Lyon France is a Vino con Vista UNESCO Site and the Capital of French Gastronomy and Architectural Heritage

‘Théâtre des Célestins’ Place des Célestins Lyon

‘Théâtre des Célestins’ Place des Célestins Lyon (Photo credit: FaceMePLS)

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

English: Basilica Notre-Dame de Fourvière as s...

English: Basilica Notre-Dame de Fourvière as seen from the top of the opera house at night, 12x zoom. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Arrondissements de Lyon

Français : Arrondissements de Lyon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Lyon, FRANCE Français : Place Belleco...

English: Lyon, FRANCE Français : Place Bellecour, Statue équestre de Louis XIV, à l’arrière plan une grande roue, Lyon, FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Lyon Toit de Notre-Dame de Fourvièr...

Français : Lyon Toit de Notre-Dame de Fourvière Clocher de l’église de 1852 Auteur : GIRAUD Patrick (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Vue contre plongée Notre Dame de Fr...

Français : Vue contre plongée Notre Dame de Frouviere (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Saône river in Lyon by night. Pho...

English: The Saône river in Lyon by night. Photo taken from the “La Feuillée” bridge”, facing North, the “Saint-Vincent” footbridge in the foreground and the Croix-Rousse hill in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lyon la Sâone et Fourvière

Lyon la Sâone et Fourvière (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Façade du 20, place Bellecour à Lyo...

Français : Façade du 20, place Bellecour à Lyon en France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Lyon : allégorie La Saône de Cousto...

Français : Lyon : allégorie La Saône de Coustou sous la statue de Louis XIV place Bellecour (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : allégorie du Rhône (Lyon) France

Français : allégorie du Rhône (Lyon) France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fourvière as seen from Vieux Lyon

Fourvière as seen from Vieux Lyon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Interior of the Basilique Notre-Dame de Fourvi...

Interior of the Basilique Notre-Dame de Fourvière, Lyon, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Interior of the Basilique Notre Dame ...

English: Interior of the Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvières, Lyon, France. Français : Intérieur de la Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvières, Lyon, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Blason de la ville de Lyon: De gueu...

Français : Blason de la ville de Lyon: De gueules au lion rampant, lampassé d’argent au chef d’azur chargé de trois fleurs de lys d’or (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christ with Apostles-MBA Lyon 1937-52-IMG 0626...

Christ with Apostles-MBA Lyon 1937-52-IMG 0626-0624 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Basilique de Fourvière (Lyon) vue de la Saône

Basilique de Fourvière (Lyon) vue de la Saône (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lyon

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

Courtesy of Musée des beaux-arts de Lyon

Courtesy of Musée des beaux-arts de Lyon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saint John the Baptist (Museum of Fine Arts of...

Saint John the Baptist (Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Palais St Pierre façade Terreaux Lyon 1 Musée ...

Palais St Pierre façade Terreaux Lyon 1 Musée des Beaux Arts (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lyon

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

Casino Lyon vert / Казино Лион вер

Casino Lyon vert / Казино Лион вер (Photo credit: mitko_denev)

Lyon France his the third largest city in France after Paris and Marseilles. It has plenty of interesting sites to see. There are 30 bridges that cross the Rhone and Saone River in Lyon.

Get a Lyon city card at the tourism office. Start with a tour on the Open-top bus or a riverboat tour. Then head over to the  Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des Beaux Arts). I love Old Lyon (Vieux Lyon) with Renaissance buildings, and Rue de la République, Lyon’s main shopping street. Vieux Lyon is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Lyon, was the capital of the Gauls and serves as the French world capital of gastronomy! It is actually called the “stomach of France” and has over 2000 restaurants with 15 Michelin stars.  Make reservations for some of the outstanding Michelin-rated restaurants like Paul Bocuse, Leon de Lyon, Nicolas Le Bec, Auberge de I’lle and La Rotonde at the Le Lyon Vert Casino.

You can dine at Paul Bocuse’s affordable Brasserie Le Sud near Place Bellecor or go to his 3-star L’Auberge du Pont de Collognes for a meal of a lifetime in the home where he was born and still lives http://www.bocuse.fr

 

Casino Lyon vert / Казино Лион вер

Casino Lyon vert / Казино Лион вер (Photo credit: mitko_denev)

 

According to Wikipedia, there are nine arrondissements of Lyon:

  • 1st arrondissement: Presqu’île north (Terreaux, Martinière/St-Vincent), Pentes de la Croix-Rousse – served by metro lines A, C and D
  • 2nd arrondissement : Presqu’île south (Cordeliers, Bellecour, Ainay, Perrache, Confluence) – served by metro lines A and D and tram lines T1 and T2
  • 3rd arrondissement: Préfecture, Guillotière north, Part-Dieu, Villette, Sans Souci/Dauphiné, Montchat, Grange Blanche north – served by metro lines B and D and tram lines T1 and T3
  • 4th arrondissement: Plateau de la Croix-Rousse, Serin – served by metro line C
  • 5th arrondissement: Vieux Lyon (St-Paul, St-Jean, St-Georges), Fourvière, St-Just, St-Irénée, Point du Jour, Ménival, Battières, Champvert south – served by metro line D and funicular lines F1 and F2
  • 6th arrondissement: Brotteaux, Bellecombe, Parc de la Tête d’Or, Cité Internationale – served by metro lines A and B and tram line T1
  • 7th arrondissement: Guillotière south, Jean Macé, Gerland – served by metro lines B and D and tram lines T1 and T2
  • 8th arrondissement: Monplaisir, Monplaisir-la-Plaine, États-Unis, Bachut, Grand Trou/Moulin à Vent, Mermoz, Laënnec/Transvaal, Grange Blanche south – served by metro line D and tram lines T2 and T4
  • 9th arrondissement: Vaise, Gorge de Loup, Observance, Duchère (Balmont, Château, Plateau, Sauvegarde), Rochecardon, St-Rambert-l’Île-Barbe, Champvert north – served by metro line D

Culinary and architectural heritage make Lyon a pleasant Vino con Vista destination with Beaujolais to the north and COtes du Rhone to the souuth. It is strategically located on Fourviere Hill with panoramic vistas of the Rhone and Saone rivers. In December, there is an outstanding four-day Festival of Lights.

Stay near the Place Bellecour, a lovely square between the Rhone and Saone Rivers where you will find a statue of Louis XIVth and two fabulous allegorical river statues at the base of the monument.

Statue of Louis XIV, Place Bellecour, Lyon, Fr...

Statue of Louis XIV, Place Bellecour, Lyon, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a link to some hotels near this square: http://www.booking.com/landmark/fr/bellecour.en.html?aid=314920;label=bellecour-OH6FRTjv7s3KPm2frH7VlwS1922174938;ws=&gclid=CPetttjtybwCFQsSMwodlnsARA

Français : Basilique de Fourvières, Lyon, France.

Lyon (Lugdunum) was founded as a Roman city in 43 BC and has two amphitheaters built into the hillside. Visit the Gallo-Roman Museum to admire sculptures, paintings and a bronze transcript of a speech given by Emperor Claudius.

Lyon

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

Here’s a video http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/872/video.

English: Lyon, Theatre Romain of Fourviere Fra...

English: Lyon, Theatre Romain of Fourviere Français : Théâtre romain de Fourvière à Lyon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The Roman city is represented by the buildings excavated on Fourvière. The large theatre, capable of seating some 10,000 spectators, was built in the early 1st century AD and reconstructed under Hadrian (117-38). Alongside it is the smaller odeon, seating around 3,000 people and probably built in the mid-1st century. The amphitheatre is on Croix-Rousse hill, and was built around 19 BC to accompany the altar dedicated to Rome and Augustus; it was here that the Council of the Three Gauls met each August.” UNESCO

There are plenty of interesting private houses in Lyon:

“The Thomassin House in the Place du Change (late 13th century, enlarged 15th century); the house of the poet Maurice Scève (1493; additional storey in the 17th century); the Chamberlain’s mansion (1495-1516), illustrating the transition from Gothic to French Renaissance style; the Mannerist house of the Lions (1647); the classical building on the Quai Lassagne (1760); and the House of 365 Windows, an example of the tenements built for the canuts (silk workers) in the first half of the 19th century.” UNESCO

Bas-relief: Nemesis, Allāt and the dedicator. ...

Bas-relief: Nemesis, Allāt and the dedicator. Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is also an interesting Lyon Musee des Beaux Arts. It is located in a lavish 17th century palace.

Interior of the Basilique Notre-Dame de Fourvi...

Interior of the Basilique Notre-Dame de Fourvière, Lyon, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Visit the beautiful churches in Lyon:  St. Jean Baptiste Cathedral (1160-1481); St. Paul and St. George.  Saint John’s has an interesting astrological clock with mechanical bell ringers. The Romanesque Abbey Church (1107); the Church of Saint-Nizier, begun in the 14th century has a “Flamboyant Gothic nave, classical Renaissance front, and neo-Gothic south spire.” UNESCO

Basilica Notre Dame de Fourviere, Lyon France.

Basilica Notre Dame de Fourviere, Lyon France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Three of the main sights in Lyon, the...

English: Three of the main sights in Lyon, the Cathedral St-Jean (near the river La Saone), the Basilica Notre Dame de Fourviere (on top of the hill), and the Tour métallique de Fourvière (to the right of the Basilica on top of the hill) Français : Vue de Lyon : la cathédrale Saint-Jean au premier plan, la basilique de Fourvière au sommet de la colline à gauche et la Tour métallique de Fourvière à droite de la basilique. On voit aussi la Saone. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wander over to the Basilique Notre Dame de Fourviere; Lyon’s favorite tourist destination.

Français : Basilique de Fourvières, Lyon, France.

Français : Basilique de Fourvières, Lyon, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Visit the chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary next to the Basilica with  fantastic views.

Lyon

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

You can get tickets for the National Opera and visit the other interesting museums including: the Fabric Museum and the Lumiere Institute. They also have an annual Grand Lyon Film Festival.

Lyon

Lyon (Photo credit: Guerric)

Here is the UNESCO Long Description:

“Lyons bears exceptional testimony to the continuity of urban settlement over more than two millennia on a site of great commercial and strategic significance, where cultural traditions from many parts of Europe have come together to create a coherent and vigorous continuing community. By virtue of the special way in which it has developed spatially, Lyons illustrates in an exceptional way the progress and evolution of architectural design and town planning over many centuries.

The site of Lyons is dominated by two hills: to the west Fourvière and to the east Croix-Rousse, the latter prolonged by a peninsula formed by alluvial deposits laid down at the confluence of the two rivers. The Rhône is a strongly flowing river that comes from the Alps. The Saône, by contrast, is a gentler and more easily navigable river, linking Lyons with the plains of north-eastern France.

The present city began with the Roman settlement on Fourvière, although the area of the confluence had been used by man for many centuries before. The Roman town spread to Croix-Rousse and the Peninsula, but shrank during the troubled 3rd century AD to two fortified areas: on the right bank of the Saône, at the foot of Fourvière, around the bishop’s estate, and a commercial district around the church of Saint-Nizier on the Peninsula.

By the mid-15th century it was one of the mostly heavily populated cities in Europe: there were 36 districts, each with its own mercantile attribution, and only the slopes of Croix-Rousse were not densely built on, being reserved for the ‘rural’ villas of rich German and Italian merchants and for vineyards. Overpopulation and the risk of epidemics led to the implementation of a policy of planned expansion starting in the mid-16th century and led by the religious orders. New districts were opened up in the 17th century, in particular the Bellecour area in the south, round the Place Royale (now the Place Bellecour). New projects undertaken in the 18th century involved extensive drainage works to the east and the linking of the peninsula to an adjoining island. During the Revolution, land confiscated from the religious orders became available for building. In 1850 several surrounding communes were incorporated into the city and major roads driven through the centre. The resulting urban fabric, visible today, is an epitome of the development of Lyons, with areas of medieval streets and of 18th-and 19th-century town planning alongside one another.

The Roman city is represented by the buildings excavated on Fourvière. The large theatre, capable of seating some 10,000 spectators, was built in the early 1st century AD and reconstructed under Hadrian (117-38). Alongside it is the smaller odeon, seating around 3,000 people and probably built in the mid-1st century. The amphitheatre is on Croix-Rousse hill, and was built around 19 BC to accompany the altar dedicated to Rome and Augustus; it was here that the Council of the Three Gauls met each August.

The succeeding centuries are well represented in the rich stock of private residences in Lyons – the Thomassin House in the Place du Change (late 13th century, enlarged 15th century); the house of the poet Maurice Scève (1493; additional storey in the 17th century); the Chamberlain’s mansion (1495-1516), illustrating the transition from Gothic to French Renaissance style; the Mannerist house of the Lions (1647); the classical building on the Quai Lassagne (1760); and the House of 365 Windows, an example of the tenements built for the canuts (silk workers) in the first half of the 19th century.

The public buildings include the late 11th-century Manécanterie (Choir School); the Ainay Abbey Church (1107) in full Romanesque style; the noble Cathedral of St John the Baptist (1160-1481), which preserves a remarkable degree of stylistic homogeneity, given the long period over which it was built; the Church of Saint-Nizier, begun in the 14th century,with its Flamboyant Gothic nave, classical Renaissance front, and neo-Gothic south spire; the 17th-18th century Hôtel-Dieu, built over a medieval original; the Loge du Change (1745-80), now a Protestant church; the Fourvière Basilica (1872-96); and the École de Tissage (Weaving School), the work of Modernist architect Tony Garnier (1927-33).

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

Historical Description

There was a Gaulish settlement here as early as the 4th century BC, to the west of the line of hills bordering the Saône. Although the area was marshy at that time, the settlement played an important role in trading with Marseille.

In 43 BC Lucius Munatius Plancus, governor of the Roman province of Gallia Transalpina, founded a town known as Lugdunum on one of these hills, Fourvière; it was granted the high status of colonia by the Senate, giving it important fiscal privileges. With the reorganization of the provinces of Gaul in 27 BC it became the capital of Gallia Lugdunensis and the headquarters of the Imperial government. A network of roads was built spreading outwards from Lugdunum, a factor that contributed significantly to its economic and political supremacy.

Lugdunum had a special status, since it was here that the Council of the Gauls met annually. Delegates from all the towns in the three provinces came together at the sanctuary dedicated to Rome and Augustus on the slopes of the Croix-Rousse.

Christianity was brought to Lugdunum by the Greeks from Asia Minor who had settled there in large numbers. In AD 177 the Christian community sent a letter to their co-religionists in Asia Minor, giving the names of 48 of their number who had suffered martyrdom in the Croix-Rousse amphitheatre, among them St Pothinus, first Bishop of Lyon. The church was, however, to recover quickly, and Ireneus, the successor of Pothinus, became the first great Christian theologian. In the 5th century this intellectual tradition was maintained by another son of Lugdunum, Sidonius Apollinaris.

In the period that followed the collapse of the Roman Empire of the West, Lyon survived as an important urban centre, and a number of important monastic communities established themselves there. In 843 it was assigned to Lotharingia by the Treaty of Verdun, and then passed to the Burgundian kingdom. It became the centre of the County of Lyon, the lordship of which was conferred by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa to the Archbishop of Lyon in 1157. Although small, the County was influential, by virtue both of its independent status and of its commercially and politically strategic location. The Archbishopric was also important, since Pope Gregory VII had conferred the title of “Primate of the Gauls” on its holders in 1078. It was especially favoured by the Papacy, and several pontiffs were crowned there.

This independence came to an end in 1312, when Philip the Fair annexed the city to the Kingdom of France. However, its commercial significance was unaffected and it continued to prosper. During the first half of the 16th century Lyon also became the base for French political activities in Italy. As a result it was frequently visited by the French court, bringing many artists in its train.

During the reign of Louis XI (1461-83) four annual fairs were established, which drew merchants from all over Europe, especially Italy (and Florence in particular). Lyon became a major centre for the spice trade and, even more importantly, the silk trade, following the authorization by François I of weaving privileges, hitherto an Italian monopoly. The Florentine immigrants also made Lyon a financial centre for banking and insurance.

The first printing establishment was set up in Lyon in 1472, and it quickly became one of the most important printing and publishing centres in Europe, behind Venice and Paris, producing books in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Italian, and Spanish as well as French. The works of Erasmus, Rabelais, Scaliger, More, Poliziano, and many other intellectual leaders were published by the Württemberger Sebastian Gryphe, who set up in Lyon.

When French policy turned away from Italy in the 1550s, Royal visits to Lyon became less frequent. It was also caught up in the Religious Wars and in 1562 was seized by Protestant troops. Lyon was the location of the meeting that resulted in 1601 in large parts of the Dukedom of Savoy being added to the French kingdom.

Lyon lost the considerable degree of autonomy that it had hitherto enjoyed around this time, but its commercial and industrial importance was not abated. During the 17th and 18th centuries its pre-eminence in silk production was unchallenged, and inventors like Vaucanson and Jacquard made far-reaching contributions to this industry.

The geographical situation of Lyon meant that many artists and architects passed through it on their way to and from Italy, and their influence is plain to see in many buildings of the period, such as the Hôtel-Dieu and the Loge du Change. During the 18th century the expansion resulting from increased prosperity indicated the need for a measure of systematic town planning, and this was carried out by a series of brilliant planners and architects such as de Cotte, Soufflot, Morand, and Perrache.

When Napoleon I imposed the use of Lyonnais silk on all the courts of Europe the industry boomed. New tenements with workshops were built for the craftsmen (canuts). Lyon was to see the first Conseil des Prud’hommes (labour litigation court) in 1806 and the first cooperative grocery store in 1835. Between 1800 and 1848 the number of looms in operation increased tenfold, from 6000 to 60,000, and over 90,000 people were employed in the industry. However, relations between the workers who produced the silk and the merchants who sold it were always uneasy, and Lyon also saw the first worker demonstrations in 1831 and 1834. This was to come to an end with the authoritarian policies of the Second Empire.

The wealth of Lyon and its worldwide mercantile contacts attracted banks from the Far East to the city as well as encouraging the creation of banking institutions by the Lyonnais themselves. This led in turn to investment in land in Algeria, Madagascar, and southeast Asia: the port of Haiphong was created with Lyonnais investment.

This concern with non-Christian countries outside Europe had another important effect on Lyon, which was to become the leading centre of missionary activities in the Catholic world. The earliest institution to be founded was the Propagation de la Foi (1822), to be followed by bodies such as the Pères Maristes (1836), the Pères des Missions africaines (1856), and the Soeurs de Notre Dame des Apôtres.

In the present century Lyon has moved its industrial base from silk to other sectors, such as automobiles, textile chemicals, and pharmacy, from which it has continued to enjoy a considerable degree of prosperity.” UNESCO.org

 

Itinerary

Lyon Hop-On Hop-Off Tour Stops:

  1. Place Bellecour
  2. Terreaux
  3. Mur peint/Saint Vincent
  4. Marché Saint Antoine
  5. Saint Jean/Vieux Lyon
  6. Confluence
  7. Notre Dame de Fourvière
  8. Parc des Hauteurs
  9. Beaux Arts
  10. Cordeliers/République
  11. Berges du Rhône
  12. Rhône Cruise

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com

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Filed under Italy Travel Guides, Lyon France is a UNESCO Site and the Capital of French Gastronomy and Architectural Heritage

Vino con Vista Vezelay France: The Way of Saint James and the Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela to Spain

Saint James on the middle pier

Saint James on the middle pier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), ...

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), is the pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela where legend has it that the remains of the apostle, Saint James the Great. The route was declared the first European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe in October 1987; it was also named one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites in 1993. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de ...

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de Compostela Galego: Cruceiro en Laraño, Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. James's shell, a symbol of the route, on a...

St. James’s shell, a symbol of the route, on a wall in León, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Reliquary with a supposed head of St....

Vezelay is a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the Route of Santiago de Compostela in France. Recently, I traveled to the picturesque Vino con Vista village of Vezelay France in the Yonne department in northern Burgundy where Bourgogne Vezelay is the local wine appellation.

This town has a magnificent Basilica on the route called Santiago de Compostela with the remains of Saint Mary Magdelene. This pilgrimage has been done for centuries by pious pilgrims who converged there from all over Europe throughout the Middle Ages on their way to Santiago de Compostela, at the foot of the St. James the Apostle’s tomb in Spain.

Santiago’s city center is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Praza do Obridorio is a wide city plaza that contains the medieval Cathedral of St. James (also known as Santiago). The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela is one of the most famous sites for religious pilgrimages in Spain. You can visit the Museo das Pergrinacions (Museum of Pilgrimage). In this town you should also consider a visit to the Museo do Pobo Galego (Museum of Galician People).

Saint James, the brother of St. John the Evangelist,  is the patron saint of Spain. His remains are in Santiago de Compostela in Galicia. His feast day is on July 25th. The traditional pilgrimage to the grave of the saint, known as the “Way of St. James“, has been the most popular pilgrimage for Western European Catholics since the Early Middle Ages.

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Ba...

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Bavaria ). Fresco at ceiling of the nave: Saint James the Less ( apostle ). Deutsch: Klosterkirche Niederaltaich ( Niederbayern ). Deckenfresco im Langhaus: Apostel Jakobus minor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He was the first Apostle to be martyred. It is believed that the completion of the pilgrimage will forgive all of your sins.

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on...

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on the Via Turenensis (Tours route) for the Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle. The World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France lists the major French towns with stamps. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pilgrimages were an essential part of western European spiritual and cultural life in the Middle Ages. The routes that they took were equipped with facilities for the spiritual and physical well-being of pilgrims. Watch this UNESCO video to better understand this pilgrimage: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/video This was the first officially recognized “European Cultural Route” in 1987: the Way of St. James route (The French Way) to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

 

“The Route of St James of Compostela has preserved the most complete material record in the form of ecclesiastical and secular buildings, settlements both large and small, and civil engineering structures. This Route played a fundamental role in facilitating the two-way interchange of cultural developments between the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of Europe during the Middle Ages.” UNESCO

 

Although there are three basic Christian pilgrimage routes in Europe; the other two pilgrimage routes, to Jerusalem and Rome, are not organized in the same manner.

“In addition to its enormous historical and spiritual value, the route  represents a remarkable display of European artistic and architectural evolution over several centuries. The different pilgrimage routes that converged on Santiago de Compostela, are lined with works of art and architectural creations. The cultural heritage represents the birth of Romanesque art; Gothic cathedrals and  monasteries. The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. The French routes include: Regions of Aquitaine, Auvergne, Basse-Normandie, Bourgogne, Centre, Champagne-Ardenne, Ile-de-France, Languedoc-Roussillon, Limousin, Midi-Pyrénées, Picardie, Poitou-Charentes, and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

To reach Spain pilgrims had to pass through France, using specific routes with important historical monuments. Here’s a series of pictures of the pilgrimage stops along the routes: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/

Here’s the UNESCO inscription:

The Pilgrimage Route of Santiago de Compostela played a key role in religious and cultural exchange and development during the later Middle Ages, and this is admirably illustrated by the carefully selected monuments on the routes followed by pilgrims in France. The spiritual and physical needs of pilgrims travelling to Santiago de Compostela were met by the development of a number of specialized types of edifice, many of which originated or were further developed on the French sections.

After Jerusalem was captured by the Caliph Omar in 638, Christians were hesitant about going to the Holy City as pilgrims. Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, where the tomb of the apostle St James the Great, who brought Christianity to the Iberian peninsula, had been founded around 800, benefited from the decline of Jerusalem as a pilgrimage centre.

Santiago began as a local religious centre, becoming the See of a bishopric around 900, but its renown grew rapidly after the visit in 951 of Godescalc, Bishop of Le Puy and one of the first foreign pilgrims to be recorded. From the 11th century onwards, pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela reached its apogee. Thousands of pilgrims, among them kings and bishops, travelled long distances to pray at the tomb of one of Christ’s closest companions. This flowering coincided with that of the Cluniac Order, which encouraged the worship of relics by publishing Lives of the Saints and Collections of Miracles. From the 11th-13th centuries ‘staging post’ churches developed along the pilgrimage route, and in particular in France.

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compo...

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia Galego: Cruceiro en Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galiza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. Thus, the start of the Paris route saw the convergence of routes from Boulogne, Tournai, and the Low Countries, while routes from Caen, Mont-Saint-Michel, and Brittany joined it at intermediate points such as Tours, Poitiers, Saint-Jean d’Angély and Bordeaux (the port for pilgrims coming by sea from England and coastal areas of Brittany and Normandy). Le Puy was the link with the Rhône valley, whereas those coming from Italy passed through Arles. The three western routes converged at Ostabat, crossing the Pyrenees by means of the Ibaneta pass, while the eastern route from Arles used the Somport pass; the two routes joined in Spain at Puente-la-Reina.

The places of worship along the pilgrimage routes in France range from great structures such as Saint-Sernin at Toulouse or Amiens Cathedral to parish churches. All are included either because they figure on the guide produced by Aymeric Picaud (Saint-Front Cathedral at Périgueux or the Church of Saint-Léonard de-Noblat) or because they contain important relics and other material that connect them directly with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Certain churches exhibit architectural characteristics that permit them to be given the appellation of ‘pilgrimage churches’. Sainte-Foy at Conques, Saint-Sernin at Toulouse, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela itself in particular have in common large transepts and apsidal chapels ranged round a spacious ambulatory, designed to meet the liturgical needs of pilgrims.

Pilgrimages in the Middle Ages imposed considerable hardships on the pilgrims, such that they were often in need of medical treatment and care. Few of these survive intact on the French sections of the route and are included in the World Heritage site. A number of bridges are known as ‘pilgrims’ bridges’, and that over the Borade at Saint-Chély-d’Aubrac even has the figure of a pilgrim carved on it. Of special importance are the Pont du Diable over the Hérault at Aniane, one of the oldest medieval bridges in France, and the magnificent 14th-century fortified Pont Valentré over the Lot at Cahors.

While the course of the different routes is generally known, very little of them survive in anything approaching their original form. The seven stretches included in the site are all on the Le Puy route, and cover a little over 20% of its total length. These are relatively minor roads whose course has not changed significantly since the Middle Ages; they are also lined with monuments associated with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, such as crosses and modest places of worship.”

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

The pilgrimage begins at Romanesque Vezelay Abbey. The Basilica of St. Mary Magdalene Basilique (Sainte-Marie-Madeleine) dominates the hilly Burgundy landscape.

 

Vézelay

Vézelay (Photo credit: gcorret)

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Mai...

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Maison natale de Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Fontaine-lès-Dijon, Côte-d’Or, Bourgogne,FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: louis VII of france

English: louis VII of france (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ascension of Mary Magdalene

Ascension of Mary Magdalene (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Map of the way of St James In Europe

Map of the way of St James In Europe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy,...

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy, 16th century. Part of the feet were restored in the 19th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of ...

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of steps leading to the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Sa...

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain) Galego: Apóstolo Santiago, Pazo de Raxoi, Santiago, Galicia (Spain) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bourgogne - Vezelay - Basilique Sainte-Madelei...

Bourgogne – Vezelay – Basilique Sainte-Madeleine – Façade avant (Photo credit: Francis Fantoni)

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A C...

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A Coruña, Spain which houses the tomb of St. James son of Zebedee. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence ...

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence of Bernard of Clairvaux, shown here in a 13th century illuminated manuscript. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Walk in the footsteps of the pilgrims and the Crusaders at the Vezelay Abbey.  It has a long history of links to the Crusades.

The church was dedicated on April 21, 1104. It became such a popular pilgrimage site that Pope Innocent II extended the narthex to accomodate them in 1132.

Crusaders gathered around Saint Bernard of Clairvaux when he preached for a 2nd Crusade on Easter 1146, in the presence of King Louis VII. Saint Bernard was canonized by Pope Alexander III on January 18, 1174.

 In 1190, Richard I of England (Richard the Lion-Hearted) and Phillip II of France spent three months here before leaving for the 3rd Crusade. The church was sacked by the Huguenots in 1569 and severely damaged during the French Revolution.
 
Vezelay France

Vezelay France

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Vezelay

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Vezelay

Vezelay

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The church became a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979. In 1987, the European Union declared the Camino de Santiago to be the first European Cultural Itinerary.

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux - Sint Ber...

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht, The Netherlands. By Jean Sondeijker, 1946. Nederlands: Sint Bernardus van Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht. Door Jean Sondeijker, 1946. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 
 
 
 
Vézelay’s hilltop location made it an obvious site for a town since ancient times. In the 9th century the Benedictines were given land to build a monastery. According to legend, not long before the end of the first millennium, a monk named Baudillon brought relics (bones) of Mary Magdalene to Vézelay from Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume

 

 

 

 

When you climb the hill to the Basilica you will notice the shells on the street. Climb the crest to the summit of the hill climbed by  millions of pilgrims as they make their way to Compostella Spain to venerate the remains of St. James, the Apostle. For more than a thousand years, pilgrims have walked the Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James), “seeking penance, enlightenment, and adventure.” Santiago de Compostela was proclaimed the first European Cultural itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987. There are about 1,800 historic buildings along the route.

The shells on the street indicate that this is the Way of Saint James; the Camino de Santiago. Four major routes through France lead to the Spanish Cathedral in Galicia including: Paris through Tours (Via Turonensis), Vézelay (Via Lemovicensis) and Le Puy-en-Velay.

When I climbed the steep slope to the magnificent church, I saw many pilgrims on their way into

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : nart...

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : narthex, tympan de droite (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the Basilica. When I entered the church, they had congregated in the narthex under the central tympanum and began praying. The tympanum depicts a benevolent Christ with arms wide open, flanked on both sides by his Apostles conveying his message to them. He is sending the Crusaders out; they were guaranteed remission of their sins if they participated in the Crusades.

 

I followed the pilgrims  into the church where they walked over to the staircase next to the statue of Saint Mary Magdelene. When they walked down the stairs, they arrived at her shrine with her relics. They began praying and singing. Although I have been to Lourdes and Fatima, I can honestly say that this was one of the most moving spiritual displays of faith that I have ever witnessed.

 

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th ce...

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th century tympanum, Romanesque sculpture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Saint Mary Magdalene was recognized by early church fathers as “the apostle to the apostles”. According to the Gospel, she “stood in the presence of the risen Jesus and went to tell the other disciples the news of the Resurrection”.

Shortly after its foundation in the 9th century, the Cluniac Benedictine abbey of Vezelay acquired the relics of St. Mary Magdalene and has been an important pilgrimage ever since. Her relics were transfered from her sepulchre in the Dominican oratory of Saint Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume at Aix en Provence to protect them from the Saracens. In 1058, Pope Stephen IX, confirmed the authenticity of the relics, leading to an influx of pilgrims that has continued to this day.

 

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de ...

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNESCO:

“The tradition whereby the Apostle St James the Great preached the Gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century. In the Latin Breviary of the Apostles, St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain. It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom. In the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was ‘discovered’ in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.”

“There are two access routes into Spain from France, entering at Roncesvalles (Valcarlos Pass) and Canfranc (Somport Pass) respectively; they merge west of Pamplona, just before Puente la Reina. It passes through 166 towns and villages, and it includes over 1,800 buildings of historic interest; in many cases the modern road runs parallel to the ancient route. The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, although its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.” UNESCO

 

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

 

UNESCO Historical Description

“The tradition whereby the apostle St James the Great preached the gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century, in the Latin Breviary of the Apostles. St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles, he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain.

It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom, and in the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was “discovered” in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, Bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.

The fame of the tomb of St James, protector of Christendom, quickly spread across western Europe and it became a place of pilgrimage, comparable with Jerusalem and Rome. By the beginning of the 10th century pilgrims were coming to Spain on the French routes from Tours, Limoges, and Le Puy, and facilities for their bodily and spiritual welfare began to be endowed along what gradually became recognized as the formal pilgrimage route, whilst in Compostela itself a magnificent new basilica was built to house the relics of the apostle, along with other installations – churches, chapels, hospices, and hospitals. The 12th century saw the Route achieve its greatest influence, used by thousands of pilgrims from all over Western Europe. In 1139 the first “guidebook” to the Route appeared, in the form of Book V of the Calixtine Codex (attributed to Pope Calixtus II but most probably the work of the pilgrim Ayrneric Picaud), describing its precise alignment from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela and listing the facilities available to pilgrims. These structures, ranging from humble chapels and hospices to magnificent cathedrals, represent every aspect of artistic and architectural evolution from Romanesque to Baroque and beyond, demonstrating the intimate linkages between faith and culture in the Middle Ages. The establishment of the pilgrimage route inevitably led to its adoption as a commercial route, resulting in economic prosperity for several of the towns along its length.

The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, though its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.”

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Tympan (externe) de l'abbatiale de Vézelay

Tympan (externe) de l’abbatiale de Vézelay (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

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Michelin-Starred Restaurants in Chicago for Valentine’s Day

Dessert at Alinea. This dessert, called Chocol...

Dessert at Alinea. This dessert, called Chocolate Finale is ‘plated’ directly on the table by one of the Alinea chefs, illustrating the movement’s interest in subverting dining expectations. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cuisine 3 etoiles de Jacques Lameloise

Cuisine 3 etoiles de Jacques Lameloise (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here are some Michelin-Starred Restaurants for Chicago that offer outstanding menus for Valentine’s Day. Note that restaurants new to the list in 2014 are marked with an asterisk after their names.

In 2014, Chicago had 25 Michelin-starred restaurants, up from 19 last year. Chicago was awarded a total of 31 Michelin stars with Grant Achatz‘s Alinea maintaining its standing as the city’s only three-star restaurant in Chicago.

Here’s a link to the 2015 list:

http://chicago.eater.com/2014/11/11/7190461/chicago-michelin-stars-2015

***Three Star Restaurants

**Two Star Restaurants

  1. Grace
  2. Sixteen in Trump Tower
  3. L2O
  4. Graham Elliott

*One Star Restaurants

  1. Blackbird
  2. Boka
  3. El Ideas*
  4. Elizabeth*
  5. Everest
  6. Goosefoot
  7. The Lobby*
  8. Longman & Eagle
  9. Mexique
  10. Moto
  11. NAHA
  12. North Pond*
  13. Schwa
  14. Senza*
  15. Acadia
  16. Sepia
  17. Spiaggia
  18. Takashi
  19. Topolobampo
  20. Tru

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Valentine’s Day Restaurants that I Love in Chicago

Chocolate Bar at the Peninsula Hotel in Chicago

Image by benchilada via Flickr

Oysters and Oatmeal dish from Schwa in Chicago

Oysters and Oatmeal dish from Schwa in Chicago (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Chicago River is the south border of ...

English: Chicago River is the south border of the Near North Side and Streeterville and the north border of Chicago Loop, Lakeshore East and Illinois Center (viewed from Lake Shore Drive with Trump International Hotel and Tower at jog in the river in the center. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Joe's Stone Crab

Joe’s Stone Crab (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Location of Schwa (restaurant) in Chi...

English: Location of Schwa (restaurant) in Chicago in detail south of North Avenue (Chicago), north of Division Street (Chicago), east of Milwaukee Avenue (Chicago) and west of Chicago River and Kennedy Expressway (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chicago Skyline

Chicago Skyline (Photo credit: Frank Kehren)

Here’s are some of the restaurants that I love!

1. The impressive Lobby Restaurant of the Peninsula Hotel offered a starter buffet of roasted vegetables, crabmeat ceviche over a medley of fresh fruit and an assortment of cheeses and charcuterie options. I usually order  the salmon.

2.  Sepia is a delightful restaurant in Chicago. The dining room is located in a former 1890’s print studio and it is filled with photography memorabilia. Executive chef Andrew Zimmerman graduated first in his class at the prestigious French Culinary Institute and it is reflected in his Meditterranean influenced cuisine. The urban eatery has exposed brick walls and is located at 123 N. Jefferson Street in Chicago just east of the Kennedy Expressway between Washington and Randolf. I love the porchetta.

Restaurant Week Chicagao 2011

Sepia Restaurant in Chicago

3. NAHA is located at 500 N. Clark St. where executive chef Carrie Nahabedian merges her Armenian roots with Mediterranean influenced flavors that earned her a Michelin star. She was the former executive chef at the Four Seasons Properties in Beverly Hills and Santa Barbara. I love the  braised Mishima Ranch “Kobe” Wagyu Beef Brisket with Beluga lentils, bacon roasted parsnips and carrots. For dessert order bananas with vanilla mousseline and salted caramel.

Restaurant Week Chicago 2011

4. David Burke”s Primehouse is located in the James Hotel at 616 N. Rush. I love the Surf and Turf Dumplings filled with lobster mousse or braised short-ribs. Have a dry-aged classic fillet served with a side of mushrooms and mashed potatoes. For dessert, I enjoy the pinapple upside down cake with rum caramel and sour cherry sorbet.

5. Le Colonial has one of my favorite French-Vietnamese inspired menus. It is located Rush Street and is housed in a two-story vintage townhouse  decorated in the millieu of 1920’s Siagon. I indulge in the Cha Gio for starters; these fried spring rolls are outstanding! Follow up with the “Bun Thit Nuong”;  BBQ pork served over angel-hair noodles. For dessert try, the crispy banana wonton.

Restaurant Week in Chicago

6. Schwa’s Chef Michael Carlson worked under Spiaggia’s chef Paul Bartolotta. He turned down the position of sous-chef at Alinea. Since then he has earned a string of prestigious press:  he graced the cover of Food & Wine magazine as one of the Best New Chefs, won the Jean Banchet Award for rising chef of the year, GQ magazine did a nine-page feature on Schwa and Chef Carlson saying that Schwa was “The Most Revolutionary Restaurant In America” and in 2010 he got a “Best Chef” nomination from the esteemed James Beard Foundation. Schwa is at 1466 N. Ashland in Wicker Park seats 26 people; good luck getting in. There is no liquor license or wine list. Just amazing food! Call 773-252-1466 for reservations.

Famed Quail Egg Ravioli from Schwa in Chicago

Famed Quail Egg Ravioli from Schwa in Chicago (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Our Philosophy – A restaurant that is part of a new movement; a community of chefs who work collaboratively and share openly. A house with no front or back; a house where chefs are servers, and serving is about creating dialogue. A menu that moves with the seasons; a menu designed to illustrate the diversity of a dish and highlight how one ingredient can be presented in a variety of ways. Taking the unusual and making it enjoyable. Taking the rustic and making it unforgettable.” http://www.schwa.com

Schwa (restaurant)

Schwa (restaurant) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

7. The Atwood Cafe in the loop on State Street is one of my favorite dining rooms and is located in the elegantly-renovated Hotel  Burnham across from Macy’s on Washington. I love the Ahi Tuna appetizer. They serve one of the best pork chops in town. The chocolate dessert is always decadent.

Upper facade

Upper facade (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

8. Blackbird’s award-winning restaurant at 619 W. Randolph has fabulous seared scallops for a starter with a roasted chicken entree and a choclate ganache dessert.

9. Joe’s Seafood, Prime Steak and Stone Crab at 60 E. Grand is the Chicago outpost of Miami’s legendary Joe’s Stone Crab. For dinner have a cup of chowder of bisque with crab claws, king crab legs or steak and don’t leave without indulging in the famous key lime pie for dessert.

10. I also love Terzo Piano at the Art Institute and Aria on Chicago’s east side at the Fairmont Hotel  http://www.ariachicago.com.

11. You can never go wrong at Piccolo Sogno, one of my all time favorites Italian restaurants in Chicago!

For French Food head over to Les Nomades in a lavish Streeterville townhouse. You will never be disappointed!

.Happy Valentine’s Day!

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Salute and Buon Appetito 

English: Executive Chef and Owner of the Stant...

Image via Wikipedia

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Architectural Art Deco Gems in South Beach Florida

Beach Bunny in South Beach

English: Ocean Drive, South Beach, Miami, Flor...

English: Ocean Drive, South Beach, Miami, Florida 2009 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ocean Drive on South Beach at night featuring ...

Ocean Drive on South Beach at night featuring The Beacon Hotel, The Colony Hotel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There’s a little square-mile stretch of Beach-Bunny paradise in the southern part of Miami Beach called “South Beach.”  South Beach is east of Downtown Miami, across Biscayne Bay.

English: A photograph taken of Ocean Drive in ...

English: A photograph taken of Ocean Drive in Miami Beach, Florida. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This area has an incredible annual South Beach Food and Wine Festival the last weekend of February. The annual event showcases many of the world’s top chefs, spirits producers, and culinary personalities. The event is hosted by Florida International University‘s (FIU) School of Hospitality and Tourism Management. Proceeds from the festival go to the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management’s Teaching Restaurant and the Southern Wine & Spirits Beverage Management Center at FIU.

South Beach Food and Wine Festival 2012

This archtectural district is pretty compact so it’s relatively easy to walk around and be transported to another era. Most of the interesting buildings have been beautifully restored.

Architecture at night - South Beach, Miami, Fl...

Architecture at night – South Beach, Miami, Florida, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Miami Beach Architectural District (also known as Old Miami Beach Historic District or the Miami Art Deco District) is a U.S. historic district; designated on May 14, 1979.

Miami Beach Poster

This area is located in the South Beach neighborhood of Miami Beach, Florida. The district is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Sixth Street to the south, Alton Road to the west, the Collins Canal and Dade Boulevard to the north. It contains 960 historic buildings.

South Beach Map

English: Panoramic image of South Beach, the s...

Image via Wikipedia

The Ocean Drive area received Historic District designation thanks to the efforts of Barbara Baer Capitman and her fellow Art-Deco loving Miami Design Preservation League activists.

Berkeley Hotel on Collins in South Beach

VIntage Posters in South Beach

The Art Deco era was ushered in with the Paris Exposition of 1925 ; the French name is “Les Arts Decoratifs.

There are two distinctive design principles that characterize the geometric facade of these buildings: (1) the center element is the most dramatic; (2) the sides of the facade are symmetrical. A good example is the Berkeley Shore Hotel shown in the picture above. South Beach has a distinctive Tropical Art Deco Style.

Colony Hotel - South Beach, Miami, Florida, USA.

Colony Hotel – South Beach, Miami, Florida, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The “Miami Beach Architectural District embodies the design continuum of the City from its early development Period in the 1910’s to the construction Boom following World War II. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 largely through the efforts of Barbara Baer Capitman, founder of the Miami Design Preservation League. Its one square mile area includes over 800 significant structures with the following architectural styles: Mediterranean Revival, Art Deco, Streamline Modern and Miami Modern or “MiMo.” The Colony Hotel is the oldest Art Deco Hotel in South Beach!

The Colony Hotel in South Beach

I love South Beach Florida

Art Deco Welcome Center in South Beach

Stop at the Art Deco Welcome Center to pick up a map. Plan a walking tour with a headset. Here are some intersting examples of architectural gems in South Beach on Ocean Drive and Collins Avenue :

The Carlyle Hotel at 1250 Ocean Drive in South Beach

There have been many movies filmed in South Beach: the Carlyle Hotel is where the “Birdcage” was filmed starring Robin Williams at 1250 Ocean Drive.

The Carlyle at Night

The Cardozo at 1300 Ocean Drive

Hotels in South Beach Florida

The Edison Hotel in South Beach

The Cardozo Hotel at 1300 Ocean Drive has a sweeping front porch that gracefully curves around the corner and represents “Streamline Style.”

This is where Frank Sinatra filmed “A Hole in the Head” in the 1950’s.

Cover of "A Hole in the Head"The Cardozo hotel was named after the Supreme Court justice and it has been lovingly rehabbed by  Gloria and Emilio Estefan in an Asian Motif. Walk into the hotel to admire the vintage poster collection.

The charming Beacon Hotel is where the movie “Scarface” was filmed with Al Pacino. Check out the photos at the end of this post to see the interior of the Beacon Hotel.

After your walking Tour, have a refreshing Miami Vice with a “Rum Floater” (presented in a test tube) at the Cleavelander Hotel on Ocean Drive as you listen to live music. Everyone loves the Cleavlander!

English: Digital photo taken by Marc Averette....

English: Digital photo taken by Marc Averette. A typical winter day on South Beach, Miami Beach, Florida (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Have a Miami Vice at the Cleavlander on Ocean Drive in South Beach

Hotels in South Beach Florida

Lobby at the Beacon in South Beach

Scar Face was filmed at the Beacon in South Beach

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

The Beacon Hotel Poster.The Majestic

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My Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend in South Beach Florida

The Clay Hotel on Española Way and Washington ...

The Clay Hotel on Española Way and Washington Avenue (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Miami

Miami (Photo credit: Dykes And The City)

Ocean Drive on South Beach at night featuring ...

Ocean Drive on South Beach at night featuring The Beacon Hotel, The Colony Hotel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Have a Glorious Vino con Vista Weekend in South Beach Florida. South Beach is a dynamic neighborhood in the city of Miami Beach, Florida. This section of Miami Beach was developed, starting in the 1910s, by Carl G. Fisher, the Lummus Brothers and John S. Collins.

Here’s my South Beach Video with highlights some of my favorite destinations: http://youtu.be/gkS7YxBUYEU

Lummus Park in the City of Miami Beach

Lummus Park in the City of Miami Beach

Here are some great sites to see:

Panoramic image of South Beach, the southern e...

Panoramic image of South Beach, the southern end of Miami Beach in Miami, Florida Español: Imagen panorámica de South Beach, la punta más sur de Miami Beach en Miami, Florida (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Miami Beach - South Beach: Beach Patrol Headqu...

Miami Beach – South Beach: Beach Patrol Headquarters (Photo credit: wallyg)

1. In front of Ocean Drive, Lummus Park Beach stretches for ten blocks. If you’re a beach bunny like me, you will love this Lummus Park Beach!

English: South Beach Miami lifeguard post 2009

English: South Beach Miami lifeguard post 2009 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

South Beach / Miami Florida

South Beach / Miami Florida (Photo credit: joanna8555)

After a 1992 hurricane destroyed most of the lifeguard stations, colorful replacements were erected. Admire the novel lifeguard stations between 10th and 16th Streets in South Beach.

South Beach - Droid

South Beach – Droid (Photo credit: ehpien)

south beach

south beach (Photo credit: eschipul)

2. Espanola Way is a quaint Spanish Meditteranean Village with plenty of great restaurants and bars. Walk in the footsteps of Desi Arnaz along Espanola Way between Washington Avenue and Drexel in South Beach to see Mediterranean Rivival Style architecture. Desi loved to party in this part of South Beach during the 1940s. He played his bongos and sang his Cubansongs along this charming street. This is where Desi Arnaz created the sultry rumba craze!

Desi Arnaz

Cover of Desi Arnaz

Barbara Capitman and her buddies at the Miami Design Preservaton League saved the structures on this alluring street. “The Historic Spanish Village” is modeled after the romantic Mediterranean villages found in France and Spain.

Today it consists of art galleries, restaurants, and quirky shops. See a flamengo dance performance or tour the art galleries and little boutique shops. Check out Havana 1957 for Cuban Cuisine; or the ”Tapas & Tintos” Tapas Bar while you are in the neighborhood. Look into their Flamengo Schedule to see a live performance. Get a refreshing Mojito at the Mojito Lounge. Tour the Clay Hotel on Española Way. Notorious mafia don Al Capone located his gambling ring at The Clay Hotel in the 1930′s. The Clay Hotel’s Old World ambiance is well-suited to the tropical magic of this part of South Beach that runs from Collins Avenue to Pennsylvania Avenue.

The hotel dominates the corner of quaint Española Way.  The Clay Hotel is nestled in the historic Art Deco District of Miami Beach characterized by the distinctive 1930′s architecture. Don Johnson, Sylvester Stallone and Elton John have all contributed to experienced the special atmosphere of The Clay Hotel. Movies and music videos have been shot at this hotel; including the pilot for Miami Vice and many episodes of the television show.

Spend the day at the beach or play tennis and racquetball at nearby Flamingo Park’s well maintained courts. Cool off in the olympic size swimming pool.

Top of the Cameo Theater

Over the past few years, the bars and restaurants in this area have increasingly become a gathering place for the large Italian community in Miami. There’s an excellent Italian Restaurant next to the Cameo Theater called Osteria del Teatro.

Try some of their authentic Italian Cuisine

 

Lincoln Road Places

Lincoln Road Places (Photo credit: AshtonColeman)

3. Lincoln Road Mall was designed by legendary architect, Morris Lapidus. Lincoln Road is a between Washington Avenue and Alton Road. Originally built in the 1920’s, it is brimming with shops, restaurants and galleries. Have some sweet treats at the Ice Box Cafe at 1657 Michigan Avenue.

Lincoln Road Mall in South Beach

Lincoln Road Mall in South Beach (Photo credit: Kwong Yee Cheng)

Lincoln Road

Lincoln Road (Photo credit: miamism)

The Art Deco district of South Beach in Miami,...

The Art Deco district of South Beach in Miami, Florida was developed during the 1930s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4. Tour the Deco District in South Beach with outstanding well- preserved buildings. The Miami Beach Architectural District (also known as Old Miami Beach Historic District or the Miami Art Deco District) is a U.S. historic district; designated on May 14, 1979.

The district is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Sixth Street to the south, Alton Road to the west, the Collins Canal and Dade Boulevard to the north. It contains 960 historic buildings.

Vintage T-Bird in front of the Avalon Hotel in South Beach

South Beach Map Above

The Ocean Drive area received Historic District designation thanks to the efforts of Barbara Baer Capitman and her fellow Art-Deco loving Miami Design Preservation League activists.

Berkeley Hotel on Collins in South Beach

You can buy some charming Vintage Posters in South Beach. The Art Deco era was ushered in with the Paris Exposition of 1925 ; the French name is “Les Arts Decoratifs. There are two distinctive design principles that characterize the geometric facade of these buildings: (1) the center element is the most dramatic; (2) the sides of the facade are symmetrical. The Miami Design Preservation League hosts an annual Art Deco Weekend in January. www.mdpl.org.

The Cardozo hotel is another SOuth Beach gem. It was named after the Supreme Court justice and it has been lovingly rehabbed by  Gloria and Emilio Estefan in an Asian Motif. Walk into the hotel to admire the vintage poster collection.

I also love the charming Beacon Hotel is where the movie “Scarface” was filmed with Al Pacino. After your Art Deco walking Tour, have a refreshing Miami Vice with a “Rum Floater” (presented in a test tube) at the Clevelander Hotel on Ocean Drive as you listen to live music. Everyone loves the Clevelander!

Have a Miami Vice at the Clevelander Hotel Outdoor Bar Area on Ocean Drive in South Beach

Hotels in South Beach Florida

Lobby at the Beacon Hotel in South Beach

Scar Face was filmed at the Beacon in South Beach

A Vintage Beacon Hotel Poster.

Marlin Hotel - Art Deco architecture on Collin...

Marlin Hotel – Art Deco architecture on Collins Ave. Miami Beach (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ocean Drive night South Beach Miami Florida

Ocean Drive night South Beach Miami Florida (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Miami Beach - South Beach: Wolfsonian-FIU

Miami Beach – South Beach: Wolfsonian-FIU (Photo credit: wallyg)

4. Visit the Wolfsonian Museum located at 1001 Washington Street. It  is a 1927 converted storage facility packed with Art-Deco artifacts. www.wolfsonian.org

Wolfsonian-FIU Entry to Galleries

Wolfsonian-FIU Entry to Galleries (Photo credit: steve goddard)

Wolfsonian-FIU Foyer

Wolfsonian-FIU Foyer (Photo credit: steve goddard)

Interior of Miami Holocaust Memorial - Miami B...

Interior of Miami Holocaust Memorial – Miami Beach, Florida, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

5. The Holocaust Memorial is the home of Kenneth Triester’s magnificent “Sculpture of Love and Anguish” at 1933 Meridean Avenue. Holocaust victims of concentration camps climb a out-stretched hand marked with an Auschwitz tattoo. Along the reflecting pond, learn about the story of the Holocaust

Facade of a parking garage spelling out the ce...

Facade of a parking garage spelling out the center’s name (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bayside Marketplace

Bayside Marketplace (Photo credit: miamism)

6. Go to Bayside Marketplace. It is a sprawling shopping and entertainment complex with some of the best Vino con Vista views in the city. Dine at Bubba Gump while you’re there.

View of Bayside Marketplace looking from north...

View of Bayside Marketplace looking from north to south (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Miami Downtown Freedom Tower

Miami Downtown Freedom Tower (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

7. Visit the Freedom Tower on Biscayne Boulevard was built in 1925 and modeled after the Giralda Tower in Seville, Spain.

The most dramatic building in downtown Miami is located at 600 Biscayne Boulevard. The brick and terra cotta, 17 story structure is 256 feet tall. On September 10, 1979, it entered the National Register of Historic Places.

Go to the galleries and streets of Wynwood for the monthly gallery walk. This is an industrial district that has been converted to an art mecca. There is a gathering of Food Trucks behind the outdoor museum called Wynwood Walls. Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/03/30/TRG91NK8GU.DTL#ixzz1t4V1x5oX

Freedom Tower in Miami Beach

Freedom Tower in Miami Beach

Gianni Versace mansion, South Beach, Miami, Fl...

Gianni Versace mansion, South Beach, Miami, Florida (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

8. The Villa by Barton G at 1114 Ocean Drive is the former Versace Mansion. The Versace Mansion, Casa  Casuarina was the residence of late Italian fashion designer Gianni Versace; founder of Gianni Versace S.p.A. In 1992, couturier Gianni Versace fell in love with Casa Casuarina. When he purchased the property, he went to battle with local preservationists after he announced his plans to tear down a neighboring  hotel so he could build a pool. Versace exquisitely restored, expanded, and embellished the original structure by adding the south wing and pool.

Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach Photo by Jim ...

Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach Photo by Jim Rees November 2004 Français : Hôtel File:Fontainebleau Miami Beach Resort.jpg Fontainebleau Hotel à Miami Beach en Floride, architecte Morris Lapidus Photo by Jim Rees November 2004 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ocean Drive in South beach is packed with outdoor restaurants and cafes. You can check out the food displays that line Ocean Drive.

Food Display at outdoor restaruant in South Beach

Food Display at outdoor restaruant in South Beach

Go to Joe’s Stone Crab at 11 Washington. It’s only open from October to May. Another must-do is News Cafe t 800 Ocean Drive. I like Escopazzo for Italian at 1311 Washington or the Forge for steak at 432 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Mango’s Tropical Cafe at 900 Ocean Drive is a Latin live-wire with plenty of music.

Mango in South Beach

Mango in South Beach

Mango in South Beach

Mango in South Beach

Stay and/or dine at the iconic Fontainebleau Miami Beach Hotel. It is one of my favorite Vino con Vista destinations in Miami Beach! The Fontainebleau is situated on the Atlantic oceanfront at Collins Avenue in the heart of Millionaire’s Row with 12 restaurants and bars; and a 40,000-square-foot spa. It is also the most historic and architecturally significant hotel on Miami Beach.  It was designed by Morris Lapidus and opened in 1954. On December 22, 2008, the Fontainebleau was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

I: Fontainebleau Hotel:

Celebrities like Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis broke the integration barrier in Miami Beach at this hotel. Jerry Lewis waged his war against Muscular Dystrophy at this hotel with his Labor Day Marathon fund-raising events.
The hotel was also the setting for Jerry Lewis‘s 1960 comedy film, The Bellboy. Here’s a picture of Jerry Lewis on the diving board at the Fontainbleau pool.
Cover of "The Bellboy"Cover of The Bellboy

The hotel and pool were featured in the following films: Scarface, Go for It , Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach and The Bodyguard (1992) with Whitney Houston.

Cover of "The Bodyguard (Special Edition)...Cover of The Bodyguard (Special Edition)
Cover of "Police Academy 5 - Assignment M...Cover via Amazon

I also love the Betsy Ross Hotel at 1440 Ocean Drive in South Beach. It originally opened in 1942 when America was at war and many local hotels became barracks for soldiers who trained on the beaches before being deployed. The hotel under went a total restoration in 2009 and was renamed The Betsy-South Beach. It has the perfect location with a birds-eye view of Lummas Park in the heart of the Art Deco District. It’s across from the beach and it is a member of the “Small Luxury Hotels of the World.” The hotel has Miami’s only fully outdoor Roof Deck Wellness garden that offers spa treatments. Make reservations @ www.thebetsyhotel.com

Lobby of the Betsy Ross Hotel in South Beach

Lobby of the Betsy Ross Hotel in South Beach

Betsy Ross Hotel in South Beach

Betsy Ross Hotel in South Beach

Pool at the Betsy Ross

Pool at the Betsy Ross

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Casa Casuarina: The Mansion where Gianni Versace Lived and Died in South Beach Florida

Villa Versace

Image via WikipediaIron Gate at the entrance of the Versace Mansion

Red Versace dress of Cindy Crawford

Red Versace dress of Cindy Crawford (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Versace Mansion, Casa  Casuarina was the residence of late Italian fashion designer Gianni Versace; founder of Gianni Versace S.p.A. Gianni Versace. This Italian fashion designer  designed costumes for the theatre and films. He was a friend of many celebrities including: Madonna, Elton John, Cher and Sting.

Versace

Versace (Photo credit: vpickering)

In 1992, couturier Gianni Versace fell in love with Casa Casuarina;  now known as “The Villa By Barton G.”

When he purchased the property, he went to battle with local preservationists after he announced his plans to tear down a neighboring  hotel so he could build a pool. Versace exquisitely restored, expanded, and embellished the original structure by adding the south wing and pool.

For a fabulous Vino con Vista, stretch out on a lounge chair at  “The Thousand Mosaic Pool and Mosaic Garden” area.

The 19,000 square foot Casa Casuarina is now the home of an elegant boutique hotel. The Gianni Versace logo embellishes the ironwork fence and planters. In 1993, Versace was inspired to design a collection devoted to Miami Beach.

Every day, Gianni would stroll over to the News Cafe on Ocean Drive to have coffee and read the Italian-language newspapers and  international periodicals. That was the last place he was seen on the day he was murdered. Versace was murdered on the front steps of his home by Andrew Cunanan on July 15, 1997.

The News Store in South Beach

Detail from Gianni Versace's Mansion, Miami Be...

Image via Wikipedia

Versace logo

.

The Versace Mansion in South Beach Arched entrance of the Versace Mansion

This incredible Mediterranean Rivival stucture is located at Ocean Drive and 11th Street.

The notable  eclectic architecture includes the dome of the private observatory, arched windows and metal ironwork.

It was originally built in 1930 as a getaway for a wealthy oil executive by architect, philanthropist, author and political reformer Alden Freeman. This Mediterranean Revival house was “constructed partially of coral and featured exposed timbers.” The three-story palace was modeled after the  Governor’s House in Santo Domingo; as “an homage to the oldest existing house in the western hemisphere, the “Alcazar de Colon” in Santo Domingo.”

Versace Mansion in South BeachBeautiful Urn in the Courtyard

Upper Level of the Versace Mansion

In 1937, after Freeman’s death, Casa Casuarina was bought by Jacques Amsterdam, who renamed it “The Amsterdam Palace.” He operated the structure as an apartment building and most of the residents were artists.

Fresco in the courtyard

Dome of the Versace Mansion

Versace Mansion Fountain in the Courtyard of the Versace Mansion

Intricate Flooring in the Versace Courtyard

Europe Statue in the Courtyard Africa Statue

Asia Statue

America Statue

I love the statues in the courtyard that represent the continents. Each sculpture has the names of famous people from each region engraved on the face of the statue.

Gianni Versace

Gianni Versace (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a video of the Versace Spring 2012 Collection: http://www.versace.com/en/women-fashion-and-accessories/ss-2012/fashion-show-video

Today, the former home of Gianni Versace on South Beach, is a swanky hotel and restaurant called The Villa By Barton G. Barton G. Weiss is a famous restaurateur who took over the mansion in December 2009.

Menu at the Villa

This elegant boutique luxury hotel also has a restaurant and space for events. There are 10 unique luxury suites that range from 500 to 3,500 square feet at this incredible oasis in the heart of South Beach. You can relax on the Rooftop Lounge, get a poolside spa treatments or request your own personal British-trained butler.

Check it out here: http://www.lhw.com/Hotel/The-Villa-By-Barton-G-Miami-FL

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Bronze Statue in Foyer

This property is a member of “The Leading Small Hotels of the World”

The Villa by Barton G. is located @ 1116 Ocean Drive Miami Beach, Florida (800) 258-7503

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South Beach Wine and Food Festival 2015: Events are Selling Out Fast!

Culinary Students from FIU’s Chaplin mSchool of Hospitality and Tourism ManagementSumptuous Cuisine at Best of the Best SOBE 2012Celebrity Chefs at SOBE 2012

English: Food Network star Guy Fieri introduce...

English: Food Network star Guy Fieri introduces the teams for the Iron Chef BBQ Competition at the Tiki Bar. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Calling all foodies and wine enthusiasts. It’s time to uncork and decant your favorite wine and hide your scale so you can indulge in four days of sumptuous cuisine at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival 2015!

Here’s a link to all of the events: http://www.sobefest.com/events.php?cat_id=All

Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE is pleased to announce its upcoming program of events.

WHEN:  The 14th annual Festival, taking place February 19-22, 2015, consists of more than 75 events during the four-day, star-studded gourmet gathering, featuring new parties and talent alongside a noticeable refresh of the Festival’s most signature tastings.  As it has since its inception, the Festival benefits the Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management’s Wine Spectator Restaurant Management Laboratory and Southern Wine & Spirits Beverage Management Center at Florida International University.

“This is surely a year that our loyal fans will do a double-take at the program and new attendees will find plenty of events to choose from,” predicts Festival Founder & Director Lee Brian Schrager, who also serves as Vice President of Corporate Communications & National Events at Southern Wine & Spirits of America, Inc.  “We have made significant changes to upgrade the experience at our signature Whole Foods Market Grand Tasting Village and are taking our beloved event, The Q, to the next level by partnering with Meatopia.”

The Festival kicks off on Thursday, February 19 with Ronzoni Pasta’s 100th Anniversary Seaside Spaghetti Soirée sponsored by MIAMI magazine hosted by Debi Mazar & Gabriele Corcos, a celebration of pasta and all forms of Italian-American cuisine under the Festival’s signature white tents in the sand behind South Beach’s iconic Delano.  These same sparkling white sands will be the foundation for the brand new version of the Festival’s treasured celebration of all things grilled, braised and barbecued as Meatopia: The Q Revolution presented by Creekstone Farms hosted by Guy Fieri curated by Josh Ozersky on Saturday, February 21.

The Festival is taking significant strides in 2015 to upgrade its landmark Whole Foods Market Grand Tasting Village featuring MasterCard Grand Tasting Tents & KitchenAid® Culinary Demonstrations.  While enjoying samplings from a seemingly endless variety of restaurants and wine and spirits brands from the Southern Wine & Spirits of Florida portfolio, attendees will notice key advancements to the beachside venue which spans from 10th Street to 13th Street off Ocean Drive.  Changes include more seating and shaded areas, live music and DJs, select ‘park and ride’ offerings (at no additional cost), and the introduction of chef Culinary Captains who will represent cohorts of chefs from various neighborhoods throughout South Florida.

New events taking place throughout the 2015 Festival include:

  • Poolside Paella Party hosted by José Andrés
  • Tacos After Dark hosted by Aarón Sánchez
  • Empanada & Wine Happy Hour
  • A rooftop ice cream and chocolate party with Candace Nelson of the Beverly Hills based Sprinkles Cupcakes, who is known for catching the taste buds of celebrities like Oprah Winfrey
  • Tribute to the resurgence of tiki culture mixology during a late-night, poolside bartender competition hosted by Emeril Lagasse
  • A late-night spiced up soirée centered around Caribbean-jerk hosted by cookbook author, chef and restaurateur Bobby Flay
  • Dessert done South Beach-style by modern day Willy Wonka and Cronut™ inventor Dominique Ansel
  • Plus an unprecedented series of intimate and unique dinner experiences featuring world-renowned culinary talent!

Fan favorite events such as the Amstel Light Burger Bash presented by Schweid & Sons hosted by Rachael Ray, Fontainebleau Miami Beach presents Wine Spectator’s Best of the Best sponsored by Bank of America & Merrill Lynch, Fun and Fit as a Family featuring Goya Kidz Kitchen, YogArt presents Buddhas and Bellinis, Bank of America Lifestyle Seminars, Wine Spectator Wine Seminars, Goya Foods’ Swine & Wine hosted by Marc Forgione, and more will return, sure to satiate every type of budget and palate.

Loews Miami Beach, the Festival’s host hotel, will again host the annual Tribute Dinner sponsored by Bank of America; part of The New York Times Dinner Series. The 2015 Festival will honor Chef Juan Mari Arzak, the acclaimed pioneer of Basque cuisine, and Ted Baseler, president and CEO of Ste. Michelle Wine Estates.

Stay up-to-date with the excitement by following the Festival at www.Facebook.com/SOBEWFF or follow Founder and Director Lee Brian Schrager at www.twitter.com/Lee_Schrager.

About the Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE

All proceeds from the Festival benefit the students of the Florida International University Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management who also assist Festival organizers with sponsorship fulfillment, restaurant and exhibitor recruitment, logistics, and inventory as well as working alongside some of the world’s greatest celebrity chefs and winemakers.  To date, the Festival has raised more than $20 million for the School.  In October 2013, BizBash named the Festival the #1 Food & Restaurant Industry event in the United States.

The Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE is produced by Florida International University and Southern Wine & Spirits of Florida with the support of the Miami Beach Visitors & Convention Authority and the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information about the Festival, visit www.sobefest.com or call 877-762-3933. For more information about Florida International University visit www.fiu.edu, for the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management visit www.hospitality.fiu.edu and for more information about Southern Wine & Spirits visit www.southernwine.com.

 

Here’s a list of the hotels:

 

Albion Hotel

1650 James Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Deluxe Petite Room $239.00
Deluxe King $287.00
Deluxe Queen/Queen $299.00

Dream Hotel

1111 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Deluxe Rooms $249.00 – $339.00

Catalina

1732 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Living Large Room $295.00

Delano

1685 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Deluxe $529.00
Alcove $649.00
Ocean Front KG $709

Fontainebleau

4441 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL 33140

Oceanview $499.00
Deluxe Balcony $529.00
Sorrento One Bedroom Suite $899.00

Gale Hotel

1690 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL 33140

Signature Rooms $329.00
Kaskades Suites $525.00  Double/Double $365.00

James Hotel

1545 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL 33139

Run of House $439.00
Deluxe Double $599.00
2 Bedroom Apartment $859.00

Kimpton Surfcomber

1717 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Run of House $389.00

Loews Miami Beach Hotel

1601 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Run of House $479.00
Luxury $499.00

The National Hotel

1677 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Art Deco Room $379.00
Ocean View Room $429.00
Pool Side King of Queen $579.00

The Ritz-Carlton South Beach

One Lincoln Road
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Interior Room Views $559.00
Partial Ocean View Rooms $669.00
Lanai Pool View Rooms with Balcony $669.00

Thompson Hotel

4041 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Deluxe $359.00

Riviera South Beach

2000 Liberty Avenue
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Balcony Room $325.00

Shore Club

1901 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Run of House King $349.00
Double Double $399.00

W South Beach

2201 Collins Ave
Miami Beach FL, 33139

Wonderful King $589.00
Oasis Suite $809.00

Reservations: In order to receive these special festival rates please contact Carol Press at 786.206.2717 (Please do not call hotels directly).

Guidelines: All rooms and rates available on a first come, first serve basis. Rates do not include taxes, gratuity, parking, porterage, or incidentals. 3-night minimum on some reservations. Rates based on single or double occupancy. A valid credit card number and expiration date must be provided for every booking.

 

TICKETS: www.sobefest.com

Raise Your Glass to the Philanthropic Celebrity Chefs and Sponsors at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival for generating over $17 million for FIU’s Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism management. The Food Network, Southern Wine & Spirtis of Florida and FOOD & WINE Magazine presented a series of culinary events led by world-renown chefs and world-class spirits and wine companies at the annual Foodie Event of the Year.

Florida International University - School of H...

Florida International University – School of Hospitality & Tourism Management Center in Tianjin, China (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Celebrity Chefs at SOBE 2012

Wine and Swine Event at SOBE 2012

Hundreds of food and wine festivals are held in the U.S. each year. Some  are decades-old events and others are new kids on the block.

A typical food and wine festival  feature tastings, pairings, demonstrations and “dine-arounds” held at local restaurants. Some even have cookbook signings by celebrity chefs.

These events are generally about philanthrophy. In South Beach, sponsors collaborated with Celebrity Chefs, culinary students and over 11,000 team members raise money for culinary students. The South Beach Food and Wine Festival 2013 was one of the best food and wine festivals in the country!

Celebrity Chefs at SOBE 2012

The 14th edition of the annual fund-raiser for Florida International University‘s Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management worked to generate over $17 milllion since the inception of the Festival eleven years ago. Nearly 1000 students volunteered thousands of hours preparing for this incredible 4-day wine, spirits and culinary extravaganza. The students are preparing to walk in the footsteps of the Celebrity Chefs to become future leaders in these exciting industries.

Emeril Lagasse at SOBE 2012

There were dozens of exciting events including: late-night parties, special dinners, signature food and wine tastings and culinary demonstrations led by Rock Star celebrity chefs. For the full list of events visit www.sobefest.com so you can save the date for next year’s extravaganza!

Bobby Deen at SOBE 2012

Nadia G at SOBE 2012

Rachel Ray at SOBE 2012

 

Wine Auction at Best of the Best Sobe 2012

Best of the Best at the Fontainebleau Miami 2012

 

SOBE Bites 2012

Tasty bites at SOBE 2012

I was sipping plenty of wine from around the world and tasting the unbridled flavors of signature bites from famous restaurants around the country.

Sumptuous Cuisine at Best of the Best SOBE 2012

Grand Tasting Village Entrance at SOBE 2012

Over $17 million has been generated in the past to fund state-of-the-art facilities including: the Southern Wine and Spirits Beverage Management Center, the Hilton Training Kitchen, a teaching restaurant, dining room and wine cellar and the Angostura Culinary Lecture/Demonstration Classroom. For more information on this extraordinary program visit  www.hospitality.fiu.edu

Follow my blog to learn about Wine and Food Festivals that are held all over the country.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Gina and Pat Neely at SOBE 2012

SOBE 2012

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Buon Natale and Christmas: The Feast Day of the Immaculate Conception in Rome

Colonna dell'Immacolata
Image by asw909 via Flickr

December 8th is the Feast Day of the Immaculate Conception. In Rome, there is an annual papal procession near the Spanish Steps. The Pope pays hommage to the Virgin Mary with a procession led by the Order of the Knights of Malta to Piazza Mignanelli at the Colonna dell’Immacolata in the southeastern section of the square. The 40 foot ancient column was found in 1777 under a monestery and was erected in this location in 1856 and a statue of Mary was placed at the summit of the column.

Marian Column in front of Santa Maria Maggiori in Rome

Listen to Luciano Pavarotti singing  “Ave Maria” by Schubert  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPvAQxZsgpQ.

At the annual ceremony, the reigning Pope honors Mary at this location. Listen to what Pope Benedict XVI said: http://bit.ly/fdDphS.  After the prayers, the choir sings and one lucky Roman fireman gets to place a wreath of  flowers at the top of the column on the Statue of Mary usually on her extended arm. This is a great opportunity to see the Pope in Rome.  The Holy Father blesses a basket of roses that are placed at the base of the column. The Mayor of Romeand other civic department heads follow suit.

The Immaculate Conception

Image via Wikipedia

There is an evening concert at the Basilica of Santa Maria in Ara Coeli on Capitoline Hill. December 8th is a Holy Day of Obligation and a national holiday in Italy. There are celebrations throughout Italy and churches hold special masses to honor Mary. Look for bagpipes throughout Italy today as the Zampognari play “Quando Nascette Ninno” (When the Child was Born).

Visit the renovated frescoes at the “Immaculate Conception Room” at the Vatican Museums painted by Francesco Podesti. The frescoes are an artistic representation of the Virgin Mary’s Immaculate Conception declared by Pope Pius IX.

Buon Natale from www.vino-con-vista.com
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Buon Natale and Christmas: Krampus and Other Holiday Events in Trentino-Alto Adige

Larix decidua forest, Dolomites, San Genesio A...
Image via Wikipedia

This mountainous region of northeastern Italy is characterized by the unparalleled beauty of majestic mountains and lovely scenic lakes. It is divided by the Adige River.  Trentino is Italian-speaking and Alto-Adige, the German-speaking area is known as the South Tyrol. Alto-Adige was part of Austria until after World War I. Cortina is home to many fashion juggernauts including Bulgari, Gucci, Benneton and Geox. Trentino is the home of Cavit’s wine empire.

English: Maria Himmelfahrt, Bolzano. Deutsch: ...

English: Maria Himmelfahrt, Bolzano. Deutsch: Dom Maria Himmelfahrt, Bozen. Italiano: Duomo di Bolzano. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the 1960’s Provincial Road #14 was transformed into the Winestrasse (Wine Trail).  The South Tyrol Wine Road in Alto Adige runs along the right bank of the Adige River between Salorno and Bolzano. It is one of the most scenic roads in Italy. Pristine vineyards carpet lush Alpine valleys. Stop at the wineries for a “Vino con Vista.” This region produces grappa.

Bressanone

Bressanone (Photo credit: davideoneclick)

In 2009, UNESCO added the snow-clad Dolomites on the east side of the Province to Italy’s World Heritage List. This area has frequent landslides, floods and avalanches and UNESCO hoped to secure more rigourous defense and preservation of this area. The Dolomites are Italy’s most distinctive mountains and were formed 200 million years ago from the Primeval ocean. Their majestic mineralized coral forms magical spires, pinnacles and rock walls. The mountains include 18 majestic peaks with interesting rock formations that are perfect for skiing. The “Cinque Torri” rock formations include five towers that soar to heights of 7,762 feet.

 

Comprensorios del Tirol del Sur (Italia).

Comprensorios del Tirol del Sur (Italia). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Holiday Events  with Germanic traditions and Italian flavors 

During the Christmas period the towns of Bolzano, Merano, Bressanone, Vipiteno, and Brunjco offer Holiday markets. The Christmas tree (Christbaum) and the Nativity scenes are common themes in this region. There are ancient nativity rituals in Bressanone and the Gries Abbey during Advent.

In Passo dell Stelvio, the first Saturday in December celebrates “Festa dei Klosen” dedicated to Santa Claus. Locals dressed in costumes wander the streets until the Church bells ring and everyone unites in prayer

In the historic center of Arco attend “Festa d’Immacolota” on December 7th for fireworks from the castle and a Christmas market with local delicacies like apple brule, cheeses and honey until December 23rd in the historic center of town.

In Bolzano attend “Christkindlmarkt” in Piazza Walter until December 23 with delicious Germanic sweets like “zelten,” a sweet from Bolzano, based on dried figs, almonds, and candied fruit. Local tradition  provides crowns made of fir branches interwoven with ribbons and four candles. In Bolzano, they light one candle each Sunday for the four weeks of Advent.

Vintage Christmas Krampus Postcard with St. Ni...

Vintage Christmas Krampus Postcard with St. Nicholas in window (Photo credit: riptheskull)

On December 5th Bolzano celebrates the arrival of Saint Nikolaus, protector of children. During this traditional celebration, Nikolaus  is accompanied by angels and he is bearing gifts for good children. The festivities juxtapose this symbol of Good  flanked by Evil, personified by “Krampus.”  Krampus is a two-horned furry demon.  In Brunico, 150 of these “Krampus” demons parade, armed with chains and whips.

In Bressanone visit the “Il Presepe” exhibit at the Episcopal Palace until January 6th and the “Weihnachtsmarkt” Alpine Christmas Market until January 8th at the Piazza Duomo. Vin brule is distributed after the concerts and mass at the cathedral.

The 18th Annual Merano Christmas Market where most of the historic center is transformed into an outdoor market until January 7th.

Tastes of Valsugana in Levico in Parco della Terme until January 6th with Hapsburg-style horse drawn carriage rides.

In Trento attend the Christmas Market until December 23 in Piazza Fiera

In Cavalese attend the “Trial of the Witches” the first week of January.

In Cortina d’Ampezzo on Christmas Eve there is a torchlight parade of skiiers. There will also be a “EuroChocolate Ski” Event in this upscale Dolomite ski resort between December 16th and 19th.

Order a book and Buon Natale basket for your favorite Italophiles at www.vino-con-vista.info. To learn more about Italy read www.vino-con-vista Travel Guides.

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