Tag Archives: Chianti

Travel to Tuscany’s Vino con Vista Wine Regions in Italy

The gallo nero seal of the Consorzio Chianti C...

Image via Wikipedia

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in ...

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti sub-zone

Chianti sub-zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico ...

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes ...

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes to be made into Chianti at the Colle Lungo vineyard in Castellina in Chianti, Tuscany, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuscany is Italy’s quintessential wine region and the birthplace of three important red wines: Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. These wines are made from Sangiovese grapes but have distinctively different flavors in Tuscany’s diverse microclimates.

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of...

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of Tuscany, home of the Sangiovese-based Vino Nobile di Montepulciano wine. The photo also demonstrates the viticultural technique of clear (or bare) cultivation that leaves bare soil between the vines and rows with no cover crops. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti is produced in seven subzones in Tuscany. The Chianti Classico zone has DOCG status. The other six Chianti subzones are: Chianti Rufina, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Aretini, Colli Senesi, Colline Pisane and Chianti Montalbano. The “Chiantigiana” is the scenic road that twists and turns through the Chianti zones between Florence and Siena.

Brunello is Tuscany’s rarest and most expensive wine. It is produced in the walled medieval village of Montalcino, south of the Chianti Classico zone. The climate is warmer and the hills are steeper. The wine is aged longer and it must be aged in oak barrels.

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 I...

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 Italian wine from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vino Nobile di Montepulciano has been made in the town of Montepulciano since Etruscan times. This wine is made from prugnolo grapes a sangiovese clone and was granted DOCG status in 1980.

Here’s Wine Spectator’s detailed overview map of Tuscany . The map includes: Chianti, Bolgheri, Brunello di Montalcino, Maremma and the Montepulciano appellations.

Click here to view the map: http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Tuscanymap.pdf

On February 27th, 2014 there was an annual award ceremony for the Best of Wine Tourism 2014 winners at Palazzo Capponi in Florence.

The winners were:

Castello di Gabbiano, San Felice winery, Enotria, Castello di Poppiano, Castello La Leccia, Tenuta di Poggio Casciano from Ruffino, Panzanello winery and Col d’Orcia.

“The stretch of coastline from Livorno to Piombino is known as the Etruscan Coast, the area chosen by the ancient Etruscan people to exploit the huge mining and agricultural resources.  Medieval jewels like the towns of Casale Marittimo and Bolgheri, famous for its Viale dei Cipressi (Cypresses), which gained everlasting fame thanks to the poem “Davanti a San Guido” by Giosuè Carducci, as well as Castagneto Carducci, dominated by the castle of the Gherardesca counts, and Suvereto, a medieval town with charming architectural harmony.

Visit the Etruscan Coast wine trail where you can meet most local wine producers and visit their cellars and vineyards. Here are some helpful links for this area:

To learn more about Italian food and wine read Vino con Vista Travel guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

iBookstore

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

8 Comments

Filed under Brunello di Montalcino, Chianti Classico, Florence, Italian Food, Italian Food and Wine, Italian Wine, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, Sangiovese, Sienna, Travel and Tourism, Tuscany, UNESCO, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

A Tuscan Winery Tour at Captivating Vino con Vista Castello Banfi in Montalcino Italy

A close-up view of sangiovese grapes to be mad...
Image via Wikipedia
Coat of arms of Montalcino

Coat of arms of Montalcino (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bottle & glass of a 1961 Brunello di Montelcin...

Bottle & glass of a 1961 Brunello di Montelcino wine from Tuscany. This Italian wine is made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Italian wine Brunello from Tuscany made fr...

The Italian wine Brunello from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Brunello vineyard, Montalcino

Brunello vineyard, Montalcino (Photo credit: Conlawprof)

Abbey of Sant'Antimo, Montalcino, Tuscany

Abbey of Sant’Antimo, Montalcino, Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sangiovese grapes in a vineyard of Montalcino,...

Sangiovese grapes in a vineyard of Montalcino, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuscany is Italy’s quintessential wine region. It is the birthplace of one of Italy’s blockbuster red wines, Brunello di Montalcino. This  is an opulent wine made entirely from sangiovese grapes. It has an intense ruby-red color and displays the complex aromas of black cherry, rasberry and violets.

English: The Municipality of Montalcino within...

English: The Municipality of Montalcino within the Province of Siena, Tuscany, Italy Italiano: Il comune di Montalcino nella Provincia di Siena, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montalcino is surrounded by defensive medieval walls that were built in the 13th century.

 Montalcino has remained practically unchanged over the centuries.

 

The Montalcino fortress was built at the highest point of the town in 1361; designed by the Sienese architects Mino Foresi and Domenico di Feo.

Montalcino is west of Pienza, close to the Crete Senesi in Val d’Orcia.

Montalcino is the perfect  destination for wine lovers with it’s 14th-century castle, encircled by olive groves and majestic vineyards.

Here’s a good link: A day trip to Montalcino

Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: littlestar19)

Castle (Fortezza) at Montalcino, Siena, Italy....

Castle (Fortezza) at Montalcino, Siena, Italy. Photo taken by Type17, 18:50hrs June 24th 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montalcino is divided into quarters called contrade. They are: Borghetto, Travaglio, Pianello and Ruga. Each contrade has their own colours, songs and distinct drum rhythms. Twice a year they dress in  Medieval attire and compete in an archery contest under the walls of the Castel Fortezza.

English: View of Montalcino from the Castle (F...

English: View of Montalcino from the Castle (Fortezza). Taken Sept 8th 2006 by me. Canon EOS 20D, 10mm focal length (16mm effective length) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: fondelli.nadia)

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Montalcino, take a Winery Tour of Castello Banfi. You will learn about the restrictive government regulations that prescribe wine-making practices in Italy. These rules define areas where specific wines can be made using the acronyms DOCG, DOC, and IGT.

Brunello di Montalcino earned a reputation as one of Italy’s rarest wines. At the end of WWII, the only commercial producer recorded in government documents was the Biondi-Santi. The high price and prestige of there Brunello de Montalcino encouraged other producers to emulate Biondi-Santi’s success. By the 1960s, there were 11 producers making Brunello. By 1980 there were 53 producers in Montalcino. In 1980, the Montalcino region was the first Italian wine region to be awarded Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) designation.

Português: Garrafa de vinho Brunello di Montal...

Português: Garrafa de vinho Brunello di Montalcino de Biondi Santi – 1985 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Brunello di Montalcino DOCG designation means  “Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita” (the most prestigious/elite Italian wines).  This means that the wine has the following characteristics:

The location is certified and guaranteed

Provides more stringent government regulations

Requires longer aging periods and lower yields per vine

montalcino fortress

montalcino fortress (Photo credit: tonyduckles)

Brunello is Tuscany’s rarest and most expensive wine. It is produced in the walled medieval village of Montalcino, south of the Chianti Classico zone. The climate is warmer and the hills are steeper. The wine is aged longer and it must be aged in oak barrels to enhance the character of the wines.

Tuscany

The Banfi Winery was the first winery in the world to be awarded international recognition for exceptional environmental, ethical and social responsibility. It won the 2009 VinItaly International Award and has been designated Italy’s Premier Vineyard estate for 11 consecutive years.

Tuscany

The winery is nestled on 7100 acres of land and it is owned by two wine-making brothers from Long Island, New York.

Tuscany

They have a state of the art winery with a glass museum.

Tuscany

Taste their Brunello di Montalcino at the Winery’s Enoteca.

Tuscany

Tuscany

 Dine at their Tuscan Taverna Tuscany

The restaurant is located in the vaulted cellars of the Castello. Enjoy three and five-course tasting menus of traditional Tuscan cooking on rustic wooden tables situated under gorgeous brick arches.

Tuscany

 You can even stay in the restored rooms and suites of the Castello Il Borgo.

Montalcino

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides to Italy andVino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in ...

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To learn more about wine tasting in Tuscany visit www.vino-con-vista.com. Florence and Tuscany now available for iPad. Salute!!

Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: Un ragazzo chiamato Bi)

Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: littlestar19)

Enhanced by Zemanta

10 Comments

Filed under Brunello Wine, ebooks, Italian Wine, Italy, Italy ravel, Italy Travel Guides, Monalcino, Montalcino, Tuscany, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

Monteriggioni Medieval Fair in Tuscany Italy

Chianti sub-zone

Chianti sub-zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Municipality of Monteriggioni wit...

English: The Municipality of Monteriggioni within the Province of Siena, Tuscany, Italy Italiano: Il comune di Monteriggioni nella Provincia di Siena, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Porta Franca - Monteriggioni, Italy I...

English: Porta Franca – Monteriggioni, Italy Italiano: Porta Franca – Monteriggioni (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Monteriggioni is one of the best-preserved medieval towns in Italy. It is surrounded by the lush Tuscan countryside of Chianti and the Val d’Elsa. Between 1244 and 1269, Florence tried many times to invade the town but they were not successful.

HISTORY: (from the official website)
“In the year 1000, Monteriggioni was a thriving town. The castle however, wasn’t built till 1213. It was built by the Republic of Siena who wanted it to be a kind of defensive outpost on the main road between Florence and Siena. It was one of the first castles built by the Sienese who, until then, had always used the fortresses of weak feudal families.
THE CASTLE:
This castle has two large entrances, one known as ‘romea’ which opened onto the road to Siena and another that faced Florence. The castle had several important defensive elements, such as the ‘carbonaie’ which were kept full of coal and could be set alight when needed in order to keep the enemy far from the castle walls. There are portcullises, towers and a second entrance that creates an anti-chamber for the Fiorentina Gate.”
“During the XIV century, the castle and surrounding town remained firmly in the hands of Siena, despite being weakened by the plague and an attempted invasion by a group of Sienese exiles in 1383 which failed due to lack of support from Florence. Nonetheless, the invention of gunpowder and the subsequent creation of the artillery made the castle much more vulnerable to attack. The walls were lowered and the ‘carbonaie’ were eliminated. Monteriggioni modernised its structure and was able to withstand the siege of 1554 by Papal troops who were historical allies of the Florentine Republic. However, shortly after this success, the town was betrayed by Captain Zeti who basically handed the town over to the Florentines without any kind of battle having to take place. This totally altered the balance between Florence and Siena and Florentine Medici troops were able to go on to take over the Sienese Republic.
The inhabitants of the castle were utterly humiliated and deported. The region came under the rule of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany and stayed that way right up to the unification of Italy. Over the following centuries the castle belonged to various noteworthy families until it was bought in 1704 by the Griccioli family.
Today, the same family still owns several properties both inside and outside the town’s walls.”

Monteriggioni’s fortress has fourteen magnificent towers. Enter through the Franca or San Giovanni Door.  The main square is called Piazza Roma where you can visit the Church of Santa Maria Assunta. There is a museum with replicas of medieval and Renaissance arms and armatures.

 

Visit the Medieval festival in Tuscany! Townspeople dress in historical costumes and you can watch tournaments between thirteenth century knights. The fortress of Monteriggioni will be cloaked with “jesters, street artists, jugglers, men on stilts, musicians and minstrels.” You will use ancient coins that have been minted in Lucca.

 

Monteriggioni is (8.6 miles) from Siena ,  (15.5 miles) from San Gimignano, and (41 miles) from Florence.

 

 

PRICES

 

  • Adults: Euro 8,00 (Friday), Euro 12,00 (Saturday) Euro 10,00 (Sunday)
  • Reduced price for residents, over 65, boys&girls from 11 to 16: Euro 6,00 (Friday), Euro 10,00 (Saturday) Euro 8,00 (Sunday)
  • 0-12 years old: free

INFO

 

WHEN: (2015 edition)

 

  • June 27, 28
  • July 3-5, 10-12

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Italy Travel Guides

Have a Feast in Fiesole Italy near Florence

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in ...

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Florence as seen from Fiesole.

Florence as seen from Fiesole. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

View to Fiesole in Florence, Italy
Image via Wikipedia
Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Thermae. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of...

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of Tuscany, home of the Sangiovese-based Vino Nobile di Montepulciano wine. The photo also demonstrates the viticultural technique of clear (or bare) cultivation that leaves bare soil between the vines and rows with no cover crops. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bistecca alla fiorentina

Bistecca alla fiorentina (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Theater. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Thermae. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Thermae. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Temples. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Thermae. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. ...

Fiesole archaeological site, Florence, Italy. Temples. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fiesole is in the province of Florence in Tuscany. It was a former Etruscan settlement. It is nestled on a hilly ridge 30 minutes north of Florence. It’s position offers a breath-taking view of Florence.

Head for tranquil Fiesole for lunch or dinner at Trattoria Le Cave de Maiano. Order a veal chop or the famous “Bistecca alla Fiorentina” (Florentine T-Bone) from Tuscany’s famed Chianina beef and a bottle of Bolgheri Rosso, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano or Brunello di Montalcino.  Dine at La Reggia degli ‘Etrusci‘s terrace for a fabulous “Vino con Vista”.

Visit the Piazza Mino de Fiesole, the main square, and have an expresso at the Caffe Aurora in the bougainvillea shaded terrace with a fabulous view of Florence.  Take a picture with the bronze statue of Garibaldi and Victor Emmanuel II.

Roman theater in Fiesole, Italy

Roman theater in Fiesole, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Explore the 14th century Franciscan Friary of San Francesco with a presepi on display all year long. Visit the Archeological area in the first century BC Roman theater,  public baths and a 4th century Etruscan temple.  The temple is dedicated to Minerva, the goddess of wisdom and healing.

Stay at Villa San Michele in Fiesole and ask for the Michelangelo Suite. This Orient Express property was a former 15th century monastery that was designed by Michelangelo. Fabulous cooking classes are only available to hotel guests with “Guest Chefs” from many other world-class hotels www.villasanmichele.com. Another option is Italy’s Top Spa (19 miles northwest of Florence) www.termemontecatini.it.  After your spa treatment, take the Funicular to Montecatini Alto for a panoramic vista all the way to Florence.

see above

see above (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

see above

see above (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To learn more about Italy read www.vino-con-vista.com Travel Guides and

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

3 Comments

Filed under Ancient Rome, Brunello di Montalcino, Brunello Wine, Chianti Classico, Christmas in Italy, ebooks, Fiesole, Fiesole Italy, Florence, Franciscans, IPad, Italian Architecture, Italian art, Italian Food, Italian Food and Wine, Italian Wine, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, oenogastronomic, Roman Amphitheater, Roman Architecture, Travel and Tourism, Tuscany, vino con vista

De-Mystify Italian Wine by Viewing a Wine Map

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 I...

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 Italian wine from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in the Italian wine region of Tuscan...

Vineyards in the Italian wine region of Tuscany in mid November. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nottola Vino Nobile di Montepulciano

Nottola Vino Nobile di Montepulciano (Photo credit: Bernt Rostad)

A wine barrel with a cross on it designating t...

A wine barrel with a cross on it designating that it is being used to aged the Italian dessert wine Vin Santo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Português: Garrafa de vinho Brunello di Montal...

Português: Garrafa de vinho Brunello di Montalcino de Biondi Santi – 1985 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes ...

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes to be made into Chianti at the Colle Lungo vineyard in Castellina in Chianti, Tuscany, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of...

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of Tuscany, home of the Sangiovese-based Vino Nobile di Montepulciano wine. The photo also demonstrates the viticultural technique of clear (or bare) cultivation that leaves bare soil between the vines and rows with no cover crops. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italian Wine can be incredibly confusing if you don’t look at a Regional Wine Map. Here is a Wine Spectator Map of Tuscany:

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Tuscanymap.pdf

The map will help you to understand noteable wine regions in Tuscany. Tuscany is in central Italy along the Tyrrhenian Coast. Some wine regions are closer to the sea and other regions are further inland. This is an important point to remember! Livorno, Bolgheri and Grosseto are coastal areas.

Tuscan Wine tasting seminar

Tuscan Wine tasting seminar (Photo credit: cizauskas)

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sangiovese grapes thrive in this region. They are used to produce Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Follow this link to the “Strada del Vino Nobile di Montepulciano”:

http://www.stradavinonobile.it/

 

Sangiovese grapes on the vine in the Italian w...

Sangiovese grapes on the vine in the Italian wine region of Chianti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti and Chianti Classico are separate designations. Classico is produced between Florence and Siena: Colli Senesi is produced in the Province of Siena and Colli Fiorentini is produced in the province of Florence.

The Carmignano area is west of Florence and the Chianti Rufina area is east of Florence.

Tuscany 2008

Tuscany 2008 (Photo credit: mzarro)

Italy - Vernaccia di San Gimignano 1978

Italy – Vernaccia di San Gimignano 1978 (Photo credit: roger4336)

Chianti sub-zone

Chianti sub-zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vernaccia grapes are used to produce Vernaccia di San Gimignano and Vin Santo. They are both produced in the province of Siena.

The Italian wine Vin Santo with its traditiona...

The Italian wine Vin Santo with its traditional food pairing of Biscotti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carmignano is a blend of Sangiovese and Cabernet Savignon and sometimes Cabernet Franc produced in the provinces of Florence and Prato; a precursor to the “Super Tuscan” from the Bolgheri Region in the Livorno Province.

Italian Super Tuscan wine from Tenuta San Guido

Italian Super Tuscan wine from Tenuta San Guido (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Italian wine region of Carmignano in Tuscany

The Italian wine region of Carmignano in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italian wine from the Bolgheri region of Tuscany

Italian wine from the Bolgheri region of Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Morellino di Scansano comes from southern Tuscany in Maremma; produced in the province of Grosseto.

Join me for a Vino con Vista through Italy’s magnificent wine regions @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com

Vino con VIsta in Florence  Italy

Vino con VIsta in Florence Italy

English: Map of Italy and its districts.

English: Map of Italy and its districts. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Chianti Classico Gallo Nero (black roast) ...

The Chianti Classico Gallo Nero (black roast) label – Pic credits Consorzio del Vino Chianti Classico (Photo credit: Tuscanycious)

Enhanced by Zemanta

4 Comments

Filed under De-Mystify Italian Wine by Viewing a Wine Map

The Best Vino con Vista Wine Tourism Adventures in Italy’s Major Wine Regions with Italian Wine Maps

Vineyards in Gaiole in Chianti in the Chianti ...

Vineyards in Gaiole in Chianti in the Chianti Classico region (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Asiago

Asiago (Photo credit: Birnardo)

If you follow my posts, you know that I adore Italy’s intoxicating Vino con Vistas! Italy is one of the world’s most alluring travel destinations with captivating panoramic vistas of majestic mountains and volcanoes surrounded by the glistening sea.

Chianti classico

Chianti classico (Photo credit: Marco Piso)

La collina di Bacco

La collina di Bacco (Photo credit: gigi 62)

I am an advocate of Wine Tourism and Culinary Travel. I even write Travel Guides called “Vino con Vista.” I have traveled the peninsula and identified my favorite places to enjoy “Wine with a View.”

Vineyards in Gaiole in Chianti in the Chianti ...

Vineyards in Gaiole in Chianti in the Chianti Classico region (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The micro-climates of regions from Piedmont to Sicily provide the nations’s wine producers with abundant resources and endless opportunities to produce highly regarded wines. There are over 300 varietals cultivated across the peninsula from the foothills to the southermost islands. Wine tourim is enhanced by the nation’s flourishing culinary culture that spawns superb cooking schools and world-class gourmet farm-to-fork chefs.

Tuscany, Italian wine region of Chianti

Tuscany, Italian wine region of Chianti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Vin Santo e Cantucci in Milan, Italy.

English: Vin Santo e Cantucci in Milan, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My favorite wine always pairs well with art, architecture and the best age-old culinary traditions; think Vin Santo with cantucci/biscotti while watching the Palio in Siena; that’s a Vino con Vista. I take great pleasure in the fact that Trebbiano grapes are used to produce wine that has been aged in a barrel with a cross on it. That’s the inherent charm of Italy.

Many towns, such as San Gimignano, were enclos...

Many towns, such as San Gimignano, were enclosed with walls, causing crowding and the building of tower houses. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thick, sugary Trebbiano juice leaving the bask...

Thick, sugary Trebbiano juice leaving the basket press from dried Trebbiano grapes being used to produce the Italian dessert wine Vin Santo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Italian wine Vin Santo with its traditiona...

The Italian wine Vin Santo with its traditional food pairing of Biscotti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A wine barrel with a cross on it designating t...

A wine barrel with a cross on it designating that it is being used to aged the Italian dessert wine Vin Santo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Yes,  I love wine that pairs with indigenous food. Although, I must admit that I have paired gelato with wine in San Gimignano; there’s no shame to that! Just don’t try it with Chianti Classico. I have been reprimanded by many Italian waiters for requesting grated cheese for my seafood pasta. They absolutely refuse; so I have to sneak grated cheese from my friends that are having pasta without seafood.

Late harvest grapes being harvested to produce...

Late harvest grapes being harvested to produce the Italian dessert wine Vin Santo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My travel plans frequently involve Wine and Food Festivals. Wine is produced and celebrated everywhere in Italy’s 20 regions. It’s a great place for touring and tasting.

Loading raisin grapes that have even been drie...

While Vin Santo wines are produced throughout ...

While Vin Santo wines are produced throughout Italy, the vast majority of production takes place in the provinces of Tuscany. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Production of the Italian straw wine, Vin Sant...

Production of the Italian straw wine, Vin Santo, begining with Trebbiano being dried until they are raisin and concentrated with sugar. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Agriturismo system is conducive to wine tourism because it provides accommodations for tourists at the wine estate. In addition, monasteries and castles have been converted into five-star hotels in many of Italy’s wine regions. Azienda Agricola Malenchini’s family run farm has been growing grapes and olives since 1830 www.malenchini.com.

I visited the Dievole Winery during one of my trips to Tuscany but next time, I will stay at the luxury Florentine Villa with two pools www.dievole.it. Go to Castello da Verrazzano and visit the historical working cellars and gaze at the wild boars www.verrazano.com. Visit Ristorante Enoteca Borgo Allegro with 400 labels of the best Italian and Tuscan wines www.borgoallegro.it

Italy's WIne Regions

Italy’s WIne Regions

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Brunello di Montalcino 2000 -  Il Marroneto - ...

Brunello di Montalcino 2000 – Il Marroneto – Vigna Madonna delle Grazie (Photo credit: dags1974)

Cantine Aperte is held on the last Sunday of May and offers outstanding opportunities for anyone interested in Italian wine. This is the day when many wine producers throughout Italy open their doors for a free tasting of their wines. There’s a great four-day annual Chianti Wine Festival in the town of Greve in Tuscany. http://www.greve-in-chianti.com/en/2010_wine_festival.htm
Tuscany is the home of Italy’s most famous wines made with Sangiovese grapes: Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino.
Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: littlestar19)

Brunello de Montalcino

Brunello de Montalcino

When you travel to Italy’s wine regions you can visit Col d’Orcia. They have been making wine since the 17oos. This producer is located on 1300 acres in Tuscany’s Siena province on the outskirts of the medieval hilltop village of Montalcino.  The vineyards occupy 370 acres on the hills between the Orcia River and Sant’Angelo in Colle. Col d’Orcia is owned by Count Francesco Marone Cinzano and primarily produces the Brunello clone of Sangiovese.

Brunello de Montalcino

Brunello de Montalcino

Italian wine region of Piedmont

Italian wine region of Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are many interesting regions in Italy for Touring and Tasting. You can visit Piedmont, Tuscany and many of Italy’s major wine regions, from Alto Aidge in the north to Puglia and Campania in the south. You can travel to the islands of Sardinia and Sicily for more Wine Tourism Adventures. Furthermore, Apulia (Puglia), in the South of Italy is known for Primitivo and is emerging as an interesting destination for Enoturism. For more information, visit ViaggiareinPuglia.it.

Italian wine

Italian wine (Photo credit: toyohara)

In the Italian wine region of Piedmont

In the Italian wine region of Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Click on this link to see the Wine Spectator Maps of Italy: http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Italymap.pdf

Let’s explore some of Italy’s wine regions:

A food and wine pairing with the Italian wine ...

A food and wine pairing with the Italian wine Amarone from Valpolicella, Veneto. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The north-eastern Venato region of Italy is protected by the Alps. The cooler climates are suited to white varietals like Garganega; the warmer Adriatic coastal plaines produce Amarone, Valpolicella and Bardolino. Sparkling Prosecco is produced in this region.

Conegliano is one of Italy’s leading wine schools in this region. Every year, Verona hosts Vinitaly, the world’s leading Wine Festival.

Prosecco

An interesting range of wines which are unique to Italy are made with grapes that are dried in the warm air by laying them out on mats after harvesting. These recioto grapes make two basic styles of wine: Amarone della Valpolicella, which is vinified to be dry and very alcoholic and Recioto.

A Vineyard in the Italian wine region of Valpo...

A Vineyard in the Italian wine region of Valpolicella in the Veneto. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Amarone

Amarone

Casa Vinicola Bertani is one on the region’s most influential wine producers. Bertani was founded in 1857 by Gaetano and Giovani Battista Bertani. They are vertically integrated; they own the vineyards and control the entire wine-making cycle.

In 2004, the winter was cold and wet with an average spring. Summer was characterized by warm days and cool nights allowing for optimal ripening. The wine was aged in oak casks for 7 years and bottled in January of 2011.

Amarone

1980 Bertani Amarone della Valpolicella Classico from the Venato

The 1980 Spring had average temperatures and precipitation with a hot, dry summer. Yields were lower but fruit quality was high. The wine was fermented for 46 days and aged for 10 years in large Slovonian oak barrels. The wine was bottled in February of 1991.

Nebbiolo has a long history in the Alba region...

Nebbiolo has a long history in the Alba region of Piedmont. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Amarone

Italian wine

Italian wine (Photo credit: toyohara)

Ripasso and Recioto are also produced in the Venato; fermentation is stopped earlier for Recioto to capture sweetness. Try some Amarones and Reciotos from wineries like Alighieri, Masi and Allegrini.

English: Barolo, Piedmont, Italy - the village...

English: Barolo, Piedmont, Italy – the village Italiano: Barolo, Piemonte, Italia – il paese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barolo

Barolo (Photo credit: verovera78)

The subregion of Piedmont called Langhe, is where the wines of Barolo and Barbaresco are produced. Piedmont produces complex red wines made from Nebbiolo grapes in the Barolo and Barbaresco appellations. Traditionally these wines age well and have an intense fruit flavor.

Other Piedmontese wines include: fruity Barbera and sweet Brachetto and Dolcetto. Sparkling Asti is made from the Moscato grape.

Produttori del Barbaresco - Barbaresco Docg 2006

In the Italian wine region of Piedmont

In the Italian wine region of Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cerretto, Gaja, Aldo Conterno and Giacosa are prominent producers in this area. Visit Cerretto’s headquarters at the Monsordo Bernadina winery outside Alba and then go to the town of Alba and have lunch at Ristorante La Piola in the Piazza Duomo. Alba is a picturesque medieval village that also produces Barbera.

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Piedmontmap.pdf

Ceretto - Barbaresco

Ceretto – Barbaresco “Asij” Docg 2007 (Photo credit: Doyouwine)

Italian wine made from Nebbiolo in Piedmont

Italian wine made from Nebbiolo in Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the heart of Sicily

the heart of Sicily (Photo credit: Chiara Marra)

I love Sicily. Start your adventure in Palermo and travel to the wineries in Avola and the other beautiful towns in Southern Sicily. Visit the D0nna Fuggata Winery in Sicily. You will also adore Palermo, Cefalu, Taormina and the Aeolian Islands!

Vino Con Vista Sicily

Sicily 2009

Sicily 2009 (Photo credit: mad_76)

Sicily has a plethora of interesting sites and produces a broad array of bold wines. Have some Nero d’Avola as you watch a movie in the Greco-Roman Theater at the annual Taormina Film Festival. Spend the weekend at the luxurious San Domenico

Palace hotel, a former 15th century monastery.

Visit the Late Baroque towns in Southeastern Sicily where yau can tour and taste in the town of Avola. Dine at La Gazza Landra on Via Blandini in Modica ALta.

Vino Con Vista AmalfiCampania is another outstanding Vino con Vista destination. The smoldering volcano that destroyed Pompeii and Herculanuem generated fertile volcanis soil for growing grapes, lemons and olives. Pallagrello Nero, Aglianico, Biancolella and Fiano grapes are used to produce sumptuous wines in this region. Sip some Lacryma Christi del Bianco or Flanghina wine from your lounge chair at the beach or on your splendid terrace in the Amalfi Coast. This region produces plenty of limoncello.
Terraza del Vino 7

Terraza del Vino 7 (Photo credit: BodegaContiempo)

Italian wine region of Piedmont

Italian wine region of Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Piedmontmap.pdf

Ceretto - Barbaresco "Asij" Docg 2007

Ceretto – Barbaresco “Asij” Docg 2007 (Photo credit: Doyouwine)

Italian wine made from Nebbiolo in Piedmont

Italian wine made from Nebbiolo in Piedmont (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the heart of Sicily

the heart of Sicily (Photo credit: Chiara Marra)

I love Sicily. Start your adventure in Palermo and travel to the wineries in Avola and the other beautiful towns in Southern Sicily. Visit the D0nna Fuggata Winery in Sicily. You will also adore Cefalu, Taormina and the Aeolian Islands!

Sicily has a plethora of interesting sites and produces a broad array of bold wines.

Vino Con Vista Sicily

Vino con Vista Sicily

Giuseppe Garibaldi - Portrait of an Italian Pa...

Giuseppe Garibaldi – Portrait of an Italian Patriot with Red Wine & Cabbage (Photo credit: Nino.Modugno)

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Sicilymap.pdf

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino

Italian Wine

Italian Wine

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 I...

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 Italian wine from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Brolio

Sangiovese grapes in a vineyard of Montalcino,...

Sangiovese grapes in a vineyard of Montalcino, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuscany is one of the most popular destinations for wine tourism. You can visit the Chianti, Bolgheri, Brunello di Montalcino, Maremma and the Montepulciano appellation.

2006 Castello Banfi Belnero Toscana, I.G.T. fr...

2006 Castello Banfi Belnero Toscana, I.G.T. from Montalcino (Photo credit: Michal Osmenda)

The Montepulciano grape is most widely planted on the opposite coast of Abruzzo; not the town of Montepulciano in Tuscany where Vino Nobile di Montepulciano is made from Sangiovese grapes. The Vernaccia grape is used for white Vernaccia de San Gimignano.

Abbey of Sant'Antimo, Montalcino, Tuscany

Abbey of Sant’Antimo, Montalcino, Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A good example of the Italian wine Brunello di...

A good example of the Italian wine Brunello di Montalcino with partial Sangiovese cluster behind class. Just need to crop out the chickens. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti and the towns of Montalcino and Montepulciano are the wine-producing regional rock stars in Tuscany!

The gallo nero seal of the Consorzio Chianti C...

The gallo nero seal of the Consorzio Chianti Classico (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuscany Cipresses

Tuscany Cipresses (Photo credit: Maarten Van Hoof)

English: Castle (Fortezza) at Montalcino, Sien...

English: Castle (Fortezza) at Montalcino, Siena, Italy. Photo taken by Type17, 18:50hrs June 24th 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The best quality wines are the Riservas.

They generally come from Sangiovese grapes in the Chianti  Classico zone, which stretches from Florence to Siena. Try wines from Antinori, Castell’in Villa, San Felice and Isole e Olena. Try to attend the annual Chianti festival in the charming town of Greve in Tuscany.

Landscape in the Italian wine region of Greve ...

Landscape in the Italian wine region of Greve in the Chianti area in Tuscany, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico ...

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti sub-zone

Chianti sub-zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Italian wine Brunello from Tuscany made fr...

The Italian wine Brunello from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sangiovese grapes on the vine in the Italian w...

Sangiovese grapes on the vine in the Italian wine region of Chianti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Tuscanymap.pdf

Chianti Classico

Montalcino

Montalcino (Photo credit: littlestar19)

English: The Municipality of Montalcino within...

English: The Municipality of Montalcino within the Province of Siena, Tuscany, Italy Italiano: Il comune di Montalcino nella Provincia di Siena, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: View of Montalcino from the Castle (F...

English: View of Montalcino from the Castle (Fortezza). Taken Sept 8th 2006 by me. Canon EOS 20D, 10mm focal length (16mm effective length) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rome‘s Wine Tourism is increasing. The Roman Hills and Frascati offer excellent Vino con Vista opportunities.

Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio ...

Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 189v – The Communion of the Apostles the Musée Condé, Chantilly. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Frascati

Frascati (Photo credit: twicepix)

Franciacorta

Prosecco

Beschreibung: Kiste mit Tignanello-Flaschen – ...

Beschreibung: Kiste mit Tignanello-Flaschen – eine Kostbarkeit. Fotograf: Benutzer:BMK 8/2004 Please send reference and voucher copy to BMK(at)clever.ms Bitte Quellenangabe und Beleg an BMK(at)clever.ms (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bottles of Sassicaia

Bottles of Sassicaia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italian Wine

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in ...

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Map of Italy and its districts.

English: Map of Italy and its districts. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There an annual fall wine festival in Greve in Chianti from September 6-9, 2012. Greve is on the Via Chiantigiana; the Chianti route to Siena. The Festival is held in Piazza Matteotti.

City Lights, France-Italy Border (NASA, Intern...

City Lights, France-Italy Border (NASA, International Space Station Science, 04/28/10) (Photo credit: NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)

I love Italy’s Wine Regions @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Related Articles:

Enhanced by Zemanta

17 Comments

Filed under Italy Travel Guides, The Best Vino con Vista Wine Tourism Adventures in Italy's Major Wine Regions with Italian Wine Maps, Wine Spectator's List and Maps of Italy's Major Wine Regions, Wine Spectator's Maps of Italy's Major Wine Regions, Wine Tourism Adventures in Italy's Major Wine Regions

Chicago’s Coco Pazzo Celebrates Italian Wine Week with Free Wine at Lunch

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 I...

Image via Wikipedia

Make reservations for lunch at Coco Pazzo to celebrate their 20th anniversary and to honor Italian Wine Week. They will be dipping into their impressive wine collection with free table-side pours of select wines during lunch service from January 23rd to 27th. In addition, all bottles on Coco Pazzo’s wine list will be 20 % off their regular price during both lunch and dinner.

Here’s a list of the wine director’s list (a tentative “schedule”—subject to change):

 

Monday, January 23, 2012
Prosecco Foss Marai, Veneto
Bianchetta Genovese Bisson Golfo del Tigullio, Liguria 2010
Chardonnay De Forville, Piemonte 2010
Saracco Pinot Noir, Piemonte 2008
Barbaresco Pallazina Montaribaldi Piemonte 2006
Carpineto Farnito Cabernet Sauvignon, Toscana 2006
Brunello di Montalcino Caparzo 2006

Tuesday, January 24
Chardonnay Bramito Antinori, Toscana 2010
Peppoli, Chianti Classico 2007
Il Brusciato Tenuta Guado Al Tasso -Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot/Syrah IGT Toscana 2009
Guado al Tasso Tenuta Belvedere Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot/Syrah IGT Toscana 2007
Primitivo Torcioda, Tormaresca, Puglia 2008

Wednesday, January 25
Ca’ del Bosco Brut NV Franciacorta, Lombardia
Sauvignon Blanc Sanct Vlentin St. Michael Eppan, Alto Adige 2010
Greco di Tufo Terradora Dipaolo, Campania 2010
Argiano Non Confunditur Cabernet/Merlot/Syrah/Sangiovese, Montalcino 2008
Cesanese del Piglio Corte dei Papi Lazio 2008
Castello di Ama Chianti Classico 2007

Thursday, January 26
Bella vista Brut NV Franciacorta Lombardia
Soave Pieropan
Ribolla Gialla Vinnae, Jermann
Pancrazi Pinot Noir
Dolcetto Einaudi
Poggio Argenteria Morellino di Scansano, Maremma, Toscana 2010

Friday, January 27
Allegrini Palazzo della Torre IGT Veronese Fattoria Le Pupille Morellino di Scansano DOCG 2009
Maculan Palazzotto 2008
Argiolas Costamolino Vermentino di Sardegna DOC 2010

Reservations are encouraged for lunch and dinner during Italian Wine Week. More information about Coco Pazzo’s 20th anniversary festivities is available on the Special Events page of the restaurant’s website, including details on the gala benefit it’s hosting to support the Lyric Opera of Chicago, slated to take place on February 2nd.

Coco Pazzo is located at 300 West Hubbard Street 312-836-0900

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 Comments

Filed under Attractions in Chicago, Chicago, Chicago Charity Events, Chicago Chefs, Chicago Events, Chicago Restaurants, Chicago Wine Events, Coco Pazzo in Chicago celebrates Italian Wine Week

Gioco Restaurant’s Winter Wine Event in Chicago

Organic Italian Wine from Tuscany

Image via Wikipedia

WHAT: Chef Gaetano Ascione and Gioco invite Chicagoans to join them for their first ever Winter Wine Affair, an open-house tasting featuring more than 100 different kinds of Italian wines.  After the tasting, Chef Gaetano suggests that patrons make a reservation and stay for dinner to try his newly updated Italian menu.  Additionally, guests will have the unique opportunity to purchase the wines tasted for a one-time only special price.                         

Reservations are required, call Gioco 312.939.3870. 

Featured wines, among the 100, include: La Scolca Gavi, Pieropan Soave Classico, Guado al Tasso Vermentino, Antinori Bramito Chardonnay, La Braccesca Syrah Bramasole, Marchesi di Antinori Chianti, Terrabianca Campaccio, Travaglini Gattinara, Gaja Promis, Pian delle Vigne Brunello di Montalcino

WHEN: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 from 6:00 – 8:00 PM

WHERE:

Gioco
1312 S Wabash Ave
Chicago, IL 60605
312.939.3870 
 
Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com
 
Enhanced by Zemanta

9 Comments

Filed under Attractions in Chicago, Chicago, Chicago Restaurant Events, Chicago Restaurants, Italian Food, Italian Food and Wine, Italian restaurants in Chicago, Italian Wine, Italy