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Spooky Halloween Happenings 2018 on Historic Prairie Avenue in Chicago

The John J. Glessner House by Henry Hobson Ric...

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Prairie Avenue has always been influential in Chicago’s History with grand mansions and influential residents. During the late 19th century, Chicago’s most prestigious residential street was Prairie Avenue.

There are plenty of Halloween Happenings on Prairie Avenue:

1. Shadows on the Street: Haunted Tours of Historic Prairie Avenue

  •   
  • Glessner House1800 South Prairie AvenueChicago, IL, 60616United States (map)

Tales of strange sounds, unexplained sightings, and untimely endings await as you explore Prairie Avenue after dark! During this 60 minute walking tour through the Prairie Avenue Historic District, learn about the mystery surrounding the death of Marshall Field Jr., the tragic events that plagued the Philander Hanford house, the lingering ghost of Edson Keith, and more – if you dare!

Tours offered at the following times:
7:00-8:00pm
8:15-9:15pm
Select tour time at checkout.
Tours repeat at the same times on Friday October 26.

Tour takes place rain or shine, please dress appropriately.  Not recommended for children.

$15 per person / $12 for members

PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.

Purchase Tickets

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William W. Kimball Home on Chicago's Prairie District

William W. Kimball Home on Chicago’s Prairie Street Historic District

Prairie Avenue is located in Chicago’s South Loop neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago. The Prairie Avenue District is a Chicago Landmark district and was added to the National Register of Historic Places. During the Columbian Exposition, Prairie Street was considered a “Must See” destination. I love the chateaux style residence at 1802 S. Prairie, formerly owned by the owner of the Kimball Piano and Organ Company. It was designed by the architect Solon S. Beman. Today, it serves as the headquarters for the U.S. Soccer Federation.

3. 32nd Annual Edgar Allan Poe Readings

  •   
  • Glessner House
  • 1800 South Prairie Avenue
  • Chicago, IL, 60616United States (map)

Squirm in your seats as actors from Lifeline Theatre present staged readings of Poe’s terrifying stories and poetry. Hear classics like The Raven and The Tell-Tale Heart, as well as some of Poe’s lesser known works.  This is an extremely popular event and people return year after year, so don’t wait, tickets sell out fast!

Two readings:
5:00-6:15pm
8:00-9:15pm
Select time at checkout.

Not recommended for children.

$25 per person / $20 for members

PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED

Purchase Tickets

BACK TO ALL EVENTS

4. The World’s Columbian Exposition in Music and Story

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  • Second Presbyterian Church
  • 1936 South Michigan Avenue
  • Chicago, IL, 60616United States (map)

Step back in time 125 years to relive the grandeur and majesty that was the World’s Columbian Exposition.  The Fair was attended by 27 million people between May and October 1893 and secured Chicago’s place as a world-class city.

This very special performance will feature musical selections related to the fair, performed on the historic 4 manual Austin organ of Second Presbyterian Church by its music director Michael Shawgo.  Music was an integral part of the fair, ranging from formal concerts by the Exposition Orchestra led by Theodore Thomas, to six-weeks of band concerts led by John Philip Sousa.  The Midway introduced Fair visitors to a variety of music from around the world, much of which had never been heard in the United States.

October 28th also marks the 125th anniversary of the assassination of five-time Chicago mayor Carter H. Harrison, Sr.  The tragic event sent the city into deep mourning and the elaborate celebration planned to close the Fair just two days later was replaced by a large public memorial service.

Commentary during the performance will provide a rich variety of stories about the Fair, its impact on Chicago and the world, and how Chicagoans honored their fallen mayor as the Fair drew to a close.

Doors will open at 2:00pm for docent-led tours of the National Historic Landmark sanctuary.  A reception will feature selected food items introduced at the Fair, including brownies which were developed at the request of Bertha Palmer.  A small exhibit of Fair memorabilia will be on display.

This event is co-sponsored by Glessner House Museum and Friends of Historic Second Church.

$25 per person / $20 for members

Purchase Tickets

Another one of my historic favorites is the brown sandstone Joseph G. Coleman House by the architects Cobb & Frost at 1811 S. Prairie.

Joseph G. Coleman House at 1811 S. Prairie in Chicago

Joseph G. Coleman House at 1811 S. Prairie in Chicago

Several of  Chicago’s most notable families and  important historical figures have lived in the South Loop Prairie Avenue District. Today the street is full of new construction that blends into the style of the existing historic landmarks.

Empire style Elbridge G. Keith House at 1900 S. Prairie

Empire style Elbridge G. Keith House at 1900 S. Prairie

Many wealthy Chicago “Movers and Shakers” moved to Prairie Street after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Some of the prominent families that lived here included: the Pullmans, the Fields, the Armours and the Kimballs. When Philip Armour joined Field and Pullman on Prairie Street in 1875, Chicago’s three wealthiest citizens lived within a four block stretch of this historic neighborhood. These prominent Chicago legends influenced the  political history, the architecture, the culture, the economy, as well as the law and government of Chicago. Prairie Street lost some of its luster as the neighborhood became more industrialized and the demographics of Chicago changed over time. The Gold Coast and the North Shore became the more desirable areas for Chicago’s wealthy residents.

Although most of the houses have been demolished, you can still tour the 17,000 square foot Glessner House at 1800 S. Prairie.  It was designed in 1885-1886 by Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in late 1887. The granite fortress-like exterior conceals a large central courtyard.

Original Front Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue in Chicago

Original Front Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue in Chicago

The property was designated a Chicago Landmark on October 14, 1970. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and as a National Historic Landmark on January 7, 1976. It’s possible to have a wedding at this historic residence in the lovely courtyard.

The Glessner House Courtyard on Prairie Avenue

The Glessner House Courtyard on Prairie Avenue

Many newlyweds like to have their pictures taken at the “G” Door. If you turn the entrance to the staircase around, it forms the letter “G”.

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

John Glessner was one of the original founders of International Harvester, which became the fourth largest corporation in the country. Glessner was appointed vice president and continued in that capacity until his death in 1936 at the age of 92.

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

When Frances and  John J. Glessner and his family needed a winter house in Chicago, Mr. Glessner decided to build a home for his family on Prairie Avenue and 18th Street. He chose one of the nation’s foremost architects, H. H. Richardson.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson note to Mr. Glessner

Henry Hobson Richardson (September 29, 1838 – April 27, 1886) was born in Louisiana and became a prominent American architect. His portrait hangs in the foyer of the Glessner House, surrounded by oak walls and a stately fireplace.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson

Richardson’s work had an impact on Boston, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Albany, and Chicago. The style that Richardson developed over time was medieval and fortress-like. His contributions are called Richardsonian Romanesque. He inspired Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson

Richardson studied at Harvard College and Tulane University. Initially he was interested in civil engineering, but eventually shifted to architecture. His passion led him to Paris in 1860 where he attended the famed École des Beaux Arts in the atelier of Louis-Jules André. He was the second US citizen to attend the École des Beaux Arts. Richard Morris Hunt was the first American student. The French School played an increasingly important role in training American architects. Trinity Church in Boston built in 1872, is Richardson’s most acclaimed early work. This church solidified his reputation and provided major commissions for him for the remainder of his life.

The Glessner House interior on Prairie Avenue

The Glessner House interior on Prairie Avenue

Take a guided tour of the elegant interior of the house that Richardson designed. It  was rescued from demolition in 1966. It has been lovingly restored and is furnished with many of the original “Arts and Crafts” period furniture and an extraordinary collection of pottery and decorative arts.

Glessner House restored Parlor with pottery

Glessner House restored Parlor with pottery

Glessner House pottery

Glessner House pottery

I love the elaborate tiles on the fireplaces in this house and the piano that was returned to the house from the President of Harvard University.

Glessner House restored fireplace

Glessner House restored fireplace

Glessner House original Parlor Piano

Glessner House original Parlor Piano

The Eastlake style furniture was designed by Isaac Elwood Scott. The lavish parlor of the Glessner House Museum was restored recently with generous gifts from patrons including the Bunny J. Selig Memorial fund and the Aileen Mandel Memorial Fund. The dedication ceremony was held on October 14, 2011.

Afterwards, architect and historian John H. Waters presented a lecture on the contirbutions of William Pretyman. Pretyman produced the original wallcovering in the Glessner parlor.

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

The Museum offers a variety of programs to the public including lectures on Chicago history and musical programs. On Thursday, November 3, 2011, the Lecture Series will cover “The Architecture of Howard Van Doren Shaw.” For more information visit www.glessnerhouse.org.

Prairie Street has been re-developed with into a vibrant neighborhood with upscale modern housing, but her landmark buildings continue to be the backbone of this historic district.

There are other historical and architectural gems in the area between South Prairie Avenue and South Indiana Avenue. These residences were built from 1870 to 1900. Many important and notable families who were residents of Prairie, influenced the evolution of Chicago. They played a prominent national and international role in Chicago’s rise to a world-class city.

Recently, developments have extended the street north to accommodate new high-rise condominiums, such as One Museum Park, along Roosevelt Road (12th Street). The redevelopment has extended the street so that it has prominent buildings bordering Grant Park with Prairie Avenue addresses.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

High rises near Chicago's Prarie District in the South Loop

High rises near Chicago’s Prarie District in the South Loop

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