reliquary

Ornate Crucifix in Alghero Sardinia

This beautiful 17th century jeweled Monstrance (Ostensorio) was made by a silversmith from Trapani in 1679.

In the “Wooden Sculptures” Area of the Museum, there are many saints and representations of the Virgin. The golden statue represents the “Madonna dei Naviganti” by an unknown Catalan artist from the 15th century.

Madonna dei Naviganti

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Some of the polychrome wooden carvings from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth centuries include a gigantic San Michele Arcangelo (St.Michael the Archangel) from the end of the 17th century. It was formerly displayed in the church dedicated to St. Michael a few blocks away. The 18th century “Saint Joseph with the Child” from the church of Our Lady of Carmelo  is a polychrome wooden carving from a Neapolitan workshop.

There is a lovely 18th century oil on canvas Italian painting of “The Holy Family with the Saints Joachim and Anna.”

There are also a series of mid-17th century paintings by Genoese painters of scenes from the lives of Jesus and the Virgin. The 17th century brutal Ligurian School representation of the  “Scourging of Christ”  painting below is from the Church of Our Lady of Mercy.

Scourging of Christ

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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The Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence is the “National Pantheon”

A monument to the florentines fallen during th...

A monument to the florentines fallen during the WW1. God the Father, by Bandinelli. Santa Croce cloister, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Crucifixion, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence...

Crucifixion, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pulpit, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy.

Pulpit, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Monument à la mémoire de Donatello,...

Français : Monument à la mémoire de Donatello, Basilique Santa Croce de Florence, Italie. 1895. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Exterior of the Basilica of Santa Cro...

English: Exterior of the Basilica of Santa Croce (Florence). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Santa Croce is the church of the Franciscans and was built in the Italian gothic style.  It was completed in 1442.

Français : La porte principale de la basilique...

Français : La porte principale de la basilique de la Sainte-Croix (Santa Croce) à Florence, Italie. English: The main gate of Basilica Santa Croce in Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Santa Croce

Santa Croce (Photo credit: Dorina Bernard)

The Neo-Gothic façade was re-clad in 1863 in pink, green and white Tuscan marble. It is located in the Piazza di Santa Croce.

Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy

Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (Photo credit: SpirosK)

Florence Italy

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is dubbed the “National Pantheon” because it has tombs or centotaphs of the greatest Italians.  A centotaph is a funerary monument without the remains of the deceased.

The six-pointed star in the central tympanum is Medieval and these rays  symbolize St. Bernadino. In Christian art, there are many saints associated with this star: St. Bruno bears a star on his breast; Saint Dominic, Saint Humbert and Saint Peter of Alcantara have this star on their head or forehead.

Florence Italy

The beautiful bell tower was rebuilt in 1842 by Gaetano Baccani because it was destroyed by a bolt of lightning in 1512.

Michelangelo's tomb

Michelangelo’s tomb (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Florence Italy

Tondo of Saint Matthew the Evangelist on the d...

Tondo of Saint Matthew the Evangelist on the dome of Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (It has been suggested that it was the work of Donatello.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of Saint John the Evangelist on the dome...

Tondo of Saint John the Evangelist on the dome of Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (It has been suggested that it was the work of Donatello.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

South of the church, visit the secret garden and cloisters. The Pazzi Chapel was designed by Brunelleschi in 1429. It is set in front of the neo-Gothic bell-tower. The chapel  is adorned by  terracotta tondi of the apostles by Luca della Robbia and by roundels of the Evangelists by Donatello.

The loggia was built and decorated in grey sandstone and decorated with terracotta.

inside view of the Dome hidden in the portico ...

inside view of the Dome hidden in the portico of Cappella dei Pazzi, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Main Chapel was commissioned by Jacopo degli Alberti. The polyptych on the altar was redone in the 19th century and portrays the Virgin, Saints and Fathers of the Church crowned by a large crucifix by “Maestro de Figline” who worked in Giotto’s workshop. There is a beautiful Polyptych by Giotto and his pupils in the Baroncelli Chapel.

FLorence Italy

The Florentine Pantheon has tombs and monuments to legendary citizens. Many marble tombstones cover the floor of Santa Croce.

Renaissance tombs exalted the dead person’s achievements on earth. Most of the monuments is Santa Croce have designated allegorical figures to depict the earthly accomplishments of the deceased. The wall of the right nave contains the “Monument to Michelangelo” by Vasari (1570).

Michelangelo Buonarroti

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo returned to Florence between in 1499–1501, after after the fall Girolamo Savonarola who was executed in 1498. Michelangelo was asked to complete a colossal statue portraying David that was started 40 years earlier by Agostino di Duccio.

David

David (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Statue of David  would occupy a prominent spot  in the Piazza della Signoria, in front of the Palazzo Vecchio. Today the statue outside the Palazzo Vecchio is a replica. The real David is in the Academia in Florence.

Michelangelo-Buonarroti-David-Replica-Florence

Michelangelo-Buonarroti-David-Replica-Florence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This famous sculpture was made from a marble block from the quarries at Carrara.

In 1505, Michelangelo was invited back to Rome by Pope Julius II to build the Pope’s tomb. He worked on the tomb for 40 years.

The tomb of Pope Julius II by Michelangelo and...

The tomb of Pope Julius II by Michelangelo and its statue of Moise in the basilica San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The tomb is located in the Church of S. Pietro in Vincoli in Rome and  Michelangelo’s statue of Moses is the central feature.

Statue of Moses by Michelangelo, church San Pi...

Statue of Moses by Michelangelo, church San Pietro in Vincoli; Rome, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Michelangelo died, Vasari erected his tomb in Santa Croce. The sarcophagus is surrounded by allegorical figures of “Painting” by Battista Lorenzi, “Sculpture” by Valerio Cioli and “Architecture” by Giovanni dell’Opera.  The bust of Michelangelo was carved by Lorenzi. The beautiful frescoes that flank the monument were done by Domenico Ghirlandaio.

On November 17, 2015, they launched a  Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for the restoration of the Pazzi Chapel Loggia, one of the finest examples of Renaissance architecture, in the Santa Croce complex. make your contribution here: http://www.santacroceopera.it/en/Opera_Sponsor.aspx

cappella pazzi, santa croce, florence

The interior of Santa Croce, Florence

The interior of Santa Croce, Florence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides to Italy at www.vino-con-vista.com

Florence Italy

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Vino con Vista Loves Italian Renaissance Art

Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci, Galleria d...
Image via Wikipedia
English: Self-portrait of Leonardo da Vinci. R...

English: Self-portrait of Leonardo da Vinci. Red chalk. 33 × 21 cm. Turin, Royal Library (inv.no. 15571). NOTE This image is in red chalk. Do not revert to the black and white image. Deutsch: Kopf eines bärtigen Mannes, sog. Selbstbildnis. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Annunciation (1475–1480)—Uffizi, is thought to...

Annunciation (1475–1480)—Uffizi, is thought to be Leonardo’s earliest complete work. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This complex Adoration of the Magi by Leonardo...

This complex Adoration of the Magi by Leonardo da Vinci was never completed. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Death of Leonardo da Vinci by François-Guillau...

Death of Leonardo da Vinci by François-Guillaume Ménageot (now to be seen in the observatory and museum at Amboise). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo-pieta

Image via Wikipedia

Raffael 006

Image via Wikipedia

Leonardo da Vinci - Madonna Litta - WGA12702

Leonardo da Vinci – Madonna Litta – WGA12702 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Euro-standard circulation Italian 1 euro coin ...

Euro-standard circulation Italian 1 euro coin (national/obverse side). The design represents Leonardo da Vinci’s drawing of the proportions of the human body (also known as the Vitruvian man). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Statue of Leonardo da Vinci ...by himself ? In...

Statue of Leonardo da Vinci …by himself ? In front of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne and Saint...

The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne and Saint John the Baptist (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Leonardo da Vinci was the embodiment of a Renaissance Man because he excelled at a variety of worthwhile endeavors. He was a celebrated sculptor, painter, architect, engineer and scientist. Leonardo’s “Vitruvian Man” represents the perfectly proportioned man.

English: Studies of Embryos by Leonardo da Vin...

English: Studies of Embryos by Leonardo da Vinci (Pen over red chalk 1510-1513) Français : étude anatomique du foetus dans l’uterus, par Léonard de Vinci (1510-1513, Plume, encre sur papier) Cette célèbre étude montre un foetus âgé de 4 mois. Outre l’image extrêmement plastique de la “position foetale”, Leonard cherche à visualiser la constitution du placenta. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Watch the following video showing four major Italian Renaissance artists and their work : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVQBVE9BzYk

tempera on gesso, pitch and mastic

Image via Wikipedia

Michelangelo Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbZen2OOA3M&feature=related

Giotto - The Entombment of Mary - Google Art P...

Image via Wikipedia

Titian, Raphael, Giotto Video:

Raphael - Von der Ropp Madonna

Image via Wikipedia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBTtjDMBIbk&feature=related Botticelli Video:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOILQzTfYww&feature=related are notable Renaissance artists who were commissioned by wealthy families and popes.

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci.

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Leonardo

Leonardo (Photo credit: Arenamontanus)

The contributions of these artists decorate the walls of churches, palaces and museums around the world. The Renaissance flourished in Italy and Italian masters graced humanity with a wealth of masterpieces Bartolommeo Vivarini from Venice produced works of art for cities across Northern Italy and down the Adriatic Coast including this altarpiece of “Saint Mark” around 1490.

Italian Renaissance art

 Cosme Tura from Ferrara painted “Saint George” around 1474 for the Church of San Giorgio fuori le Mura in Ferrara. Carlo Crivelli from Venice painted the “Madonna and Child” in 1468. Alessandro Mattia da Farnese from Rome painted the “Portrait of Prince Augusto Chigi” in 1664. Giovanni di Paolo from Sienna painted “The Madonna and Child with Angels” in 1475. Sano di Pietro from Siena painted “Saint Catherine of Siena” in about 1450. Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro) from Florence painted “The Madonna and Child” in 1411-1413. Giotto‘s “God the Father with Angels”

Italian Renaissance art

Perugino from Umbria

Saint Jerome

Bernardino Luini from Milan painted “The Conversion of the Magdalene” (An Allegory of Modesty and Vanity) in 1520 with gesturing hands.

Italian Renaissance art

Catena’s “Holy Family” I love Luca Signorelli’s, “The Coronation of the Virgin” 1508

Italian Renaissance Art

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Have a Vino con Vista near the Pantheon in Rome Italy

Plan of the first ( Red ) (by Marcus Vipsanius...

Plan of the first ( Red ) (by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa) and of the third (Black) (by Hadrian) Pantheon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Rom, Pantheon mit Vorplatz inklusive ...

Deutsch: Rom, Pantheon mit Vorplatz inklusive Obelisk. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hadrian's Pantheon in Rome is an example of Ro...

Hadrian’s Pantheon in Rome is an example of Roman concrete construction. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you want a breathtaking Vino con Vista, visit the Pantheon in Rome. The majestic Pantheon is the Church of Santa Maria ad Martyres located on the Piazza della Rotonda. This is my favorite area to stay in because it is packed with restaurants and bars and has a very lively nightlife. I can never get enough of that gorgeous ancient Pantheon.

Here’s a brief history and some interesting facts about this magnificent structure:

1. The first Pantheon was constructed by Marcus Agrippa between 27-25 B.C.

2. Between 118-125 A.D., Emperor Hadrian built a new Pantheon and, in 609, it was consecrated as the Church of Santa Maria ad Martyres under Pope Boniface IV.

3. The only light that enters the circular building is through a hole in the center of the coffered dome called the “oculus”.

4. The building was constructed from a new material of the time called concrete, which wasinvented after the devastating fire in ROme of 64 to comply with the new fireproofing ordinances.

5.  The ornate marble inlaid floor  is sloped slightly so that rainwater would be able to drain from inside the building.

6.  In 735, Pope Gregory III had the roof done in lead and, in 663, Emporer Constans II removed the gilded tiles from the roof.

7.  To support the heavy dome, the walls are 19 feet thick.

8. The Rotonda’s height and width are the same – 140 feet.

9. The original portico built by M. Agrippa remain and is built on the foundation of the original temple.

10. There were twin bell towers added on each side of the portico but  they were removed in 1883.

11.  The interior walls are lined with tombs, including  Raphael and King Vittorio Emanuele II.

12. When the Papacy moved to  Avignon between 1305-1377, the Pantheon was used as a poultry market and fortress.

13. In 1632, Urban VIII had the bronze from the portico anddome melted down to provide Bernini the bronze with which to build the baldacchino in St. Peter’s Basilica.

14. Concerts are also held here from time to time.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com

 

 

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Roman Emperor History Tips

Bust of Gaius Julius Caesar in the National Ar...
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Augustus Pontifex Maximus #3

Augustus Pontifex Maximus #3 (Photo credit: Roger B. Ulrich)

Emperor Nero. Plaster cast in Pushkin museum a...

Emperor Nero. Plaster cast in Pushkin museum after original in British museum, London (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bust of Tiberius, a successful military comman...

Bust of Tiberius, a successful military commander under Augustus before he was designated as his heir and successor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Marmorbüste des Caligula mit Farbrest...

Deutsch: Marmorbüste des Caligula mit Farbresten; daneben Rekonstruktion der Polychromie an einer Gipsreplik, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Kopenhagen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Bust of Nero at the Capitoline Museum...

English: Bust of Nero at the Capitoline Museum, Rome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Roman ForumWhen you’re in Rome having a Vino con Vista at one of my favorite rooftop bars, you can flaunt your knowledge of Roman history.

Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek.

Emperor Caligula, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a tip for remembering the names of the first five Roman Emperors after Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 B.C.  Remember the phrase “Another Tom cat caught napping”.  The emperors are Augustus (27 B.C.–AD 14), Tiberius (14-37), Caligula (37-41), Claudius (41-54) and Nero (54-68).

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek – Emperor Caligula

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek – Emperor Caligula (Photo credit: Michiel2005)

English: A statue of the first Roman Emperor A...

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From the statue in Rome. The Emperor Nero.

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Emperor Nero blamed the burning of Rome on Christian terrorists. In 64, most of Rome was destroyed in the Great Fire of Rome, which many Romans believed Nero himself had started in order to clear land for his planned palatial complex, the Domus Aurea. Nero ordered the execution of the apostles Peter and Paul during his reign.

Mosaics in the Hagia Sophia, section: Maria as...

Mosaics in the Hagia Sophia, section: Maria as patron saint of Istanbul, detail: Emperor Constantine I with a model of the city (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: In the porch of S. Giovanni in Latera...

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Eventually, with a succession of 25 emperors in 75 years, the Emperor Constantine (306-337 AD) joined the Christians and before he moved to Constantinople he built several churches in Rome.

Head of Emperor Constantine I, part of a colos...

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English: Main façade of the Basilica of St. Jo...

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San Giovanni in Laterano, St. Peter’s Basilica and San Lorenzo fuori le Mura were all built during Constantine’s reign. Talent and leadership abandoned the newly divided empire and successive waves of Barbarians invaded Rome including the Visigoths, Vandals and the Ostrogoths.

Albrecht Dürer - Emperor Charlemagne - WGA06998

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By 800 AD, Emperor Charlemagne asserted papal authority and launched another power struggle between the Church and imperial authority. By 1309, the pope moved to the safety of Avignon. The papacy’s supremacy returned to Rome in 1377. In the 1500’s, a glorious rebirth of Rome flourished when the popes invited the most talented architects, painters and sculptors to rebuild Rome’s grandeur during the Renaissance.

Rome, Ara Pacis museum: cast of a portrait of ...

Rome, Ara Pacis museum: cast of a portrait of emperor Tiberius. From the collection of casts of busts showing the members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. The original artwork is exhibited in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek (Copenhagen). Picture by Giovanni Dall’Orto, March 30 2008. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides and

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites
 

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Francesco Borromini’s Church of Sant Ivo alla Sapienza in Rome

Cupola di Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza

Cupola di Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza is located on Corso del Rinascimento at the end of the Palazzo della Sapienza courtyard.  It is the only church in Rome with a corkscrew, twisted spiral spire.  The corkscrew spiral was the  inspiration for the spire of Vor Frelsers Kirke in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza by Francesco Borromini

Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza by Francesco Borromini (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This Baroque church was built between 1642 and 1660 in the ancient courtyard of the Università la Sapienza (University of Knowledge), by Francesco Borromini.

IMG 0397 - Sant'Ivo alla sapienza

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English: Chapel Sant’Ivo, designed by Borromin...

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This was originally the chapel church of the University of Rome (La Sapienza).  Sapienza means “Knowledge” and it was the first university founded in Rome.

Click here to watch a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0xzXhJ-_-E.

The façade is decorated with columns that are incorporated into the walls. There are semi-circular arched windows which rise toward the spiral capital that is supporting the cupola.

On the main altar, there is a painting depicting the following Saints: Ives, Leo, Pantaleone, Luke, Catherine of Alexandria, in “The Glory of the Saints” (1661) by Pietro da Cortona. This university in Rome is dedicated to its namesake, Saint Ives (patron saint of the jurists). He is considered ” The Advocate of the Poor.”

English: Dome of the Chapel Sant’Ivo, designed...

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Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza was consecrated in 1660 and was built by the architect Francesco Borromini. Since one of the distinctive characteristics of the church is the beautiful corkscrew spire on the dome; for 15 years after  placing the spire on the roof,  Borromini was responsible for it  in case it collapsed. Inside the church, you can also admire the portrait of Saint Ives on the altar.

Francesco Borromini

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SantIvo Bees

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The church of Saint Ives was built under the direction of Cardinal Barberini. You can observe the Barberini Bees on the facade of the church.

SantIvo Dome

SantIvo Dome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The church began as a chapel of the palace of the University of Rome. The University is called La Sapienza, and the church is devoted to Saint Yves.

Borromini SantIvo Cut

Borromini SantIvo Cut (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Statue de saint Yves.

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Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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