Tag Archives: Arts

Sumptuous Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona Spain: Cathedral of the Sea

Gothic Church of Santa Maria del Mar

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona SpainI love the Sumptuous Santa Maria dei Mar cathedral in Barcelona Spain; also known as Cathedral of the Sea in Catalonia.

Catalonia was part of the great Aragonese maritime power and at one time it was one of the most prosperous cities in the Mediterranean. The foundation stone of the church was laid by King Alfonso IV of Aragon and the Catalan Gothic church was built between 1329 and 1383. In 1428 an earthquake destroyed the rose window on the west end of the church. It was replaced in the 15th century with a Gothic window. Outside the church, visit the trendy Passeig del Born with plenty of shopping and Vino con Vista opportunities.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes travel guides at www.vino-con-vista.com.
 

Barcelona Spain Santa Maria del Mar

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Halloween Happenings at Chicago’s Glessner House Museum Historic Prairie Avenue

The John J. Glessner House by Henry Hobson Ric...

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Prairie Avenue has always been influential in Chicago’s History with grand mansions and influential residents. During the late 19th century, Chicago’s most prestigious residential street was Prairie Avenue.

William W. Kimball Home on Chicago's Prairie District

William W. Kimball Home on Chicago’s Prairie Street Historic District

Prairie Avenue is located in Chicago’s South Loop neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago. The Prairie Avenue District is a Chicago Landmark district and was added to the National Register of Historic Places. During the Columbian Exposition, Prairie Street was considered a “Must See” destination. I love the chateaux style residence at 1802 S. Prairie, formerly owned by the owner of the Kimball Piano and Organ Company. It was designed by the architect Solon S. Beman. Today, it serves as the headquarters for the U.S. Soccer Federation.

Halloween Happenings:

Tour:  Shadows on the Street – Haunted Tours of Historic Prairie Avenue

Friday October 30 and Saturday October 31, 2015

Tours at 7:00 and 8:15pm

Tours begin at the Glessner House Museum Vistors Center

$10 per person / $8 for members

Pre-paid reservations suggested to 312.326.1480

Tales of strange sounds, unexplained sightings, and untimely endings as you explore Prairie Avenue after dark!

Performance:  29th Annual Edgar Allan Poe Readings

Saturday October 31, 2015

Readings at 5:00 and 8:00pm

Clarke House Museum, 1827 S. Indiana Avenue

$25 per person / $22 for members

Pre-paid reservations required to 312.326.1480

Squirm in your seat as actors from Lifeline Theatre present staged readings of Poe’s terrifying stories and poetry.  A holiday favorite now in its 29th year!

Another one of my favorites is the brown sandstone Joseph G. Coleman House by the architects Cobb & Frost at 1811 S. Prairie.

Joseph G. Coleman House at 1811 S. Prairie in Chicago

Joseph G. Coleman House at 1811 S. Prairie in Chicago

Several of  Chicago’s most notable families and  important historical figures have lived in the South Loop Prairie Avenue District. Today the street is full of new construction that blends into the style of the existing historic landmarks.

Empire style Elbridge G. Keith House at 1900 S. Prairie

Empire style Elbridge G. Keith House at 1900 S. Prairie

Many wealthy Chicago “Movers and Shakers” moved to Prairie Street after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Some of the prominent families that lived here included: the Pullmans, the Fields, the Armours and the Kimballs. When Philip Armour joined Field and Pullman on Prairie Street in 1875, Chicago’s three wealthiest citizens lived within a four block stretch of this historic neighborhood. These prominent Chicago legends influenced the  political history, the architecture, the culture, the economy, as well as the law and government of Chicago. Prairie Street lost some of its luster as the neighborhood became more industrialized and the demographics of Chicago changed over time. The Gold Coast and the North Shore became the more desirable areas for Chicago’s wealthy residents.

Although most of the houses have been demolished, you can still tour the 17,000 square foot Glessner House at 1800 S. Prairie.  It was designed in 1885-1886 by Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in late 1887. The granite fortress-like exterior conceals a large central courtyard.

Original Front Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue in Chicago

Original Front Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue in Chicago

The property was designated a Chicago Landmark on October 14, 1970. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and as a National Historic Landmark on January 7, 1976. It’s possible to have a wedding at this historic residence in the lovely courtyard.

The Glessner House Courtyard on Prairie Avenue

The Glessner House Courtyard on Prairie Avenue

Many newlyweds like to have their pictures taken at the “G” Door. If you turn the entrance to the staircase around, it forms the letter “G”.

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

John Glessner was one of the original founders of International Harvester, which became the fourth largest corporation in the country. Glessner was appointed vice president and continued in that capacity until his death in 1936 at the age of 92.

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

The G Door of the Glessner House on Prairie Avenue

When Frances and  John J. Glessner and his family needed a winter house in Chicago, Mr. Glessner decided to build a home for his family on Prairie Avenue and 18th Street. He chose one of the nation’s foremost architects, H. H. Richardson.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson note to Mr. Glessner

Henry Hobson Richardson (September 29, 1838 – April 27, 1886) was born in Louisiana and became a prominent American architect. His portrait hangs in the foyer of the Glessner House, surrounded by oak walls and a stately fireplace.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson

Richardson’s work had an impact on Boston, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Albany, and Chicago. The style that Richardson developed over time was medieval and fortress-like. His contributions are called Richardsonian Romanesque. He inspired Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright.

H. H. Richardson

H. H. Richardson

Richardson studied at Harvard College and Tulane University. Initially he was interested in civil engineering, but eventually shifted to architecture. His passion led him to Paris in 1860 where he attended the famed École des Beaux Arts in the atelier of Louis-Jules André. He was the second US citizen to attend the École des Beaux Arts. Richard Morris Hunt was the first American student. The French School played an increasingly important role in training American architects. Trinity Church in Boston built in 1872, is Richardson’s most acclaimed early work. This church solidified his reputation and provided major commissions for him for the remainder of his life.

The Glessner House interior on Prairie Avenue

The Glessner House interior on Prairie Avenue

Take a guided tour of the elegant interior of the house that Richardson designed. It  was rescued from demolition in 1966. It has been lovingly restored and is furnished with many of the original “Arts and Crafts” period furniture and an extraordinary collection of pottery and decorative arts.

Glessner House restored Parlor with pottery

Glessner House restored Parlor with pottery

Glessner House pottery

Glessner House pottery

I love the elaborate tiles on the fireplaces in this house and the piano that was returned to the house from the President of Harvard University.

Glessner House restored fireplace

Glessner House restored fireplace

Glessner House original Parlor Piano

Glessner House original Parlor Piano

The Eastlake style furniture was designed by Isaac Elwood Scott. The lavish parlor of the Glessner House Museum was restored recently with generous gifts from patrons including the Bunny J. Selig Memorial fund and the Aileen Mandel Memorial Fund. The dedication ceremony was held on October 14, 2011.

Afterwards, architect and historian John H. Waters presented a lecture on the contirbutions of William Pretyman. Pretyman produced the original wallcovering in the Glessner parlor.

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

Glessner House restored Parlor

The Museum offers a variety of programs to the public including lectures on Chicago history and musical programs. On Thursday, November 3, 2011, the Lecture Series will cover “The Architecture of Howard Van Doren Shaw.” For more information visit www.glessnerhouse.org.

Prairie Street has been re-developed with into a vibrant neighborhood with upscale modern housing, but her landmark buildings continue to be the backbone of this historic district.

There are other historical and architectural gems in the area between South Prairie Avenue and South Indiana Avenue. These residences were built from 1870 to 1900. Many important and notable families who were residents of Prairie, influenced the evolution of Chicago. They played a prominent national and international role in Chicago’s rise to a world-class city.

Recently, developments have extended the street north to accommodate new high-rise condominiums, such as One Museum Park, along Roosevelt Road (12th Street). The redevelopment has extended the street so that it has prominent buildings bordering Grant Park with Prairie Avenue addresses.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

High rises near Chicago's Prarie District in the South Loop

High rises near Chicago’s Prarie District in the South Loop

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Alghero’s Cathedral of Santa Maria in Italy

Catalan Gothic cathedral's bell tower in Alghe...

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Alghero is a beautiful coastal city of medieval origin situated in the northwestern coral coast of Sardinia. This town is 300 miles off the coast of Spain near Barcelona. They speak Italian as well as Catalan.

The recently refurbished cathedral of Santa Maria (Cattedrale di Santa Maria Immacolata di Alghero)  stands in Piazza del Duomo on Via Sant’Erasmo. Some of its oldest structures provide an outstanding example of the late Catalan-Gothic period.  This cathedral has been the bishop’s seat since 1503.

Door of the Cathedral’s Bell Tower in Alghero Sardinia

This cathedral is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It has an elaborate apse and an octagonal bell tower with a pyramidal cuspid. Some of the construction has dramatically transformed the interior and the façade. The original facade was replaced in 1862. The changes include four neo-classical Doric Columns supporting a triangular pediment  and a new central staircase.

The bell-tower is behind the church. It was part of the first phase of late Gothic construction and was modeled after the Cathedral of Barcelona. It has an octagonal barrel and pointed arch openings. It is crowned with a slender pyramid-shaped spire with polychrome majolica that is commonly used in Catalonia.  The distinctive Gothic  bell tower can be visited during high season.

Campanile of Santa Maria Cathedral in Alghero Sardinia

In 1503 Pope Julius II  implemented a major overhaul of the dioceses of Sardinia. He was supported in his efforts by King Ferdinand II. The first part of the building was finished during the first half of the XVI century and Alghero’s noble families guaranteed the financing needed to complete the project.

alghero Sardinia

Ornate lions in the cathedral of Alghero

The Cathedral was consecrated in 1730; 400 years after its foundation.  It houses the neoclassical marble mausoleum of the Duke of Monferrato, brother of King Carlo Felice  of Savoy, who died in 1799. This  mausoleum was sculpted by Felice Festa in 1807.

The interior space has three naves, separated by pillars and columns.  There are six chapels adorned with interesting sacred art. The first chapel to the right is dedicated to the Blessed Sacrament and it has an imposing altar consecrated in 1824. The carved marble is decorated the center with a circular temple reminiscent of the Temple of Vesta in Rome.

The Virgin protects the sailors in Alghero Sardinia

The Baptism in Alghero’s Cathedral

The presbytery has five chapels which include the base of the bell tower. It is surrounded by a balustrade, made ​​of inlaid marble with a coral hue. On the sides of the stairway to the altar there are two marble lions that resemble their kindred spirits in the Cathedral of Cagliari.

The balustrated high altar has a group of sculptures depicting the Immaculate Conception accompanied by angels.

The main altar of the cathedral in Alghero Sardinia

There is an elegant pulpit . Behind the wooden choir, in the apse there are five Gothic radial chapels.

Cathedral of Alghero Sardinia

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides available @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Alghero’s Museum of Sacred Art is Full of Treasures

Alghero‘s origins date back to the 10th century when the Genoese, with the help of Pisans, repelled the Arabs. Then they obtained land grants from the Judges (giudicati) of Logudoro that governed Sardinia during the Middle Ages.

The first capital city for the Giudicato of Logudoro was ancient Torres (now Porto Torres), but it was exposed to Arab attacks. Eventually, the seat of the judgeship was transferred to Ardara and finally to Sassari.

By the tenth century, the map on the right shows that the island was divided into four provinces or giudicati during the High Middle Ages Logudoro in the northwest section was the largest; Gallura to the east; Arborea to the south and Cagliari to the southeast. Later Logudoro and Arborea were combined into one province at the start of the eleventh century.

The Giudicato of Logudoro  was also known as the Giudicato of Torres, after Porto Torres. This area covered the northwest portion of Sardinia from the tenth through the thirteenth century. This is where Alghero is located.

Alghero was built around a fortified port, founded around 1102 by the Genoese Doria family. The Doria ruled it for centuries, apart from a brief period under the rule of Pisa (1283–1284). The Doria had fiefs in Sardinia from the 12th century to the 15th century. They also had fiefdoms in Dolceacqua, Oneglia and Portofino, in the Riviera to the west of Genoa.

In 1353 it was captured by the Aragonese under Bernardo de Cabrera. The Algherese revolted against the garrison’s commanding officer and killed him.  The Spanish responded by sending 12,000 men and 100 galleys to suppress the revolt.  A treaty was signed and the original Sardinian inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes and move to the town of Villanova about 25 killometers away.

The port became the main route between Catolonia and Sardinia and the town of Alghero was inhabited by Catalan colonists creating a distinctive Catonian settlement. The Spanish dominated the city for 360 years. Today, this region of Italy, enclosed with fortress walls is referred to as Little Barcelona. In 1720, control of Alghero passed to the House of Savoy.

To appreciate the sacred history of this charming town, visit the Museo Diocesano d’Arte Sacra. It is located in the historical center of the city of Alghero in the Rosary Church (Chiesa Del Rosario). The former church was enlarged between the 14th and 15th century when the upper floor was added to the structure.

The edifice became a church in the second half of the 17trh century. It was used as a place of worship until the first post-war period and ultimately became a museum in 2000. It is next to the Cathedral dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The treasures of the diocese of Alghero-Bosa are preserved in this Diocesan Museum of Sacred Art.

The Museum is in the former Church of Rosario on Piazza Duomo. The building was originally the Oratorio del Rosario; it belonged to the confraternity that founded the church of San Francesco in 1568. The small museum is packed with precious sacred art, artifacts and liturgical treasures.

The museum collection is divided into six sections: silver,  paintings, wooden sculptures, wood carving, stone and bronze. You will find an early 16th century “Our Lady of Sailors” from the Cathedral of the Virgin next door. It is attributed to a Catalan workshop. The museum opened on June 30, 2002 and preserves the Cathedral’s liturgical art, as well as sacred art from other churches in the diocese of Alghero-Bosa.

Our Lady of the Sailors

There is a beautiful “Eucharistic Throne” from 1720 from the Cathedral of the Virgin Mary. It is embossed and engraved from the workshop of Giovanni Andrea Lay from Cagliari.

Eucharistic Throne

There is a 17th century marble statue of  “Our Lady of Mercy” from the Church of Saint Michael that was created by a Ligurian workshop.

I loved the 19th century wooden carving of  “Baby Jesus” (Bambinello) from the Church of Saint Michael. It was adorned with coral and attributed to a Sicilian workshop.

Bambinello

The 17th century “Assumption of the Virgin” is  from a Sardinian workshop.

Assumption of the Virgin

There are precious sacred treasures from Alghero’s historical churches.

St. Lucy

Holy Family

In the Silver section there are beautiful objects created by silversmiths.  There is an impressive Catalan reliquary of the True Cross created by an unknown silversmith from Alghero in 1500.

The 17th century, Reliquary of a Holy Innocent Martyr is embossed in chiseled silver from a Sardinian workshop. It was originally in the Cathedral of the Virgin Mary.

Reliquary

Ornate Crucifix in Alghero Sardinia

This beautiful 17th century jeweled Monstrance (Ostensorio) was made by a silversmith from Trapani in 1679.

In the “Wooden Sculptures” Area of the Museum, there are many saints and representations of the Virgin. The golden statue represents the “Madonna dei Naviganti” by an unknown Catalan artist from the 15th century.

Madonna dei Naviganti

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Some of the polychrome wooden carvings from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth centuries include a gigantic San Michele Arcangelo (St.Michael the Archangel) from the end of the 17th century. It was formerly displayed in the church dedicated to St. Michael a few blocks away. The 18th century “Saint Joseph with the Child” from the church of Our Lady of Carmelo  is a polychrome wooden carving from a Neapolitan workshop.

There is a lovely 18th century oil on canvas Italian painting of “The Holy Family with the Saints Joachim and Anna.”

There are also a series of mid-17th century paintings by Genoese painters of scenes from the lives of Jesus and the Virgin. The 17th century brutal Ligurian School representation of the  “Scourging of Christ”  painting below is from the Church of Our Lady of Mercy.

Scourging of Christ

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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The Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence is the “National Pantheon”

A monument to the florentines fallen during th...

A monument to the florentines fallen during the WW1. God the Father, by Bandinelli. Santa Croce cloister, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Crucifixion, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence...

Crucifixion, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pulpit, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy.

Pulpit, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Monument à la mémoire de Donatello,...

Français : Monument à la mémoire de Donatello, Basilique Santa Croce de Florence, Italie. 1895. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Exterior of the Basilica of Santa Cro...

English: Exterior of the Basilica of Santa Croce (Florence). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Santa Croce is the church of the Franciscans and was built in the Italian gothic style.  It was completed in 1442.

Français : La porte principale de la basilique...

Français : La porte principale de la basilique de la Sainte-Croix (Santa Croce) à Florence, Italie. English: The main gate of Basilica Santa Croce in Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Santa Croce

Santa Croce (Photo credit: Dorina Bernard)

The Neo-Gothic façade was re-clad in 1863 in pink, green and white Tuscan marble. It is located in the Piazza di Santa Croce.

Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy

Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (Photo credit: SpirosK)

Florence Italy

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is dubbed the “National Pantheon” because it has tombs or centotaphs of the greatest Italians.  A centotaph is a funerary monument without the remains of the deceased.

The six-pointed star in the central tympanum is Medieval and these rays  symbolize St. Bernadino. In Christian art, there are many saints associated with this star: St. Bruno bears a star on his breast; Saint Dominic, Saint Humbert and Saint Peter of Alcantara have this star on their head or forehead.

Florence Italy

The beautiful bell tower was rebuilt in 1842 by Gaetano Baccani because it was destroyed by a bolt of lightning in 1512.

Michelangelo's tomb

Michelangelo’s tomb (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Florence Italy

Tondo of Saint Matthew the Evangelist on the d...

Tondo of Saint Matthew the Evangelist on the dome of Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (It has been suggested that it was the work of Donatello.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of Saint John the Evangelist on the dome...

Tondo of Saint John the Evangelist on the dome of Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy (It has been suggested that it was the work of Donatello.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

South of the church, visit the secret garden and cloisters. The Pazzi Chapel was designed by Brunelleschi in 1429. It is set in front of the neo-Gothic bell-tower. The chapel  is adorned by  terracotta tondi of the apostles by Luca della Robbia and by roundels of the Evangelists by Donatello.

The loggia was built and decorated in grey sandstone and decorated with terracotta.

inside view of the Dome hidden in the portico ...

inside view of the Dome hidden in the portico of Cappella dei Pazzi, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in th...

Tondo of an apostle by Luca della Robbia in the Pazzi Chapel, Basilica of Santa Croce, Florence, Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Main Chapel was commissioned by Jacopo degli Alberti. The polyptych on the altar was redone in the 19th century and portrays the Virgin, Saints and Fathers of the Church crowned by a large crucifix by “Maestro de Figline” who worked in Giotto’s workshop. There is a beautiful Polyptych by Giotto and his pupils in the Baroncelli Chapel.

FLorence Italy

The Florentine Pantheon has tombs and monuments to legendary citizens. Many marble tombstones cover the floor of Santa Croce.

Renaissance tombs exalted the dead person’s achievements on earth. Most of the monuments is Santa Croce have designated allegorical figures to depict the earthly accomplishments of the deceased. The wall of the right nave contains the “Monument to Michelangelo” by Vasari (1570).

Michelangelo Buonarroti

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo returned to Florence between in 1499–1501, after after the fall Girolamo Savonarola who was executed in 1498. Michelangelo was asked to complete a colossal statue portraying David that was started 40 years earlier by Agostino di Duccio.

David

David (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Statue of David  would occupy a prominent spot  in the Piazza della Signoria, in front of the Palazzo Vecchio. Today the statue outside the Palazzo Vecchio is a replica. The real David is in the Academia in Florence.

Michelangelo-Buonarroti-David-Replica-Florence

Michelangelo-Buonarroti-David-Replica-Florence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This famous sculpture was made from a marble block from the quarries at Carrara.

In 1505, Michelangelo was invited back to Rome by Pope Julius II to build the Pope’s tomb. He worked on the tomb for 40 years.

The tomb of Pope Julius II by Michelangelo and...

The tomb of Pope Julius II by Michelangelo and its statue of Moise in the basilica San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The tomb is located in the Church of S. Pietro in Vincoli in Rome and  Michelangelo’s statue of Moses is the central feature.

Statue of Moses by Michelangelo, church San Pi...

Statue of Moses by Michelangelo, church San Pietro in Vincoli; Rome, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Michelangelo died, Vasari erected his tomb in Santa Croce. The sarcophagus is surrounded by allegorical figures of “Painting” by Battista Lorenzi, “Sculpture” by Valerio Cioli and “Architecture” by Giovanni dell’Opera.  The bust of Michelangelo was carved by Lorenzi. The beautiful frescoes that flank the monument were done by Domenico Ghirlandaio.

On November 17, 2015, they launched a  Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for the restoration of the Pazzi Chapel Loggia, one of the finest examples of Renaissance architecture, in the Santa Croce complex. make your contribution here: http://www.santacroceopera.it/en/Opera_Sponsor.aspx

cappella pazzi, santa croce, florence

The interior of Santa Croce, Florence

The interior of Santa Croce, Florence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides to Italy at www.vino-con-vista.com

Florence Italy

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My Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend in Genoa Italy

La Cattedrale di San Lorenzo a Genova in una f...

La Cattedrale di San Lorenzo a Genova in una foto d’epoca. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: San Lorenzo cathedral, Genova, Italy....

English: San Lorenzo cathedral, Genova, Italy. Italiano: Cattedrale di San Lorenzo, Genoa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Genoa

Genoa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Portofino’s small harbour on the Italian Riviera

Portofino’s small harbour on the Italian Riviera (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria, italy

Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria, italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Coat of arms of Italian region Liguri...

English: Coat of arms of Italian region Liguria Italiano: Stemma della regione italiana Liguria. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Genoa Cathedral.

Genoa is the beautiful capital city of Liguria. This coastal city is a great place for a Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend where you can sip plenty of Val Polcevara Rosso wine from www.andreabruzzonevini.it.

Here’s a video of my favorite sites in Genoa Italy: http://youtu.be/wujacerrsp8.

Map of Liguria.

Map of Liguria. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Genoa is located in northwestern Italy, on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Genoa is in the pristine Italian Riviera on the Gulf of Genoa located in the northernmost part of the Ligurian Sea on the Riviera di Levante. If you stay in Levanto, you can take the train to Genoa or move to towns in the Cinque Terre by boat.

Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria, Italia

Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You can easily visit the Cinque Terra and Portofino from Genoa. Don’t miss the charming town of Santa Margherita Ligure, about 35 km southeast of Genoa. I bought one of my favorite dresses in a shop there. You can stay at the splendid Grand Hotel Miramare where Vivian Leigh and Sir Lawrence Olivier stayed on their honeymoon in 1947. www.lhw.com/ghmiramare Sign up for cooking lessons with Chef Viviano Panzetta.

Portofino, a small Italian fishing village on ...

Portofino, a small Italian fishing village on the Italian Riviera (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Façade of St. Lawrence Cathedral.

Façade of St. Lawrence Cathedral. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I love the beautiful Romanesque Cathedral of San Lorenzo in Genoa Italy. The Cathedral is brimming wih magnificent works of art!

Interior of the Cathedral.

Interior of the Cathedral. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italiano: Navata laterale laterale esterna (us...

Italiano: Navata laterale laterale esterna (uscita in via S. Lorenzo) della Cattedrale di San Lorenzo a Genova. This image was moved from Image:IM000957.JPG. Move approved by: User:G.dallorto. File:Noack, Alfred (1833-1895) – n. 3070 – Genova – S. Lorenzo.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inside the cathedral admire the following:  ceiling frescoes by Luca CambiasoSt. Sebastian’s Vision by Barocci; an Episode from the life of St. Lawrence by Giovanni Andrea Ansaldo; another ceiling fresco of the Martyrdom of St Lawrence by Lazzaro Tavarone; and an Assumption of the Virgin  by Gaetano Previati. The church also contains sculptures including: a statue in the chapel of St. John by Domenico Gagini ; a Virgin and a St. John the Baptist by Andrea Sansovino. You can also admire the work of Matteo Civitali, Taddeo Carlone, and Giacomo and Guglielmo Della Porta. Genoa’s beautiful and distinctive black and whited striped domed Romanesque Duomo, the Cathedral of San Lorenzo,  is the seat of the Archbishop of Genoa.

Excavations under the pavement in the area in front of today’s façade have revealed Roman ruins and pre-Christian sarcophagi. Upon this ancient cemetery, a church was built that was devoted to the Twelve Apostles. It was then replaced by a new cathedral dedicated to St. Lawrence martyr (San Lorenzo) with money generated by the Genoese fleets in the Crusades.

This Piazza of San Lorenzo, ultimately became the heart of the city.

The cathedral was consecrated by Pope Gelasius II on October 8, 1118. I love the carved lions that grace the staircase by Carlo Rubatto. The central lunette depicts Jesus glorified between the evangelists and the martyrdom of St. Lawrence.

 

Various altars and chapels were erected between the 14th and 15th the century. The small loggia on the north-eastern tower of the façade was built in 1455; on the opposite side, the loggia built in Mannerist style, is from 1522.

In 1550 the Perugian architect Galeazzo Alessi was commissioned by the city magistrates to plan the reconstruction of the entire building. His ultimate intervention included the cupola, the covering of the nave and aisles, the pavement and the apse.

The construction of the cathedral ended in the 17th century. The dome and the medieval parts were restored between 1894-1900.

During World War II, the cathedral escaped damage when the city of Genoa was under siege during  Operation Grog. The British battleship,  HMS Malaya fired a  shell into the south-east corner of the nave. The relatively soft material failed to detonate the fuse and the shell is still there.

The Museum of the Treasury lies under the cathedral. It holds precious relics,  jewelry and silver. One of the most important relics is a Sacra Catino, a sacred basin brought by Guglielmo Embriaco in the 12th century, after the conquest of Cesarea. It is believed to be a sacred element used by Christ during the Last Supper. Guglielmo Embriaco (born in 1040), was a Genoese merchant and military leader who came to the assistance of the Crusader States in the aftermath of the First Crusade.

La Lanterna, the ancient lighthouse of Genoa

La Lanterna, the ancient lighthouse of Genoa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

View towards the lighthouse, Genoa Italiano: V...

View towards the lighthouse, Genoa Italiano: Vista del centro storico di Genova, verso la lanterna (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The area around the Cathedral of San Lorenzo is medieval, but the 12th century Duomo is Romanesque.

Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vasta...

Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vastato, Genova, Liguria, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some of the other important intersting churches in Genoa include: the Church of San Donato, the Church of Sant’Agostino, the Oratory of San Giacomo della Marina, the Church of Santo Stefano, San Torpete and the Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vastato.

Genoa is Italy’s most important commercial port. The “La Lanterna” lighthouse is a testimant to Genoa’s medieval sea-faring glory. The Old Harbour (Porto Antico) has been transformed into a mall by architect Renzo Piano. Genoa has the largest aquarium in Europe located in Porto Antico www.portoantico.it. Porto Antico also has a Childrens’ Museum with a lovely waterfront Promenade and shops. The restaurants offer outstanding “Vino con Vista” opportunities.

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Ecce Homo, Caravaggio, 1605

Ecce Homo, Caravaggio, 1605 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Via Garibaldi, Genoa’s most beautiful street, the 16th century Palazzo Bianco houses an outstanding collection of Ligurian art from 1400 to 1700 including works by Luca Cambiaso, Domenico Piola, Bernardo Strozzi and Giovanni Benedetto.  At the Palazzo Bianco, one of my favorite Caravaggio’s paintings “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man of Sorrows) can be viewed. You can also admire frescoes by de Ferrari and Domenico Piola.

Dipinto del pittore Domenico Piola raffigurant...

Dipinto del pittore Domenico Piola raffigurante l'”Allegoria della carità” conservato presso il palazzo Bianco di Genova (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The “Rolli” palaces were patrician residences built by the wealthiest and most powerful aristocratic families of the Republic of Genoa.

Dipinto "Giuseppe venduto ai fratelli&quo...

Dipinto “Giuseppe venduto ai fratelli” del pittore Giovanni Andrea De Ferrari (XVII secolo) presso Palazzo Bianco di Genova (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These dwellings were built at the height of Genoa’s seafaring prowess.  Palaces are generally three to four stories high and feature spectacular staircases, courtyards, and loggias overlooking gardens.  The owners of these palazzi were obligated to host official visits of State as decreed by the Senate in 1576.  These formal visits contributed to the dissemination of their architectural model, which attracted famous artists like Peter Paul Rubens.

Italiano: Genova, Via Garibaldi; Palazzo Podes...
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If you follow my posts, you know I depend on the Hop-on Hop-off Bus for my weekend excursions. Take the Genoa tour bus and you can marvel at the 16th and 17th century “New Streets” (Strada Nuova). Genoa’s historically impressive “urban development projects that represent plans by the public authority to parcel out a system of lodging based upon legislation.” (UNESCO).

The magnificent structures can be found in the historic city center. These elaborate Renaissance and Baroque palaces are called the Palazzi dei Rolli. This is where the note prominent families lived. These residences are located on Via Balbi and Via Garibaldi and are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Visit the Palazzo Rosso museum, Palazzo Bianco, Palazzo Grimaldi and Palazzo Reale. Palazzo Bianco and Palazzo Rosso are also known as Musei di Strada Nuova. Palazzo Rosso was built for Ridolfo and Giovanni Francesco Brignole Sale in 1671.  Admire Gregorio de’Ferrari’s “Allegoria dell’Estate” in the Spring Room of Palazzo Rosso. The Gallery of Palazzo Rosso has a fine collection of furniture, ceramics and Chinese pottery. The Museum of Oriental Art houses treasures brought to Genoa by her famous navigators.

Gregorio de’ Ferrari, Allegoria dell'Estate, 1...

Gregorio de’ Ferrari, Allegoria dell’Estate, 1686–7, Palazzo Rosso, Genoa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Genova, Via Garibaldi Palazzo Rosso - cortile

Genova, Via Garibaldi Palazzo Rosso – cortile (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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The main features of central Genoa include Piazza De Ferrari with a monumental fountain. You can also find the Opera and the Palace of the Doges in this area.

This was the childhood home of Christopher Columbus whose memory permeates the town. There is also a house where Christopher Columbus is said to have been born. I love the Cristoforo Colombo Statue that was erected between 1846-1862. At the base of the statue, the four smaller statues depict Stength, Pity, Prudence and the Art of Navigation.

Deutsch: Piazza de Ferrari in Genua

Deutsch: Piazza de Ferrari in Genua (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Genoa. Monument to Christopher Columbus".

Genoa. Monument to Christopher Columbus”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Other city landmarks worth cisiting include Palazzo del Principe, and the monumental cemetery of Staglieno, renowned for its magnificent statues like the Allegory of Faith by Santo Varni.

Allegory of Faith (or Religion), by Santo Varn...

Allegory of Faith (or Religion), by Santo Varni, in the Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy. Italiano: La statua della Fede (o della Religione), di Santo Varni, nel Cimitero monumentale di Staglieno di Genova. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cimitero monumentale di Staglieno, Genova

Cimitero monumentale di Staglieno, Genova (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Edoardo Chiossone Museum of Oriental Art has one of the largest collections of Oriental art in Europe.

Saint George's cross (a red cross on a white b...

Saint George’s cross (a red cross on a white background), used as the Flag of England, the Italian city of Genoa and various other places. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Stay at the Locanda di Palazzo Cicala in Piazza San Lorenzo info@palazzocicala.it and dine at La Bitta nella Pergola on Via Casaregis for a feast in Genoa.

Genoa and the entire region of Liguria is a haven for foodies! It’s the focaccia and pesto capital of the world so enjoy the cuisine.

Here’s a pesto video for you to make some Pesto alla Genovese: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvCHwnZ–fY

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Happy Birthday Chicago!

White City of the World's Columbian Exposition...
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Al Capone. Mugshot information from Science an...

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The University of Chicago Logo

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English: Source: http://www.chicagob2b.net/lin...

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Happy Birthday Chicago! Uncork your favorite bottle of wine or champagne and toast to Chicago’s 178th birthday was held on March 4, 2015. Crank up your iPhone as you listen to Frank Sinatra sing “My Kind of Town“; originally part of the musical score for Robin and the 7 Hoods, a 1964 musical film starring several members of the Rat Pack.

Cover of "Robin and the Seven Hoods"

Cover of Robin and the Seven Hoods

Chicago is famous for many things including gangsters like Al Capone and the city definitely has some offers that you can’t refuse:

Chicago is also famous for sports teams: Bears, Bulls, Hawks, Cubs and Sox. We have had pretty good record for start-ups: Kraft, Motorola, Baxter, Sara Lee and don’t forget Groupon just to name a few.

English: Chicago Cubs logo

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Chicago Bulls logo

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We have plenty of famous politicians including: 2 Mayor Daleys and President Barack Obama.

President Barack Obama discusses the bid for C...

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Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley

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Richard J. Daley, mayor of Chicago, c. 1971

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Chicago is home to a plethora of superlatives: our higher learning institutons are world-class with some of the best business schools in the world like University of Chicago and Northwestern. The city is brimming with world-class chefs and we have some of the best restaurants in the world like Charlie Trotters and Alinea.

Chicago is a city of neighborhoods with distinctive architecture and ethnic roots.

Map of Chicago's community areas, grouped by c...

Map of Chicago’s community areas, grouped by color by “side” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

But one or our most endearing and enduring blessings is our world-class architecture! Generally, to celebrate Chicago’s birthday, some of her architectural shining stars will turn blue including:

the Willis Tower, the Trump Tower, the Merchandise Mart and the Prudential Building.

Deutsch: Chicago am Ufer des Lake Michigan Eng...

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Chicago‘s Columbian Exposition in the 1890’s spawned a flourishing legacy of global architectural pre-eminence and outstanding architecture in Chicago. Daniel Burnham’s passion for Beaux Arts priniciples of design generated a flurry of world-class structures. Chicago architects and structural engineers are still staking claims to global architectural marvels.

Much of new classical research was conducted a...

Much of new classical research was conducted at the University of Chicago. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chicago World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition, 1893 (Photo credit: Smithsonian Institution)

Bill Baker is a structural engineer who works at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill‘s (SMO) Chicago office in the landmark, 17 story Sante Fe Building. He can be credited with more supertall buildings of over 1000 feet than any other structural engineer in the world including the Trump Tower. The “Burl Khalifa” in Dubai is world’s tallest building at 160 stories. It is almost twice as tall as the building formerly known as the Sears Tower in Chicago. Bill was instrumental in designing The Burl with architect Adrian Smith at SMO.

Two of my favorite vintage buildings include the majestic Wrigley Building and the Gothic Revival Tribune building located at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River.

The Gothic Revival Tribune Tower in Chicago

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The distinctive clock tower of the Wrigley Building reminds me of Big Ben in London. There are 250,000 glistening glazed terra cotta tiles covering the classical structure that was completed in 1924 by Graham, Anderson, Probst and White. Quite appropriate for the great “White City.” The beautiful neo-gothic Tribune Tower is across the street from the Wrigley building. The 26 foot Sculpture of Marilyn Monroe is next to the Tribune Tower.

Wrigley Building

chicago wrigley building

I love the juxtaposition of the classic architecture with the modern architecture of buildings like the sleek Trump Tower. There’s a great view of the Wrigley Clock from Trump’s 16th floor restaurant aptly named “Sixteen.” They have an outstanding Sunday Brunch so why not celebrate Chicago’s Birthday party there!

Chicago Architecture

Chicago is a mecca for world-class museums, restaurants and hotels with plenty of “Vino con Vista” opportunities. The Michelin Guide for Chicago was released in November 2011.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides and Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

Happy Birthday Chicago from www.vino-con-vista.com

Chicago River Walk

Chicago Restaurants

Chicago Park Hyatt

Meioi Pinot NoirChicago Water Tower

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Ten Spectacular Vino con Vista Opportunities in Nice France on the Cote d’Azur

Map showing the extent of the Côte d'Azur.

Map showing the extent of the Côte d’Azur. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The lighthouse of Nice, on the Mediterranean c...

The lighthouse of Nice, on the Mediterranean coast (French Riviera). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A view along the "Promenade des Anglais&q...

A view along the “Promenade des Anglais” in Nice at night. Picture taken from the hotel Suisse. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the 14th century, Avignon became the religious capital of the western hemisphere. Literature and art prospered throughout the French region of Provence.

Français : Côte est de la Côte d'Azur, France

Français : Côte est de la Côte d’Azur, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1793, Nice was annexed to France and Napoleon began his Italian campaign from Nice in 1796. Between 1814 and 1860, Nice came under the House of Savoy until a popular referendum in 1860 made it a part of France forever. Use Nice as your hub to visit Monaco and Menton to the north and Cannes and Antibes to the south.

The Nice seafront on a windy day, viewed from ...

The Nice seafront on a windy day, viewed from the “Colline du Château” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carte Localisation Region France Provence-Alpe...

Carte Localisation Region France Provence-Alpe-Cote-d’Azur (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nice is located in the legendary region of the French Riviera known as the Cote d’Azur. This evocative term was coined over a century ago by the poet Stephen Liegeard. Nice is the capital of the Cote d’Azur and is packed with spectacular Vino Con Vista  things to do around the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels).

Vino con VIsta Nice France

Vino con Vista France

Vino con Vista Nice France

1. Stroll along the palm trees on the Promenade des Anglais (Walk of the English) that stretches along the beach of the Bay of Angels. Watch the sunbathers that opt to sit on the rocky beach rather than rent a comfy lounge chair. Take some photos of the charming locals along the path. Cross the street and stop at one of the casinos on the main drag.

Vino con Vista Nice FranceVino con Vista Nice

Vino con Vista Nice FranceVino con Vista Nice France

2.  Pay a tribute to Miles Davis at the entrance of the glorious Art Nouveau Negresco Hotel. Stop in for lunch or a glass of wine. Better yet, consider staying at this swanky establishment.

Vino con Vista Nice

Vino con Vista Nice France

Vino con Vista Nice FranceVino con Vista Nice France

Nice FranceVIno con Vista Nice France

3. Spend the day lounging on one of the lavish beach chairs while gazing at the magnificent vistas with a Nicoise flavored picnic lunch that you picked up from one of the local shops or the market in Old Nice. Try some La Socca that is made with chickpeas, olive oil and flour and is a local specialty. Buy some confectionery treats for your picnic at Confiserie Florian near the Old Harbor called Port Lympia. You can gaze at the antiques in Rue Segurane around the corner from Florian. It won’t be a “Vino con Vista” at the beach without a bottle of local wine!

Sweet Shop in NIce France

Vino con Vista Nice FranceVino con Vista Nice

Vino con Vista on the Beach in NiceVino con VIsta on the Beach in NIce France

VIno con Vista on the Beach in Nice

Vino con Vista Nice

Famous Sweet Shop in Nice called the Florian

4. Catch the “Little Train” on the Promenade or take the elevator to the Castle Hill which offers a breathtaking Vino con Vista “beaux panoramas du monde” view of Nice from this 300 foot hilltop park. The Castle (Le Chateau) was the Acropolis of the Greeks of Marseilles, a camp for the Romans and a citadel for the Counts of Provence and the Kings of Aragon in the Middle Ages.

Le Chateau  is named after a 12th-century château that was razed by Louis XIV in 1706 and never rebuilt. The remaining 16th century tower is the Musée Naval. The cemetery where Garibaldi is buried covers the northwest of the park.

Witness the magnificent waterfall and admire the lovely monuments. Have a glass of wine, cafe creme or a Magnum ice cream treat at the cafe on the top of the hill.

VIno con VIsta Nice France

Vino con Vista Nice FranceVIno con Vista Nice France

VIno con Vista Nice France

VIno con Vista NIce

5. Go to Old Nice (Vieux Nice) nestled at the foot of Castle Hill. Visit the Cours Saleya where the Flower Market is held during the day to find fresh fish, produce, cheese and beautiful flowers. You can find a fabulous flower market on the western side of the street and a spectacular food market on the eastern side with pastries and candied fruit.

The interesting sites include:  the Cours Saleya (the open air market), the Baroque Chapelle de la Miséricorde from 1740, Chapelle de l’Annonciation (Sainte-Rita), Eglise Saint-Jacques that was built by the Jesuits in 1612, the Cathedral Sainte Réparate and the Palais Lascaris.

Fresh Zucchini FlowersVino con Vista Nice

VIno con Vista NIce France

VIno con VIsta Nice France

Old Nice is loaded with charming shops that sell everything from soup to nuts.

Nice Cathedral, dedicated to Saint Reparata, i...

Nice Cathedral, dedicated to Saint Reparata, in Nice, on the French Riviera (Alpes-Maritimes, France). Français : Cathédrale Sainte-Réparate de Nice (Alpes-Maritimes, France). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is home to the lovely Cathedral of Nice named after Saint Reparate that was designed in the 17th century by the architect Andre Guibera.

Old Nice France

VIno con Vista Nice

VIno con Vista Nice FranceVino con Vista Nice France

VIno con Vista Nice France

Cathedral of Nice France

Vino con Vista Nice France

Saint Reparate

When you finish touring the gorgeous Cathedral, have lunch and a bottle of Vin de Pays du Var at La Claire Fontaine under the red umbrellas directly in front of the church. Send my regards to the chef.

VIno con Vista Nice France

Nice France

6. Have dinner in Old Nice (Le Vieux Nice) and witness the evening transformation when the flower stalls become the lively venue for seafood restaurants, nightclubs  and cafes. Wander through the charming streets like the Rue de la Boucherie (Butcher’s Street) and the Rue de la Poissonnerie (Fish Street). After dinner stop at Fennochio for a vast array of Nice’s version of delightful gelato.

Vio con Vita Nice France

7. Visit the Place Messena and the Ciy Center on the Avenue de la Victoire, the main street of Nice. The street is also called Avenue Jean Medecin and was named after the former mayor of Nice. Shop or dine along the pedestrian precinct of rue Messena. I love that the statues of the seven seated Men on tall poles who represent the continents. They change colors at night and put on a colorful light show in the evening.

VIno con Vista Nice FranceVIno con VIsta Nice France

Nice France

Nice France

Visit the neo-Gothic Basilica of Notre-Dame with a facade that resembles the facade of the Parisian Cathedral with the same name and the famous rose window.

This area becomes the main stage for the annual Carnival Event http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dx9DmP-ZEKM and opens up to the Place Messena with lovely statues and fountains.

8. Take the bus to the elegant Cimiez Quarter and admire the former Belle Epoque Regina Hotel where Matisse lived which has been converted to apartments. Admire the work of Matisse in a 17th century villa that has been converted into a Matisse Museum and admire the Blue Nude and the Woman with Amphora. Mattise spent the winters in Nice until he died in Cimiez in 1954.

Tours the ruins that surround the museum. The Roman arena hosts the famous annual Jazz Festival. Take time to admire the statues of the legendary Jazz musicians in front of the Museum. There’s a little outdoor cafe in front of the Matisse Museum.

VIno con Vista Nice France

VIno con VIsta Nice

VIno con Vista Nice France

Walk over to the Monestery of Cimiez that was founded in the 9th century by the Benedictine monks surrounded by magnificent gardens. Visit the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and then stroll through the cemetary. The church has significant paintings by 15th century local artists the Brea brothers.

The Monastery of Cimiez includes a church, a cemetery and a convent. A few Franciscan friars still live there. The convent houses the Musee Franciscain which is decorated with 17th century frescoes. The 17th century chapel has beautiful gardens and nice views of  Nice.

The painter Henri Matisse is buried in the cemetery of the Monastère Notre Dame de Cimiez. His grave is signposted ‘sépulture Henri Matisse’ from the cemetery’s main entrance (next to the monastery church on av Bellanda). Raoul Dufy (1877 – 1953) is also buried here.

VIno con VIsta Nice France

Nice France

Nice France

VIno con Vista Nice France

9. Go to the Marc Chagall National Biblical Message Museum built in 1972 by architect A. Hermant. You will love the 17 canvases of the Biblical Message. One of my favorites is Noah and the Rainbow.

Vino con Vista Nice FranceChagall Museum in NIce France

10. Travel to the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Nicholas near the Boulevard Tzarewitch. It was built between 1903 and 1913 and is the largest church of this type outside of Russia. The exterior of the church has elaborate onion domes that resemble Moscow’s Church of St. Basil.

Vino con Vista Nice FranceNice France

Take time to tour the Cathedral.

I suggest that you buy a French Riviera Pass in Nice at the Tourist Office. You can purchase a 24, 48 or 72 hour pass that will entitle you to the Hop-on Hop-off Bus in Nice, free entry to some attractions and the “Little Train.” It also includes some attractions in Antibes, Eze and the  Oceanographic Museum in Monaco. You can also purchase a one day train pass that will allow you to ride for 24 hours so you can visit Menton, Cannes, Antibes, Eze and Monaco which are all relatively close to Nice. Bon Voyage—

Join me in Nice http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsPQvcVbFM0&feature=fvwrel

Dr. EveAnn Lovero is a travel junkie who writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

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Vino con Vista in Ferrara: A UNESCO Site in Emilia Romagna

Este Castle of Ferrara, Dawn Room, fresco port...

Este Castle of Ferrara, Dawn Room, fresco portraying the Time and the Fates (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Este Castle of Ferrara, Ducal Chapel, fresco o...

Este Castle of Ferrara, Ducal Chapel, fresco of the ceiling depicting the four Evangelists (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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see filename (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Este Castle of Ferrara, Italy
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Ferrara

Ferrara (Photo credit: ChrisYunker)

PALAZZO DEI DIAMANTI - FERRARA-

PALAZZO DEI DIAMANTI – FERRARA- (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Palazzo dei Diamanti, which houses the Pinacot...

Palazzo dei Diamanti, which houses the Pinacoteca Nazionale, Ferrara – Italy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Balloons of the Ferrara Balloons Festival

Balloons of the Ferrara Balloons Festival (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ferrara

Ferrara (Photo credit: ChrisYunker)

Equestrial bronze monument to Niccolò III of H...

Equestrial bronze monument to Niccolò III of House of Este of 15th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: coat of arms of Ercole I d'Este. Ital...

English: coat of arms of Ercole I d’Este. Italiano: stemma nobiliare di Ercole I d’Este. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1995, the entire town of Ferrara was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as an exceptional example of a Rennaisance town on the Po Delta  www.ferrarainfo.com. Ferrara is located around a ford over Italy’s longest river, the Po.  It is one of the region’s former fortified walled towns.

“Ferrara, which grew up around a ford over the River Po, became an intellectual and artistic centre that attracted the greatest minds of the Italian Renaissance in the 15th and 16th centuries. Here, Piero della Francesca, Jacopo Bellini and Andrea Mantegna decorated the palaces of the House of Este. The humanist concept of the ‘ideal city’ came to life here in the neighbourhoods built from 1492 onwards by Biagio Rossetti according to the new principles of perspective. The completion of this project marked the birth of modern town planning and influenced its subsequent development.”

UNESCO

Este Castle of Ferrara, Hall of Coats of Arms

Este Castle of Ferrara, Hall of Coats of Arms (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ferrara is in Emilia Romagna, about 31 miles northeast of Bologna. It has many places from the  14th and 15th  centuries from the House of Este.

Este Castle of Ferrara, Fresco in the Dawn Room

Este Castle of Ferrara, Fresco in the Dawn Room (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Corso Ercole I d'Este, Street in the Rennaissa...

Corso Ercole I d’Este, Street in the Rennaissance town center of Ferrara, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

The D’Este family took control of the town in the 13th century under Nicolo II and held power until 1598 when the family was forced to move to Modena.  The city became an intellectual and artistic center that attracted the greatest minds of the Italian Renaissance in the 15th and 16th centuries under the reign of the Este court. The city of the Renaissance and its Po Delta became an inscribed UNESCO site in 1995.

Leonello D'Este portrayed by Pisanello.

Leonello D’Este portrayed by Pisanello. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ferrara is the birthplace of Girolamo Savonarola, the Domenican Friar who ruled Florence from 1494 until his execution in 1498. He was the infamous perpetrator of the “Bonfire of the Vanities.”  Ferrara is also famous for hot air balloons–are these events somehow related?? Ferrara is also the birthplace of Cosme Tura (1430-1495).  He was the court painter and sculptor for his patrons Borso d’Este and his successor Ercole. Two of his masterpieces are housed in the National Art Gallery of Palazzo dei Diamanti. They depict scenes from the life of St. Maurelio.

The Este Castle was commissioned by Nicolo II and built by Bartolino da Novara in 1385 to defend the d’Este family against popular revolts and is an outstanding example of Italian military architecture. The superb House of Este’s ducal residences were decorated by immortal masters like Piero della Francesca, Jacopo Bellini and Andrea Mantegna.  The towers and moats of the medival Castello Estense were founded in 1385.

Este Castle of Ferrara, Gothic Room

Este Castle of Ferrara, Gothic Room (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Romanesque-Gothic Ferrara Cathedral was built around 1135 and was decorated with marble patterns in the late 13th century. It has impressive reliefs over the tympanum of the “Last Judgement” on the façade.  The new cathedral museum is housed inside the church of San Romano and contains sacred relics, paintings and sculptures. Visit the church of San Georgio, the city’s patron saint. Built in the 10th century, it was the city’s cathedral until the 12th century. The Church of Sant’Antonio in Polesine has beautiful frescoes from the 13th and 14th centuries.

Ferrara

Ferrara (Photo credit: ChrisYunker)

The d’Este summer retreat, Palazzo Schifanoia was commissioned by Alberto V d’Este in 1385. It  is decorated with beautiful murals by Ferrara’s best 15th century painter, Cosimo Tura. The “Hall of Months” is frescoed by Francesco del Cossa, Ercole de Roberti and Cosme Tura. It is the home of the Civic Museum of Ancient Art which displays bronze , ceramics and frescoes.

Este Castle of Ferrara, The Hall of the Games

Este Castle of Ferrara, The Hall of the Games (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the Piazza Ariostea, on the last Sunday of May you can attend the dramatic Palio de San Giorgio, a bareback horse- riding extravaganza between the 8 town districts that was made official in 1279 to win the precious drape of St. George, the patron saint of Ferrara www.paliodiferrara.it.

Este Castle of Ferrara, Ceiling of the Governm...

Este Castle of Ferrara, Ceiling of the Government Hall (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you miss the big event, have a “Vino con Vista” and order a glass of Albana di Romagna, Sangiovese di Romagna, Trebbiano di Romagna or Lambrusco di Sorbara at a local cafe. Visit the Osteria Al Brindisi, the world’s oldest wine bar on via Adelardi.  While you sip your wine, think about how Nicolo Este III had his wife and her lover brutally murdered.  This may prevent you from running off with some Italian hottie!

The cuisine recalls the courts of d’Este and is famous for salama sauce and cappelletti stuffed with turkey or pumpkin. I love the cappellacci di zucca stuffed with butternut squash and Parmigiano Reggiano flavored with nutmeg and covered with a delightful buttery sage sauce. Dine at La Providenza or Il Don Giovanni, both restaurants are located on Ercole d’Este.  Get your Buon Ricordo collector plate at Trattoria e Locanda La Chiocciola in Quartiere di Portomaggiore @ Via Runco, 94/F (www.locandalachiocciola.it).  The collector plate depicts the signature “Snail Timbale” served with mashed potatoes, shallots and herbs served in this charming bed and breakfast.

The Palazzo dei Diamanti has many special exhibits. When I  was there, I saw works by French 18th century still-life master Jean-Baptiste Simeon Chardin on loan from major international museums. To learn more about Italy read www.vino-con-vista.com Travel Guides.

 

Ferrara

Ferrara (Photo credit: ChrisYunker)

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Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise: Florence Art History 101

Old Testament- Joseph in Egypt from the "...

Old Testament- Joseph in Egypt from the “Gates of Paradise”, Lorenzo Ghiberti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Baptistery, Florence, probably 11th cent. Roma...

Baptistery, Florence, probably 11th cent. Romanesque (6) (Photo credit: Prof. Mortel)

English: The Gates of Paradise by Lorenzo Ghib...

English: The Gates of Paradise by Lorenzo Ghiberti at Florence. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gilt-bronze doors of the Baptistry at Florence...

Gilt-bronze doors of the Baptistry at Florence (Lorenzo Ghiberti, 1401-22) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bust of Lorenzo Ghiberti in the Gates of Paradise

Bust of Lorenzo Ghiberti in the Gates of Paradise (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Baptistry of Firenze, Italy Deutsch: ...

English: Baptistry of Firenze, Italy Deutsch: Das Baptisterium San Giovanni in Florenz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gates of Paradise, Baptistery, Florence. The d...

Gates of Paradise, Baptistery, Florence. The doors in situ are reproductions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Adam and Eve by Ghiberti (Panel 1 of the Gates...

Adam and Eve by Ghiberti (Panel 1 of the Gates of Paradise, see below). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Baptistry with Ghiberti’s Bronze Doors, “The Gate of Paradise” was sculpted by Ghiberti (1378-1455) between the years 1425 and 1452.  The 10 panels depict biblical scenes from the Old Testament .Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise at the Baptistry in Florence ItalyThey  include: the Original Sin of Adam and Eve, the Story of Noah and the Story of Moses.Here are some “Art History Tidbits”:
 1. The Baptistry is one of the city’s oldest buildings, built in the 6thcentury.2. The doors on the Baptistry are not the original doors. Ghiberti’s original doors are preserved in the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo.3. Inside the Duomo Museum you can admire the original scenes from the “Last Judgment” by Zuccari and Vasari.

4. Many visitors think that the original doors are on the Baptistry-don’t be fooled! Go see the original doors while you are in Florence at the Museum!

5. In the center of the door, Ghiberti cast a self portrait. His prominent facial features and wrinkled brow are displayed among the other faces.

Ghiberti's Self Portrait on the Gates of Paradise in Florence

Ghiberti

6. The original panels were damaged during the flood of 1966.

7. The panels were restored after the flood and moved to the Museo of the Cathedral.

8. Historically, the Baptistry of the church was separated from the actual church building because people were not allowed to enter the church until they were baptized.

The panel below is a scene from “The Battle with the Philistines.”

In this scene, David slays Goliath and carries his head before a cheering crowd to Jerusalem.

Ghiberti's door of David and Goliath

Old Testament- Joseph in Egypt from the "...

Old Testament- Joseph in Egypt from the “Gates of Paradise”, Lorenzo Ghiberti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

A Bronze plaque (history of Joseph), from the ...

A Bronze plaque (history of Joseph), from the Gates of Paradise of the Florence Baptistery, by Lorenzo Ghiberti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guide Books to Italy and  Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

Gates of Paradise in Florence

Gates of Paradise in Florence

The Gates of Paradise (by Lorenzo Ghiberti) of...

The Gates of Paradise (by Lorenzo Ghiberti) of the Baptistery, Florence. Schema: 1. Adam and Eve 2. Cain and Abel 3. Noah 4. Abraham 5. Isaac with Esau and Jacob 6. Joseph 7. Moses 8. Joshua 9. David 10. Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To learn more about Italy read www.vino-con-vista.com Travel Guides. iBookstore

NYC - Metropolitan Museum of Art - Gates of Pa...

NYC – Metropolitan Museum of Art – Gates of Paradise – Jacob and Esau (Photo credit: wallyg)

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Filed under David and Goliath, ebooks, Florence, Florence Baptistry, Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise, Ghiberti's Gates of Paradise: Florence, IPad, Italian art, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, Last Judgment, Renaissance Art, The Gates of Paradise, Travel and Tourism, Tuscany, UNESCO, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites