Top Vino con Vista UNESCO Attractions in Turin Italy

Venaria Reale, Torino. Piazza dell'Annunziata

Venaria Reale, Torino. Piazza dell’Annunziata (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Torino, Mole Antonelliana, (Italy).

Torino, Mole Antonelliana, (Italy). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Coat of arms of Turin Italiano: Stemm...

English: Coat of arms of Turin Italiano: Stemma di Torino che si trova presso Palazzo Carignano, lato piazza Carlo Alberto (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Palazzo Carignano, Turin: back from P...

English: Palazzo Carignano, Turin: back from Piazza Carignano. Italiano: Palazzo Carignano a Torino: retro da Piazza Carignano. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: turin italy piazza castello

English: turin italy piazza castello (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italiano: Collage di varie foto di Torino

Italiano: Collage di varie foto di Torino (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Venaria Reale (Torino) - Reggia sabauda

Venaria Reale (Torino) – Reggia sabauda (Photo credit: giovanni_novara)

Turin‘s main attractions include important Baroque palaces and churches and world-class museums.

Turin is the European capital of Baroque including: Palazzo Carignano, Piazza San Carlo – the city’s meeting point and the San Lorenzo and San Filippo churches. Baroque also characterizes the Royal Residences, the Reggia di Venaria, the Castello di Rivoli.

The city also has elements of Art Nouveau style that embellishes the city’s elegant architectural districts.

Turin was the capital of Italy and has plenty of contemporary art and design.

English: Palazzo Carignano in Turin: main faça...

English: Palazzo Carignano in Turin: main façade, from Piazza Carlo Alberto. Italiano: Palazzo Carignano a Torino: facciata principale, da Piazza Carlo Alberto. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are 15 Savoy Residences that are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/823.

Fronte di Palazzo Carignano di Torino al tramo...

Fronte di Palazzo Carignano di Torino al tramonto. Leggero retouch per esaltare un croma e bordi da stampa anastatica. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

They represent an important cultural route for travelers. Five of the sites are in the city: Palazzo Reale, Palazzo Madama, Palazzo Carignano, Castello del Valentino and Villa della Regina. The others are outside the city boundaries: the Stupinigi Hunting Lodge, the castles of Rivoli – hosting the important Museum of Contemporary Art, Moncalieri, Aglià and the Reggia di Venaria. The residences were completed around the middle 18th Century and are also known as the “delightful crown” because they surround Turin like a ring.

  • Palazzo Madama in Piazza Castello was recently re-opened after a long refurbishment. It was home of the Queen, and is a mix of medieval and baroque rooms. There’s plenty of art religious art and scenes of life in Torino.
  • Tickets € 7,5
  • Palazzo Carignano, Via Accademia delle Scienze 5 (close to Piazza Castello).
  • Castello di Rivoli is located in the small town of Rivoli, east of Turin. It houses one of Europe’s most important Contemporary Art Museums. The Castle of Rivoli is a unfinished XVIII castle that stands on top of Rivoli hills. Corso Francia (France Road) is one of the world’s longest streets and was built because of the desire of the House of Savoy to connect Royal Palace in the center of Turin with Rivoli Castle. You can reach it by bus or taxi.
  • La Venaria Reale outside the town of Venaria, 10 kilometres north east of Turin. Restored to the baroque magnificence that inspired it when it was built in the mid 17th century for duke Carlo Emanuele II di Savoia, the Reggia of Venaria Reale was inaugurated in October 2007, after two centuries of abandon and decay, and eight years of intense restoration. In the first year since it opened to the public, Venaria Reale has welcomed approximately 1.000.000 visitors becoming one of the most popular spot in Italy. The enormous palace, which has a surface area of over 80,000 square metres, contains some of the most outstanding examples of European baroque architecture: the enchanting Salone di Diana, designed by Amedeo di Castellamonte, the solemnity of the Galleria Grande and the chapel of Sant’Uberto, and the immense complex of the Scuderie, designed by the 17th century genius, Filippo Juvarra. The Gardens now represent a close combination of ancient and modern. Venaria Reale, which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, is at the centre of the circuit of Royal Residences in Piedmont. To get there: Venaria Express” shuttle bus operated by GTT (freephone number: 800 019152 http://www.comune.torino.it/gtt Bus: routes 72, 11 (freephone number: 800 019152 – http://www.comune.torino.it/gtt) Train: Turin-Ceres line (freephone number: 800 019152 – http://www.comune.torino.it/gtt) Car: Torino Nord orbital road, Venaria or Savonera/Venaria exit. GTT bus ticket with return € 5.Entrance to the Venaria 15 €. (July 2012)
Front of palace Carignano, Turin (Italy) Franç...

Front of palace Carignano, Turin (Italy) Français : Façade de palais Carignano, Turin (Italie) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Torino, Italia

Torino, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Museo Nazionale del Cinema is a vertical structure located on 5 floors in in the magical  Mole Antonelliana building.

 The Mole Antonelliana was completed in 1888 as a synagogue.  The 167.5-meter tower is the highest work of masonry in Europe and it now contains one of the finest cinema museum of Europe. An elevator to the top is available with a ticket.

  • The National Cinema Museum opened in July 2000.  The 5-story exhibition includes themes: Archaeology of Cinema, the Video Camera, a collection of cinema posters, video installations (including a number of small rooms screening clips on themes such as Turin in the movies, love stories and experimental film) and The Great Temple (where you recline in comfortable red chairs and watch classic Italian films projected on giant screens overhead).
  • In a spectacular setting the museum offers artifacts from the collection of the Maria Adrianna Prolo Foundation including magic lanterns, optical illusions, photographs, drawings, models and other curious items. Amongst a fascinating array of other movie memorabilia, be sure to check out the original cape worn by Christopher Reeve in Superman. If you’re a certain age, that’s incredibly exciting!
  • The Egyptian Museum is the second most important museum in the world after the one in Cairo and houses an important collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts. It is located on Via Accademia delle Scienze, 6, 011 561 7776. outside Cairo. Founded in 1824 by King Carlo Felice after acquiring archeologist Drovetti’s collection, the museum contains 30,000 exhibits. It documents the history and civilization of Egypt from the paleolithic to the Coptic era through unique exhibits and collections of objects d’art, articles of daily use and funeral furnishings (including the Altar of Isis, the canvas painted by Gebelein, the intact tombs of Kha and Merit, and the exceptional cliff temple to Ellesjia). The museum is open every day except Mondays and Christmas (December 25th). Ticket are € 7,5.
Di ritorno dalla Galleria Sabauda

Di ritorno dalla Galleria Sabauda (Photo credit: kiki follettosa)

  • Museo dell’Automobile  st Corso Unità d’Italia 40. The collection houses over 170 vehicles, from 18th-century carriages to Formula 1 cars. cars.
  • The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist, Duomo di San Giovanni.  The Cathedral’s Chapel of the Shroud houses the controversial Shroud of Turin, which is stored in a vault below the Duomo.
  •  Quadrilatero Romano is filled with restaurants in the old Roman town, northwest of Piazza Castello.
  • Via Garibaldi is a pedestrian shopping zone between Piazza Castello and Piazza Statuto.
  • Galleria Subalpina is a pedestrian passage from Piazza Castello and Piazza Carlo Alberto. It is one of the most elegant places in the city.
  • Valentino Park, the biggest park in Turin central area. This park is situated along the Po river where you can find the Valentino Castle and the Medieval Village (Borgo Medievale).
  • Cathedral of Superga. On top of the hill near Turin, this cathedral was built to celebrate a victorious battle against French.  Take a trip to Superga by train from Sassi to see the magnificant Vino con Vista panoramic view of Turin. The Cathedral houses the tombs of the House of Savoy. In 1949, a plane carrying the entire Turin FC team crashed near the cathedral, killing one of the greatest football teams ever. At the crash site a plate memorializes the dead. The top of the hill offers the best view of Turin, with the magnificent Alps in the background. You can reach the top by car but also by a little chain-train.  Ask for the Trenino per Superga. Chain train with return € 6.Take the straicase inside the church to reach the top,€ 3.
  • Piedmont´s picturesque Langhe region is the home of Barolo and Barbaresco. Visit the Slow Food town of Bra, Alba (home of the white truffle festival).
  •  Barolo is a delightful wine hamlet, crowned with a castle.  Grinzane Cavour is another village with a stunning castle where the annual truffle auction takes place. .In Turin look for a tour of wine estates in Langhe. Head south to the vineyards of the Langhe. Visiting wine estates and the castle of Grinzane Cavour, which also houses a wine museum and regional wine shop with many top Barolos, Barbarescos and Grappas.
Piazza dell'Annunziata and the parish church, ...
Piazza dell’Annunziata and the parish church, Venaria Reale, Turin, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  • Armeria Reale (Royal Armoury), Piazza Castello, Turin, Italy, 011543889. 1. Turin’s Royal Armoury contains one of the Europes best arms exhibits, dating back to the 16th century. The collection was put together in 1833 by Sardinian King Charles Albert.
  • Porta Palazzo market is 5 minutes from Piazza Castello. It is one of the biggest and most diverse markets in Europe. The markets are open every weekday morning and all day Saturday. On Sunday Porta Palazzo houses a smaller flea market.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Enhanced by Zemanta
About these ads

1 Comment

Filed under Italy Travel Guides, Top UNESCO Attractions in Turin Italy

Climb the Spanish Steps in Rome for a Panoramic Vino con Vista

English: The Spanish Steps, Fontana della Barc...

English: The Spanish Steps, Fontana della Barcaccia, and Piazza di Spagna, in Rome, Italy Italiano: Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Spanish Steps, as seen from the F...

English: The Spanish Steps, as seen from the Fontana della Barcaccia in the Piazza di Spagna, at dusk on a summer’s eve. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Leave a comment

Filed under Italy, Rome, Spanish Steps in ROme, Via Condoti in Rome, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

My Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend in Amazing Albuquerque New Mexico

English: Dusk in Albuquerque, New Mexico, take...

English: Dusk in Albuquerque, New Mexico, taken from westside over toward the Sandia Mountains in the east. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Sandia Peak Tramway car ascending the mountain.

Image via Wikipedia

There are plenty of interesting things to do in Albuquerque New Mexico; a town loaded with profound natural beauty and  historic attractions. Here are some places to visit for a Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend in Albuquerque:

Sandia Mountains

1.  Historic Old  Town Albuquerque has been the heart of the city since its founding in 1706.  There are about 10 square blocks in Old Town where you can visit seven museums and more than 100 shops, galleries and restaurants www.albuquerqueoldtown.com. The Albuquerque Museum, the New Mexico Musuem of Natural History and Science and the Children’s Museum are located just east of Old Town.

The first Spanish settlers in the Old Town area organized their new town settlement in the traditional Spanish Colonial way with a central plaza anchored by a church.

Old Town Albuquerque

When the original church collapsed after an extremely rainy summer in 1792, they rebuilt and in 1793 the San Felipe de Neri Church was completed.

This charming church has walls that are five feet thick. It is the oldest church in Albuquerque with gleaming white towers that distinguish the Historic Old Town Albuquerque area from a distance.Albuquerque New Mexico

SanFelipe de Neri is the oldest Catholic church in Albuquerque. You will see happy couples posing for their wedding pictures in the Plaza’s gazebo across from the church after their wedding ceremony.

Old Town AlbuquerqueOld Town Albuquerque

2. The Sandia Peak Aerial Tram www.sandiapeak.com allows you to board one of the most popular tourist attractions in Central New Mexico. When you ride the Sandia Peak Aerial Tramway, you will witness deep canyons and lush forests. The Tram has transported more than 9 million passengers to the top  of Sandia Peak where you can admire the  2.7 mile sky-view.

The Sandia Mountains, as seen from the Sandia ...

The Sandia Mountains, as seen from the Sandia Peak Tramway, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The 15 minute flight to the 10,378 foot summit in the Cibola National Forest offers an amazing 11,000 square mile panoramic view of the Rio Grande Valley. Sandia Peak is a popular destination for skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing in the winter and mountain biking and hiking in the summer. Climb the La Luz trail with the Sandia Mountains as a gorgeous backdrop.  Witness the rugged and inaccessible rock escarpment of the west face of the Sandia Mountains. Each tramcar is capable of carrying 50 passengers or 10,000 pounds up the mountain at a maximum rate of 200 passengers per hour.  On the average, the tram makes 10,500 trips per year.

The Sandia Mountains, as seen from the Sandia ...

The Sandia Mountains, as seen from the Sandia Peak Tramway, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From the tram station at the top of Sandia Peak, passengers may hike along the forest trails in the Cibola National Forest observing the rock formations, natural vegetation and wildlife.  The tram serves Sandia Peak Ski Area, a prime spot for intermediate and beginner skiers from mid December through mid March.  During the summer, one of the chairlifts offers a lovely ride down the east side of the mountain through the towering trees.  Sandia Peak has more than 26 miles of trails for mountain bikers with easy access via the chairlift for riders and their bicycles.

After you ascend 4000 feet in 15 minutes, take time to  visit the High Finance Restaurant for a “Vino con Vista.” This  is especially exciting during Ballon Fiesta week from October 1-October 10. The restaurant offers daily specials and has a $36 Prime Rib weekend deal www.sandiapeakrestaurants.com.  If you don’t like heights, try or SanDiago’s Mexican Grill at the base of the Tram.

3. Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is the largest hot air balloon gathering in the world, held in early October. Founded in 1972 with 13 balloons, today it hosts 700 balloons in a variety of ascensions and activities in a 9-day event that attracts thousands. The new balloon museum is a major attraction. The Fiesta is one of the most photographed events in the world http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aaaZeKY2ac&feature=related.

You may also want to attend the Albuquerque Wine Festival. The event is always held over Memorial Day weekend at  Balloon Fiesta Park in Albuquerque www.abqwinefestival.com. There are wines from around the state with  food, music, arts and crafts and interesting educational programs.

Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque New Mexico

The Anderson-Abruzzo Albuqueque International Balloon Museum contains one of the world’s finest collections of balloons and artifacts with a spectacular view of the Sandia Mountains  overlooking Balloon Fiesta Park. The International Balloon Fiesta hosts wine festivals and other events year round.

4. The Flamenco Program at the University of New Mexico is the only program in the United States to offer a fully developed curriculum in Flamenco technique and choreography and a minor in Flamenco. Every year in June, the Program’s director, Eva Encinias-Sandoval, organizes the two-week Festival Flamenco Internacional, including master classes with guest artists from Spain and the U.S., a children’s component and a series of performances in venues around Albuquerque.

Madrid Spain

5. Gathering of Nations PowWow is one of the largest in the western hemisphere, attracting over 3,000 dancers, singers and drummers from 500 tribes across Canada, the U.S., Central America and South America. The event includes the Miss Indian World pageant and the Indian Traders’ Market. It is held on the last weekend in April at a University of New Mexico sports arena.

Albuquerque New Mexico

7. Tour the exciting wineries like Anaszani Fields surrounded by orchards that are watered by a spring-fed irrigations system that dates back over 1000 years to a time when the Anasazi People farmed the Placitas Valley. There is an annual Placitas Studio Tour for Mother’s Day weekend. Casa Rodena Winery and tasting room has an annual “Lavendar in the Valley Festival” in July and  “Festival di Musica Rondena” in August. Corrales Winery, Gruet WInery and St. Clair Winery and Bistro located in the heart of Historic Old Town on Rio Grande are all interesting destinations. www.stclairvineyards.com

Albuquerque New Mexico

The Vineyard Express offers delightfully tasty all inclusive day tours to the wineries and micro breweries of New Mexico on Saturdays April throu October www.thevineexpress.com

8. Albuquerque is loaded with vibrant shopping opportunities. There are charming shops in Old Town where you can buy Native American pottery and jewelry.

Albuquerque New Mexico

Albuquerque New Mexico

Albuquerque New Mexico

There are funky shops and chic nightspots with eclectic architecture with Route 66 signs on Knob Hill.

Albuquerque New Mexico

The Historic Knob Hill district is just east of the University. The Nob Hill Shopping center was designed by the noted architect Louis Hesselden and the design is a mixture of Territorial Revival with modern design elements. The National Register property is one of the best remaining examples of a 1940′s automobile-oriented shopping center in America with several neon signs and deco-inspired towers.

The Uptown area is home to a major business center as well as EXPO NM and two of Albuquerque’s major shopping malls. Coronado Center and ABQ Uptown. ABQ opened in 2006 and boasts national boutique chains with shopping, dining and lodging options. Dine at Marcello’s Chophouse with one of the most impressive wine list’s in Albuquerque; a Wine Spectator pick.

Best Restaurants for Wine in Albuquerque New Mexico

Albuquerque New Mexico Restaurant

Albuquerque New Mexico

9. Albuquerque is loaded with museums including:

The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology is one of the finest anthropology museums in the country with a special emphasis on the cultural heritage of the southwest located at the University of New Mexico.

The Albuquerque Biological Park is a unique environment comprising four facilities: the Aqaurium, Botanical garden, a 64 acre Rio Grande Zoo and Tingley Beach fishing lakes. The Rio Grande Zoo and the Albuquerque Biological Park offers visitors close encounters with more than 250 species of exotic and native animals.

The Rio Grande Botanic Garden celebrates the world of plants in the Mediterranean and desert pavillions located across the plaza from the Aquarium with 36 acres an a 10,000 square foot glass conservatory housing native and exotic plants with a butterfly pavillion.

The Wildlife West Nature Park is a 122 acre wildlife refuge and enhanced rescue wildlife zoo with over 20 species of native New Mexico animals.

The Museum of Archaeology and Biblical History with 3000 years of ancient near-Eastern artifacts relating to biblical history is on Constitution Ave.

The New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science has the world’s longest dinosaur, Seismosauraus on Mountain Road

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory designs, builds and operates the mworld’s most sophisticated and advanced telescopes 50 miles west of Socorro on HWY 60

The National Atomic Museum is the nation’s only Congressionally-chartered museum on nuclear science and history near Old Town. It was established in 1969 to chronical the fascinating story of the Atomic Age and is the only Smithsonian Affiliate in Albuquerque and the exhibits include the Manhattan Project, the Cold War, Radiation in the World Around You and Nuclear Energy.

The Indian Pueblo CUltural center is a gateway to the 19 pueblos of New Mexico and offers educational programming and exhibitions tracing the cultural heritage, history and contemporary expressions of the Peublo people of New Mexico at 2401 12th St. NW.

10. Jeep Tours allow you to explore ancestral Pueblo Ruins, Ghost Towns, extinct volcanoes, petroglphs ethched in rocks mesas, canyons, “Volcanic Necks” and other geological mountain and dessert locations while learning about the people, history, geology and culture of NM.

New Mexico Jeep Tours @ www.nmjeeptours.com. The tours range from 3 to 8 hours.

The Old Town District in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The Old Town District in Albuquerque, New Mexico. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you have time, don’t forget to jump on the New Mexico Rail Runner that travels to Santa Fe New Mexico. The station is located in the heart of the city’s transportation network at the Alvarado Transportation Center with north-south service through the metro area and Sante Fe www.nmrailrunner.com . Legendary Route 66 is Central Ave the city’s main street and trolley service connects downtown to Old Town.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

5 Comments

Filed under Albuquerque New Mexico, Albuquerque Wine Festival over Memorial Day Weekend, vino con vista

Travel to Tuscany’s Vino con Vista Wine Regions in Italy

The gallo nero seal of the Consorzio Chianti C...
Image via Wikipedia
Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in ...

Sangiovese vines of Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti sub-zone

Chianti sub-zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia

Montalcino, Toscana, Italia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico ...

A bottle of the Italian wine Chianti Classico made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes ...

English: A close-up view of sangiovese grapes to be made into Chianti at the Colle Lungo vineyard in Castellina in Chianti, Tuscany, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuscany is Italy’s quintessential wine region and the birthplace of three important red wines: Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. These wines are made from Sangiovese grapes but have distinctively different flavors in Tuscany’s diverse microclimates.

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of...

Vineyard growing in the Italian wine region of Tuscany, home of the Sangiovese-based Vino Nobile di Montepulciano wine. The photo also demonstrates the viticultural technique of clear (or bare) cultivation that leaves bare soil between the vines and rows with no cover crops. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chianti is produced in seven subzones in Tuscany. The Chianti Classico zone has DOCG status. The other six Chianti subzones are: Chianti Rufina, Colli Fiorentini, Colli Aretini, Colli Senesi, Colline Pisane and Chianti Montalbano. The “Chiantigiana” is the scenic road that twists and turns through the Chianti zones between Florence and Siena.

Brunello is Tuscany’s rarest and most expensive wine. It is produced in the walled medieval village of Montalcino, south of the Chianti Classico zone. The climate is warmer and the hills are steeper. The wine is aged longer and it must be aged in oak barrels.

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 I...

Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino 2003 Italian wine from Tuscany made from Sangiovese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vino Nobile di Montepulciano has been made in the town of Montepulciano since Etruscan times. This wine is made from prugnolo grapes a sangiovese clone and was granted DOCG status in 1980.

Here’s Wine Spectator’s detailed overview map of Tuscany . The map includes: Chianti, Bolgheri, Brunello di Montalcino, Maremma and the Montepulciano appellations.

Click here to view the map: http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Tuscanymap.pdf

On February 27th,2014 there was an annual award ceremony for the Best of Wine Tourism 2014 winners at Palazzo Capponi in Florence.

The winners were:

Castello di Gabbiano, San Felice winery, Enotria, Castello di Poppiano, Castello La Leccia, Tenuta di Poggio Casciano from Ruffino, Panzanello winery and Col d’Orcia.

To learn more about Italian food and wine read Vino con Vista Travel guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

iBookstore

Enhanced by Zemanta

8 Comments

Filed under Brunello di Montalcino, Chianti Classico, Florence, Italian Food, Italian Food and Wine, Italian Wine, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, Sangiovese, Sienna, Travel and Tourism, Tuscany, UNESCO, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

I Love Bernini’s Vino con Vista Rome: A Baroque Paradise Video

The Rape of Proserpina

The Rape of Proserpina (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Bernini's baldacchino, inside Saint P...

English: Bernini’s baldacchino, inside Saint Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Self-Portrait

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Self-Portrait (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Rape of Proserpina sculpture by Bernini in...

Image via Wikipedia

Magnificent works of art are housed in Rome and in the Vatican City state that became sovereign in 1929, ruled by the Pope.  The grand churches were built in the following order: Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque and Neo-Classical.

 

Most of the exquisite Baroque monuments and buildings were erected during the 16th and 17th centuries. Many of the most famous Baroque masterpieces are by Gian Lorenzo Bernini who lavished his artistic genius on the city of Rome.

 

Watch this Vino con Vista Video to see Bernini’s genius: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGX_gZMMa00

 

To learn more about Bernini’s Rome visit www.vino-con-vista.com

 

During my most recent trip to Rome, I went on a Bernini treasure hunt and these were some of my stops:

 

1. Bernini’s flamboyant baroque genius is readily apparent in his opulent bronze Baldacchino above the papal altar in St. Peter’s Basilica pictured below.

 

Bernini’s Baldachinno Pillar in Rome

Bernini’s Baldachinno at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome

Dove of the Holy Spirit (ca. 1660, alabaster, ...

Dove of the Holy Spirit (ca. 1660, alabaster, Throne of St. Peter, St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

2. Bernini began working on the splendid “Throne of Saint Peter in Glory” in 1656.  It occupies the space behind the Baldacchino and altar at St.Peter’s. The throne represents the authority of the Pontiff and is surrounded by statues of the founding fathers of the Church.

 

Bernini’s Throne in St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome

3. The Piazza Barberini has two Bernini fountains.

 

 

Bernini’s Triton Fountain

The Rape of Proserpina

The Rape of Proserpina (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4. Bernini’s “Rape of Proserpina” (1622) at the Borghese Gallery depicts Pluto, the powerful god of the underground, abducting Proserpina. The magnificent sculpture is featured in this post. Proserpina’s mother was Ceres, the goddess of harvest and fertility.  She cut a deal with Jupiter and obtained permission for her to daughter to spend half of the year in Hades and the other half on earth.  Every spring welcomes Proserpina back to earth with a luscious carpet of flowers.

English: A detail of the Rape of Proserpina sc...

English: A detail of the Rape of Proserpina sculpture by Bernini in the Galleria Borghese. Photo taken by myself on 01/20/07. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

5.Bernini’s “David” was completed in 1624.  The head of David is Bernini’s self portrait and it is also housed in the Borghese Gallery.

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides for Italy and Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Leave a comment

Filed under Bernini Baldacchino, ebooks, Italian Architecture, Italian art, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, Piazza Barberini, Rape of Proserpina, Roman Architecture, Rome, Rome History, Rome Italy, St. Peter in Glory, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

Best Places for a Caravaggio Treasure Hunt in Rome Italy

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - The Fortun...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – The Fortune Teller – WGA04082 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - Rest on Fl...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – Rest on Flight to Egypt – WGA04096 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - St John th...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – St John the Baptist – WGA04196 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John the Baptist (Youth with a Ram), c. 1602, ...

John the Baptist (Youth with a Ram), c. 1602, 129×94 cm, Doria Pamphilj Gallery, Rome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A portrait of the Italian painter Michelangelo...

A portrait of the Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Salome with the Head of John the Baptist by Ti...

Salome with the Head of John the Baptist by Titian, c 1515 (Galleria Doria Pamphilj, Rome) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - Salome wit...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – Salome with the Head of St John the Baptist – WGA04179 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On one of my visits to Rome, I had the opportunity to attend a Caravaggio Exhibit at the Scuderie del Quirinale for the 40oth aniversary of his death.

There are many Caravaggio paintings in Rome but they are not under one roof. So if you want a Caravaggio Teasure Hunt in Rome, you have to be willing to move around.

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - St. John t...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – St. John the Baptist – WGA04155 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John the Baptist, the cousin of Jesus, was the subject of at least eight paintings by the Italian Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610).

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - St John th...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – St John the Baptist – WGA04154 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many of his works are found in the palaces of Papal families. Visit Palazzo Doria-Pamphilj, Palazzo Barberini and Galleria Borghese to view his genius. Caravaggio’s masterpieces are displayed in many of the churches in Rome.

Amor Vincit Omnia (Love Conquers All), a depic...

Amor Vincit Omnia (Love Conquers All), a depiction of the god of love, Eros. By Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, circa 1601–1602 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s your Treasure Map to find Caravaggio in Rome:

1. The Galleria Borghese:

David with the head of Goliath,

Boy with a Basket of Fruit,

St Jerome in his Study,

Madonna and Child with St Anne,

 

St John the Baptist,

Self Portrait as Bacchus

2. Santa Maria del Popolo Church in the Cerasi Chapel:

The Conversion of St. Paul and the Martyrdom of St. Peter.

3. San Luigi dei Francesi in the Contarelli Chapel:

The Calling of Matthew,

St. Matthew and the Angel,

The Martyrdom of St Matthew.

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - The Martyr...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – The Martyrdom of St Matthew – WGA04121 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4. Church of St. Augustine to see the Madonna of the Pilgrims.

5. Palazzo Barberini – Judith and Holofernes, Narcissus and St John the Baptist.

6. Pinacoteca of the Vatican Museums – the Entombment of Christ.

7. Pinacoteca of the Capitoline Museums  – The Fortune Teller and St. John the Baptist.

8. Galleria at the Palazzo Doria Pamphilj – Penitent Magdalene

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - Magdalene ...

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio – Magdalene – WGA04094 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

and The Rest on the Flight into Egypt

9. National Gallery of Ancient Art in Palazzo Corsini in Trastevere.

10.  Barberini Palace

11. Capitoline Museums and Art Gallery

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com
John the Baptist (Youth with a Ram), c. 1602, ...

John the Baptist (Youth with a Ram), c. 1602, 129×94 cm, Doria Pamphilj Gallery, Rome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME – FEBRUARY 19: Masterpiece of Caravaggio ‘Judith Beheading Holofernes’ is shown at the Scuderie Del Quirinale during the ‘Caravaggio’ opening Exibithion on February 19, 2010 in Rome, Italy. The two exhibition floors of the Scuderie del Quirinale will host masterpieces of the Italian Maestro from worldwide museums in occasion of the 400th centenary of Caravaggio’s death. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME – FEBRUARY 19: Masterpiece of Caravaggio ‘The Cardsharps’ is shown at the Scuderie Del Quirinale during the ‘Caravaggio’ opening Exibithion on February 19, 2010 in Rome, Italy. The two exhibition floors of the Scuderie del Quirinale will host masterpieces of the Italian Maestro from worldwide museums in occasion of the 400th centenary of Caravaggio’s death. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME – FEBRUARY 19: Masterpiece of Caravaggio ‘Sacrifice of Issac’ is shown at the Scuderie Del Quirinale during the ‘Caravaggio’ opening Exibithion on February 19, 2010 in Rome, Italy. The two exhibition floors of the Scuderie del Quirinale will host masterpieces of the Italian Maestro from worldwide museums in occasion of the 400th centenary of Caravaggio’s death. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME – FEBRUARY 19: Masterpiece of Caravaggio ‘Supper At Emmaus’ is shown at the Scuderie Del Quirinale during the ‘Caravaggio’ opening Exibithion on February 19, 2010 in Rome, Italy. The two exhibition floors of the Scuderie del Quirinale will host masterpieces of the Italian Maestro from worldwide museums in occasion of the 400th centenary of Caravaggio’s death. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

ROME - FEBRUARY 19:  Masterpiece of Caravaggio...

ROME – FEBRUARY 19: Masterpiece of Caravaggio ‘Love Triumphant – Amor Vincit Omnia’ is shown at the Scuderie Del Quirinale during the ‘Caravaggio’ opening Exibithion on February 19, 2010 in Rome, Italy. The two exhibition floors of the Scuderie del Quirinale will host masterpieces of the Italian Maestro from worldwide museums in occasion of the 400th centenary of Caravaggio’s death. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

David with the head of Goliath.

David with the head of Goliath. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Caravaggio's art

Caravaggio’s art (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saint Jerome

Saint Jerome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Caravaggio

Caravaggio (Photo credit: Carmen Alonso Suarez)

The Conversion of Saint Paul

The Conversion of Saint Paul (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Crucifixion of St. Peter by Caravaggio. The ea...

Crucifixion of St. Peter by Caravaggio. The early Christians were persecuted by the Roman Empire (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Assumption of the Virgin Mary, in Santa Maria ...

Assumption of the Virgin Mary, in Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Go to Via del Corso and planned a stop at the

Enhanced by Zemanta

5 Comments

Filed under Best Places for a Caravaggio Treasure Hunt in Rome Italy, Italy Travel Guides

Amazing Art Exhibitions in Italy’s Finest Vino con Vista Cities

Italiano: La Deposizione di Cristo.

Italiano: La Deposizione di Cristo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lucas Cranach d. Ä. 092

Lucas Cranach d. Ä. 092 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lucas Cranach d. Ä. - Madonna met kind

Lucas Cranach d. Ä. – Madonna met kind (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lucas Cranach the Elder

Lucas Cranach the Elder (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lucas Cranach the Elder. Venus with Cupid Stea...
Image by alarcowa via Flickr

If you follow my posts, you read about the Food and Wine Festivals in Italy. Allow me to share some outstanding regional Art Museums that have temporary exhibits that you may want to attend in Italy’s UNESCO World Heritage Cities.

Check the Museum Websites for detailed information about Temporary Exhibitions.

In Rome:

The Borghese Gallery‘s has had temporary shows including a “Lucas Cranach” exhibit that featured the German Renaissance painter. There were actually two famous “Cranach” painters, Lucas Cranach the Elder and his son Lucas Cranach the Younger. Admire 45 works from major international museums including Cardinal Borghese‘s  prized “Venus and Cupid”  which is the only Borghese Gallery possession.

Scuderie del Quirinale‘s temporary shows have included”Painter’s of the Risorgimento’s War Scenes” and Caravaggio’s works from around the world.

 

In Florence:

Palazzo Strozzi‘s temporary exhibits have included: “Bronzino: Painter, and Poet of the Medici Court”.

Palazzo Pitti‘s exhibits have included “Vinum Nostrum: Art, Science and Wine in Civilization.”

The Bargello‘s “Giovanfrescesco Rustici and Leonardo” exhibit linked the 15th century sculptor with da Vinci, Verrocchio and others.

In Milan:

I loved Palazzo Reale’s “Salvatore Dali” exhibit.

Dali... Salvatore Dali...

Dali… Salvatore Dali… (Photo credit: michal.kolodziejski)

Museo Poldi Pezzoli‘s “Sandro Bottecelli Works from Lombardy” were incredible.

Perusia:

Palazzo Zabarella’s offered from “Canova to Modigliani: The Face of the 19th Century” with 100 portraits and sculptures..

Modigliani at the San Diego Museum of ArtModiliani painting slod for almost $69 million

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Guides. Learn more about Italy at www.vino-con-vista.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta

1 Comment

Filed under Baroque Art, Bernini, Caravaggio, ebooks, Florence, Italian art, Italy, Italy Travel Guides, Leonardo da VInci, Lombardy, Quirinale, Renaissance Art, Renaissance Artists, Travel and Tourism, Tuscany, UNESCO

The Easter Story: Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia...

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia Sophia. Ajoelhado à direita do Cristo Pantocrator está o imperador bizantino Leão VI. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearin...

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cross, from the monastery in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Beginning of 11th century

Beginning of 11th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who wa...

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who walks to St. Giles, Wrexham, in bare feet, on Maundy Thursday 2007. Photograph by Brian Roberts, Wrexham (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostl...

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostles. Icon of Pskov school. Русский: Омовение ног (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christ icon in Taizé

Christ icon in Taizé (Photo credit: lgambett)

Français : Christ en Croix d'Agnolo Allori, di...

Français : Christ en Croix d’Agnolo Allori, dit Bronzino, vers 1545, huile sur panneau, 145 x 115 cm, Musée des beaux-arts de Nice, France. Italiano: Cristo in croce di Agnolo Allori, detto Bronzino, circa 1545, olio su legno, 145 x 115 cm, Museo di belle-arti di Nizza, Francia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Jesus Christ - detail from Deesis mos...

English: Jesus Christ – detail from Deesis mosaic, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The three days before Easter are called the Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection of the Lord http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNFTNu1I4M.

This is a three day liturgical celebration. The liturgy held on the evening of Maundy Thursday initiates the Easter Triduum. This period includes Good Friday, Holy Saturday and ends Easter.

The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Triduum: “The night Jesus Christ broke the chains of death and rose triumphant from the grave.”  The church empties the Holy Water from the fonts on the days of the Sacred Paschal Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. The Passion is read three times during Holy Week: Passion Sunday, Holy Thursday and Good Friday. The words of Jesus are always read by a priest.

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholi...

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholic Holy Mass on Maundy Thursday / Crkva Svetoga groba u Jeruzalemu. Katolička sveta misa na Veliki četvrtak. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Icon of Jesus Christ

English: Icon of Jesus Christ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Holy Thursday (Maundy Thursday), the Pope performs a rare morning mass. “The Mass of the Chrism” is held in St. Peter’s Square when the oils are blessed and the Chrism is consecrated.  Chrism is a combination of balsam and oil and is used for annointing for occasions like confirmation and ordinations.

In the evening after sun-down, the Mass of the Lord’s Supper commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles. This event includes a reading of Matthew’s account of the “Passion of Christ“; the narration of Jesus’ capture, suffering and death. It includes the representation of Jesus Christ washing the feet of his Disciples which was carried out by Pope Benedict at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran where he washed the feet of 12 priests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngIUmGhwwqs.

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman...

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman sarcophagi. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Good Friday, the day of Christ’s brutal crucufixion in AD 33, choirs sing St. John’s version of Christ’s crucifixion. Peter Paul Rubens’ “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man) portrays Christ with his “Crown of Thorns” before his Crucifixion. After his crucifixion, he was covered with a shroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dVQnkKlphY&feature=relmfu.

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco - &...

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco – “Crucifixion of Jesus Christ” Русский: Мозаика баптистерия базилики Сан Марко – “Распятие Христово” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On this day in Catholic churches around the world, Christians glorify the cross in their individual parishes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubkiKyjo9WU. The cross is venerated as a symbol of our faith by kneeling in front of the cross and kissing it. In this way, we honor the Lord’s Cross as an instrument of our salvation. The cross was the means of Jesus Christ’s execution and as a sign of victory over sin and death. The church does not celebrate the Liturgy of the Eucharist on Good Friday, rather the Church commemorates the Lord’s Passion.

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a ser...

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a series depicting the stations of the Cross. Chapel Nosso Senhor dos Passos, Santa Casa de Misericórdia of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Oil on canvas, XIXth century, unknown author. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Rome on Good Friday, a solemn “Via Crucis Procession” (The Way of the Cross) involves an evening torch-lit procession that follows the Pope as he traces the Stations of the Cross from the Colosseum to Palatine Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwjLTFcwQ. The church in Rome adopted the practice of “Adoration of the Cross” from the Church in Jerusalem where a fragment of wood believed to be the Lord’s cross has been venerated every year on Good Friday since the fouth century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eDPyXYv50.

St. Helen, the mother of emperor Constantine, discovered this fragment of wood on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326. Pope Alexander VII had the top of the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square adorned with his insignia. There is a relic of Christ’s “True Cross” encased in this emblem of Pope Alexander that crowns the Obelisk.

Jesus had 12 disciples. They were pupils or followers of Christ. The Passion of Christ was initiated when the Temple Guards, guided by Judas Iscario, captured Jesus. Judas was a Disciple of Jesus who betrayed him by telling the guards that whomever he kisses, they should arrest. Judas was paid in silver for his betrayal which is portrayed  in “The Kiss of Judas.” The trial and painful crucifixion of Jesus ensued. Judas ended up returning the silver and committing suicide.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

5 Comments

Filed under Italy Travel Guides

Witness the Story of Easter in Rome: Buona Pasqua

c. 1580

c. 1580 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Master of the Tiburtine Sibyl Princeton

Master of the Tiburtine Sibyl Princeton (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Tiburtine Sybil, woodcut from the Nurember...

The Tiburtine Sybil, woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicle Français : La Sibylle Tiburtine, bois gravé tiré de la Chronique de Nuremberg, feuille 93 verso (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on ...

Image via Wikipedia

A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cro...

A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cross, from the monastery in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italiano: La Sibilla Tiburtina, 1483, affresco...

Italiano: La Sibilla Tiburtina, 1483, affresco nella Chiesa di S. Giovanni Evangelista a Tivoli (Roma). L’immagine è racchiusa in un tondo e deliminata in un anello bianco con il basso l’espressione SIC AIT riferito alla profezia che viene riportata sotto il ritratto. La profezia inizia all’interno del medaglione per proseguire al di sotto di esso. The Tiburtine Sibyl, 1483. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Tiburtine sibyl and the Emperor Augustus i...

The Tiburtine sibyl and the Emperor Augustus is a 16th-century chiaroscuro woodcut by Antonio da Trento. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pope Francis and the Vatican gear up for Holy Week Celebrations and ancient traditions in and around Rome. These events commemorate the last week of the life of Jesus Christ before his painful death on the cross and ultimate Resurrection.

The Tiburtine Sybil named Albunea, told Emperor Augustus (27 BC-AD 14) in a mystic meeting, that the first-born of God would one day rule his empire: “Haec est ara primogeniti Dei”-This is the altar of the first-born of God.

Augustus commemorated the spot by erecting an altar. The church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli (altar of Heaven) now crowns the highest point of the Campidoglio in Rome with 124 steps that lead to the entrance of the church. In the church, the figures of Augustus and the Tiburtine Sibyl are painted on either side of the arch above the high altar.

English: Santa Maria in Aracoeli (façade), Rome.

English: Santa Maria in Aracoeli (façade), Rome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antonio da Trento, Tiburtine Sibyl and the Emp...

Antonio da Trento, Tiburtine Sibyl and the Emperor Augustus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inside this church are the relics of St. Helen in a porphyry urn. Saint Helena was the mother of Emperor Constantine who ultimately decreed the Christianization of pagan Rome. Inside the church, there is a chapel of the Santo Bambino. The Bambino is carved from olive wood from Jerusalem using wood from the Garden of Gethsemane. It was created by a Franciscan monk in the 15th century.

Furthermore, the Tiburtine Sibyl prophesied a final Emperor named Constan who would “vanquish the foes of Christianity and end paganism.” Michelangelo portrayed the Sibyls in the frescos of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

The Tiburtine Sybil's prophecy to the Emperor ...

The Tiburtine Sybil’s prophecy to the Emperor Augustus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Easter story of the “Passion of Christ” is depicted in the 14 “Stations of the Cross.” The “INRI” on the cross is the abbreviation of “King of the Jews” in Hebrew. During his lifetime, Jesus encountered the same type of pain that normal people excounter. He endured physical pain, mental anguish, rejection, abandonment and betrayal. Holy Week allows us to recall the great sacrifice that Jesus made for all of us and signifies new beginnings.

Holy Week is one of the most religious and exciting times of the year to visit Rome and many other towns in Italy and Spain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZl_Ab29id4&NR=1. Holy Week events begin on Palm Sunday, also known as Passion Sunday. On this day, Jesus rode into Jerusalem on  a donkey and was welcomed as royalty with the path paved with branches and palms. The ceremonies during the week revolve around the story of the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. On Palm Sunday,  Holy Week begins with the Pope‘s blessing of the palms in St. Peter’s Square.

The three days before Easter are called the Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection of the Lord http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNFTNu1I4M. The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Triduum: “The night Jesus Christ broke the chains of death and rose triumphant from the grave.”  The church empties the Holy Water from the fonts on the days of the Sacred Paschal Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. The Passion is read three times during Holy Week: Passion Sunday, Holy Thursday and Good Friday. The words of Jesus are always read by a priest.

On Holy Thursday (Maundy Thursday), the Pope performs a rare morning mass. “The Mass of the Chrism” is held in St. Peter’s Square when the oils are blessed and the Chrism is consecrated.  Chrism is a combination of balsam and oil and is used for annointing for occasions like confirmation and ordinations.

In the evening after sun-down, the Mass of the Lord’s Supper commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles. This event includes a reading of Matthew’s account of the “Passion of Christ”; the narration of Jesus’ capture, suffering and death. It includes the representation of Jesus Christ washing the feet of his Disciples which was carried out by Pope Benedict at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran where he washed the feet of 12 priests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngIUmGhwwqs.

On Good Friday, the day of Christ’s brutal crucufixion in AD33, choirs sing St. John’s version of Christ’s crucifixion. Peter Paul Rubens’ “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man) portrays Christ with his “Crown of Thorns” before his Crucifixion. After his crucifixion, he was covered with a shroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dVQnkKlphY&feature=relmfu.

On this day in Catholic churches around the world, Christians glorify the cross in their individual parishes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubkiKyjo9WU. The cross is venerated as a symbol of our faith by kneeling in front of the cross and kissing it. In this way, we honor the Lord’s Cross as an instrument of our salvation. The cross was the means of Jesus Christ’s execution and as a sign of victory over sin and death. The church does not celebrate the Liturgy of the Eucharist on Good Friday, rather the Church commemorates the Lord’s Passion.

In Rome on Good Friday, a solemn “Via Crucis Procession” (The Way of the Cross) involves an evening torch-lit procession that follows the Pope as he traces the Stations of the Cross from the Colosseum to Palatine Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwjLTFcwQ. The church in Rome adopted the practice of “Adoration of the Cross” from the Church in Jerusalem where a fragment of wood believed to be the Lord’s cross has been venerated every year on Good Friday since the fouth century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eDPyXYv50.

St. Helen, the mother of emperor Constantine, discovered this fragment of wood on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326. Pope Alexander VII had the top of the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square adorned with his insignia. There is a relic of Christ’s “True Cross” encased in this emblem of Pope Alexander that crowns the Obelisk.

Jesus had 12 disciples. They were pupils or followers of Christ. The Passion of Christ was initiated when the Temple Guards, guided by Judas Iscario, captured Jesus. Judas was a Disciple of Jesus who betrayed him by telling the guards that whomever he kisses, they should arrest. Judas was paid in silver for his betrayal which is portrayed  in “The Kiss of Judas.” The trial and painful crucifixion of Jesus ensued. Judas ended up returning the silver and committing suicide.

On the Joseph Maria Subirachs “Magic Square” on the facade of Gaudi’s Sagada Familia in Barcelona (Quadrato magico di Sagrada Familia) next to “The Kiss of Judas” in the picture below, notice that all colums, diagonals and rows add up to 33, the year of the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Judas Betrayed Jesus Christ before his Crucifixion

Judas Kiss and the Magic Square of 33

Pictured above is Caravaggio’s famous portrayal of “The Kiss of Judas.”

On Holy Saturday, Jesus’  lifeless body was cradled in the arms of  Mary, as portrayed in Michelangelo’s “Pieta.”  He was then laid to rest in the borrowed grave of a friend. Churches around the world conduct an Easter Vigil where we celebrate Jesus Christ; our light who drives away the darkness of our lives http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3d9LTi_U2w&feature=relmfu. At the beginning of the Easter Vigil, the church is darkened and gradually springs to life with the Ressurection of the Lord as faithful parishoners light candles inside the church. The Easter Vigil service includes the Service of Light, the Blessing of the Fire and the Preparation of the Paschal Candle and Procession.

The gloomy darkness of Good Friday is followed by the joyful celebration of trumpets at Easter which “dispels all evil, washes guilt away, restores lost innocence, brings mourners joy, casts out hatred, brings us peace and humbles earthly pride” (Paschal Praeconium, the Exsultet). Easter Sunday celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. His Ascension into Heaven is the 40th day after Easter. On Easter Sunday, Pope Benedict delivers his blessing “Urbi et Orbi” (to the city and to the world) in St. Peter’s Square http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5axrSsEU_U0&feature=related.

In the picture below, Jesus Christ is ascending into Heaven above the altar of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain. The term apostle came into use after the Ascension of Jesus Christ when the disciples (followers) who had witnessed his resurrection, became apostles (ambassadors of the Gospel: evangelists and teachers). The true apostolic age ended when the last apostle died in about 100AD.

Gaudi's Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain

The Pope delivers several messages to faithful pilgrims between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBwIefKXY0s.

Here was the 2011 Easter Message in Italian http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0mEEVTPU2I

Happy Easter and have a wonderful Vino con Vista celebration with your family and friends!

 

Learn more about Rome  @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

14 Comments

Filed under Ancient Rome, Buona Pasqua, Colonna dell'Immacolata in Rome, Colosseum, Easter in Rome, Holy Week in Rome, Hotels in Rome, Italian Architecture, Italian art, Italy Travel Guides, Last Judgment, Papal ceremony in Rome for the Feast Day of the Immaculate Conception, Peter the Apostle, Rome, Rome History, Rome Italy, Saint Peter, Scavi Tour of Saint Peter's Basilica, St. Peter's Basilica, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

Elaborate Holy Week and Easter Rituals in Toledo Spain: Semana Santa

English: A five-segment panorama of the Tagus ...

English: A five-segment panorama of the Tagus River in Toledo, Spain. Taken with a Canon 5D and 24-105mm f/4L lens. Français : Vue panoramique du Tage à Tolède, en Espagne. Panorama obtenu en assemblant 5 clichés faits avec un appareil Canon 5D et un objectif 24-105mm f/4L. Română: O panoramă alcătuită din cinci fotografii a râului Tagus din Toledo, Spania. Realizată cu un Canon 5D şi obiectiv de 24-105mm f/4L. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bridge of Alcántara.

Image via Wikipedia

English: Toledo, Puerta de Bisagro

English: Toledo, Puerta de Bisagro (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: House of El Greco (partial view) : To...

English: House of El Greco (partial view) : Toledo, Spain. Español: Casa de El Greco (vista parcial) : Toledo, España (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Visit the historical city of Toledo Spain during Holy Week or on Easter. The charming UNESCO World Heritage City of Toledo Spain is the Toledo Spainrepository of more than 2000 years of history and architectural styles.  Toletum was the capital of Roman Carpetania.  It is an outstanding Vino con Vista destination, especially during Easter ceremonies. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site in 1986. Corpus Christi Week is the most important holiday in Toledo when the ground is covered with rosemary and thyme.

World Heritage Site Toledo Spain

The Mudejar architectural style of the Middle Ages, arose from the multi-cultural  interplay of forces among the three major religious groups who lived there: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Toledo has a broad spectrum of structures from the medieval period including walls and fortified buildings like San Servando Castle.  The former capital of Spain is about 42 miles southwest of Spain‘s newer capital city of Madrid. Felipe II transferred the Royal Court to Madrid in 1561.

The Assumption of the Virgin

The Assumption of the Virgin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Panorama of the Toledo skyline in Spain, at su...

Panorama of the Toledo skyline in Spain, at sunset. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The River Tagus loops around the historical gems of this fortified city and is crowned with gorgeous historic bridges. The Alcazar fortress occupies the highest point of the city and was used as a military base and fortress by the Romans, Arabs and Christians. Ultimately, it became the residence of King Alfonso VI and then Carlos V converted the building into a Royal Palace. Each facade of the fortress is different and reflects different architectural eras: The east facde is Medieval and the facade on the west is Renaissance. It houses the Army and Military Museum.

Toledo Spain

Coat of Arms

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

The Primal See in Toledo was using an old Mosque which was reconsecrated as the main church in 1086 by Alfonso VI. The Primada Cathedral was built between 1226 and 1493 on the site of a VIsigoth church. The Gothic Cathedral‘s first stone was ceremoniously laid in 1221. The Cathedral is brimming with art treasures and has a valuable collection of El Greco and Goya masterpieces.  Visit the beautiful chapels and the Renaissance Choir. The cathedral that was originally started in the sixth century by San Eugenio, the first Bishop of Toledo, was converted into a mosque that became the main church before the Gothic Cathedral was built.

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

El Greco is one of Spain’s most revered Renaissance artists. In March of 1586 he obtained the commission for The Burial of the Count of Orgaz. In 2014, the 400th anniversary of his death will be celebrated with special exhibitions in Toledo.

Detail of the painting.

Detail of the painting. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

El Greco - The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (d...

El Greco – The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (detail) – WGA10487 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

El Greco - The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (d...

El Greco – The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (detail) – WGA10490 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

El Greco self-portrait, 1604

El Greco self-portrait, 1604 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His 1586 masterpiece “El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (translates into the Burial of the Count of Orgaz) is located at the foot of the church of Santo Tome. The painting portrays Saint Augustine and Saint Steven in elegant golden vestments. They are preparing to  carry his life-less body to his tomb. The young boy holding the torch on the bottom left of the painting is El Greco’s son. The bearded gentleman directly above Saint Stephen is a self-portrait of El Greco.

The Holy Trinity, 1577–1579, by El Greco

The Holy Trinity, 1577–1579, by El Greco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of my favorite El Greco paintings in Toledo is “The Tears of Saint Peter”  which is displayed in the Studio of his Museum in Toledo. Tour the charming House and Museum of El Greco in Toledo Spain during Semana Santa. El Greco never lived in this place, but the house has a collection of his paintings. Another one of my favorite El Greco paintings is “Jesus Carrying the Cross.”

El Greco, The Burial of the Count of Orgaz

El Greco, The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

Toledo, the  former capital of Spain, sits majestically on a hilltop in the Castilla- La Mancha region immortalized by Miguel de Cervante’s famous “Don Quixote.”

Toledo Spain

Puerta del Sol Toledo Spain Toledo is 70 km so...

Puerta del Sol Toledo Spain Toledo is 70 km south of Madrid. It is the capital of the province of Toledo and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986 for its extensive cultural and monumental heritage as one of the former capitals of the Spanish , España Empire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Toledo was the temporary seat of Emperor Charles V. He endowed the city with the status of an imperial, crowned city. The fervor and devotion of Holy Week traditions of Semana Santa de Toledo are reminicient of 16th century Spanish traditions. Processions with residents dressed in hooded costumes signify the death and mourning of Jesus Christ. These solemn processions throughout the town during Holy Week, tell the story of the Passion and resurrection of Christ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4FCEnOPlng.

Detalle de Gonzalo Ruiz de Toledo en la pintur...

Detalle de Gonzalo Ruiz de Toledo en la pintura El entierro del conde de Orgaz de El Greco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cambrón Gate, Toledo, Spain Français : Porte d...

Cambrón Gate, Toledo, Spain Français : Porte de Cambrón, Tolède, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Semana Santa is a very special time in Spain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yOHWjOBYJY&feature=related.

Happy Easter from your Travel Buddies @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Toledo -Guadamur -castillo_3

Toledo -Guadamur -castillo_3 (Photo credit: ferlomu)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

7 Comments

Filed under Easter in Toledo Spain, ebooks, IPad, Roman Emperors, Semana Santa in Spain, Spanish Art and Architecture, Toledo Spain, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, UNESCO sites in Barcelona Spain, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites